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A job or a praktikum...What should I look for?

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Hi all! I would like to ask you something about German job market, compare it with the Italian one and talk about the relative education systems.

 

First of all my situation...I'm 25 and I recently graduated in Industrial Engineering (Mid-2013, Master's Degree) at the Rome University with maximum grades and respecting the timing(only 4 months late). I did erasmus too and I speak fluent Italian, English and Spanish. Currently I'm studying German, I'm A2-B1. (I attended an intensive language course in Munich for 1 month).

 

Although here in Italy economic crisis is very strong I have actually not so many problems in finding a work here :blink: but wages are low and I'm really tired of seeing corruption and collusion everywhere. I'm strongly attracted by the idea of moving in Germany and Munich is my first choice.

 

I'm currently doing a "Stage" in Italy (something similar to a Praktikum/Internship) aimed at the employment in a big car company...but the department where I'm working in doesn't fit my interests, it's unorganized as well as unprofessional(something really unbelievable). In December I started to apply to German companies placed in the nearby of Munich. I read a lot of guides about how my "Bewerbungsunterlagen" should be, I wrote all in German(of course my German friends helped me), I put a good professional photo on it, Deckblatt, good motivation letter, certificates etc.. etc..

 

Since then, all companies I've applied for discarded me. They didn't even called me for a job interview. I applied for both open positions and praktikum.(Many different personalized applications that cost me many sleeping hours).

 

Only now I'm realizing how much German and Italian education systems are different.

My big problem is that in Italy university students are not supposed to do "praktikum" or any practical experience during their studies, they just have to study an incredible amount of theory and different subjects. Therefore it's normal to attend a "stage" after your studies in order to learn how to work and then get employed. In other words companies are supposed to teach the graduates how to work because out of the university they are still not ready. Germany it's another world, German students get the degree one year before then the Italian ones

(23 vs. 24 years) and they are almost ready to work because they are obliged to collect several praktikum during their studies!

 

So...In Germany internships seem reserved only to students and direct entry positions require work experience in the specific field...What could I do?

Maybe improving my German is a solution?

 

If you are/have been in a similar situation tell me something! :)

Any help is appreciated! I really would like to know if there are in Munich English speaking companies that hires graduates with no specific work experience...

 

Thanks in advance!

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Why should a German company hire somebody who doesn't speak German with an education nobody is familiar with? There are enough German engineers.

What about studying in Germany for some years (and learn the language) or do a PhD?

You are still very young. However, you should finish your studies before you are 30.

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Maybe you work in Italy for some time at low wages. This should be equivalent to praktikum - you yourself have mentioned it. I mean then you would have had some experience too and maybe you have a better chance. Meanwhile you continue learning your German with an aim of C1. All this should help you.

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Hi,

I am a german. I registered to answer your question.

Yes, you need at least one internship.

But after the internship you might get a job at the same company.

 

No, you do not need to speak perfect german.

Some companies have english as their corporate language.

 

No, there are not enough german engineers! But Munich might be hard.

Try also other cities.

For companies:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/VDMA

http://www.vdma.org/en/mitglieder

http://www.vdma.org/en/fachverbaende

Baden Württemberg is strong in engineering.

 

Germany companies try had to get foreign engineers to work in germany.

Watch this video:

 

 

Maybe also go to your local Arbeitsagentur.

 

Good luck!

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PS: if they require student status for tax purposes, enroll at FernUniversität Hagen.

Costs you 60€ (?) per semester, if you do not chose any courses.

(It is a state-owned distance study university with a good reputation.)

Depending on the state you could also enroll at a local university.

Baden Würrtemberg has dropped fees as far as i know --> costs now: 100€ per semester(?)

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So much willingness to help, and so much misinformation.

 

 

Yes, you need at least one internship. But after the internship you might get a job at the same company.

 

Agreed, an internship can be a good way to get your foot in the door. However, most companies in OP's field won't consider him for an internship since he's already got his degree, i.e. he's not a student any longer.

 

 

No, you do not need to speak perfect german. Some companies have english as their corporate language.

 

Also agreed, you don't need perfect German. However, you do need at least B2, preferably C1 in most (engineering) companies to be able to communicate with your colleagues and with clients.

 

 

No, there are not enough german engineers! But Munich might be hard.

 

Actually, there are enough German engineers just out of engineering school, trying to find a job. What there is a real lack of is engineers with 5-10 years of experience.

 

 

Germany companies try had to get foreign engineers to work in germany. Watch this video: http://www.youtube.c...h?v=M5GUQ8fO8sc

 

This paints a very unrealistic picture, especially given OP's circumstances. The Spanish engineer portrayed in the clip already spoke German when he arrived, and took 3 hours of German classes after work every day *after* arriving.

 

For a more realistic view on Germany's efforts to attract foreign Fachkräfte, you might want to read this thread: Make it in Germany: The Bundesregierung's Propoganda Portal

 

RR1988, I do wish you all the best. Please don't think I'm trying to discourage you from exploring every avenue. However, IMO I would be doing you a disservice by glossing over the problems in your plan, or sugarcoating the difficulties.

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(Disclaimer: I'm Italian and came to Germany 2 years ago with C1-2 German)

 

It would be best for you to gain a couple of years (3-5) of practical experience in Italy and eventually learn German on the side. I know it may be painful to keep on working in badly organized italian companies for a low salary, but if you come here as a newly minted graduate you may face an extremely strong competition from the local graduates which already know the language perfectly and do not require further "integration". If you come here as a professional, you may find a fairly flourishing market.

 

Potential exceptions: "hidden champions" in small towns, it may be difficult for them to attract german graduates which rightfully prefer to live in bigger cities, and you may have a chance if you start as an "International Trainee".

 

In any case, your attractivness for german employers lies in your lower salary requirements (for junior positions).

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They don't offer attractive salaries either, but maybe some of the specialist temporary work agencies are worth talking to (in person).

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Actually, there are enough German engineers just out of engineering school, trying to find a job. What there is a real lack of is engineers with 5-10 years of experience.

 

...and with the salary expectations of someone just out of engineering school...

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