Daylight saving time - Germany

89 posts in this topic

6 hours ago, LeonG said:

 

Iceland is permanently on DST since the late 60's. It is however a country with very little daylight in winter so you'll be going to work in the dark and going home in the dark anyway.


Fair enough.  I did learn that DST year round wouldn’t please me from that experience.  And now that I’ve been in Germany in the winter, I guess I’m used to darkness in winter now.  

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It's probably an individual reaction. Winter darkness got worse for me with every year of the ten years I spent in Germany. But I have a cousin who's half-Norwegian: she's lived in Anchorage, Alaska for over fifty years, and she loves it. It's got to be in her genes!

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54 minutes ago, katheliz said:

It's probably an individual reaction. Winnter darkness got worse for me with every year of the ten years I spent in Germany. But I have a cousin who's half-Norwegian: she's lived in Anchorage, Alaska for over fifty years, and she loves it. It's got to be in her genes!

 

That's probably true. I read about some research where they said that winter darkness depression is much less common among people whose ancestors came from northern areas.

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I come from a rather greyer country than Germany, so I enjoy the brighter skies here, when we get them.  The darker winter months have never bothered me, until this year, and I believe it's because I'm working from home. I'm much more aware of when the sun comes up and when it goes down.  In the past, I was out and about all day, driving from company to company and home in the evenings, when it was already dark.  This past year, I've noticed how short the day actually is in winter and I found that was dragging me down.  I sometimes felt that the day was just getting started, when suddenly, it was getting dark again and it was nearly time to go to bed again.  So happy the clocks have changed and the evenings are getting longer, it's making a difference to me already.

 

I'm not a big vitamin taker, I prefer to eat lots of vegetables and some fruit and various other foods, but I started taking vitamin D this year to get me through this winter, something I have never done before.  I wonder if that's the same for other people?

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When I came back to the US, I slept with the light on for years. Just an ordinary light bulb, not one of the fancy ones. I don't know whether it really helped, but I believed it did.

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5 hours ago, katheliz said:

It's probably an individual reaction. Winter darkness got worse for me with every year of the ten years I spent in Germany. But I have a cousin who's half-Norwegian: she's lived in Anchorage, Alaska for over fifty years, and she loves it. It's got to be in her genes!

Perhaps she likes putting candles on at 3 pm :).

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1 hour ago, BethAnnBitt said:

1996 was a one a one off year, but DST was permanently scrapped in 2012.  My kids there love not changing their clocks.  I would too.  There’s no DST in Arizona or Hawaii either.  
https://www.timeanddate.com/news/time/armenia-ends-dst.html

 

Yeah, I knew that they quit changing the clocks in Armenia.  It's probably not a bad idea. 

 

I remember in 1996 asking at my school when the clocks were going to change and they said they weren't.  I never found out why.  I didn't have access to much local news at that time.

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6 hours ago, LeonG said:

 

That's probably true. I read about some research where they said that winter darkness depression is much less common among people whose ancestors came from northern areas.

 

That makes sense.  Maybe my dad's Laplander and Norwegian genes protect me from the SAD?  I also come from a cloudy northern place where nearly everyone feels a little brought down by glum days and darkness, which never bothered me.  I love the darkness of winter, can't explain why but it makes me feel more alive.  I rather wither away in the sun or during hot weather.

 

2 hours ago, Tap said:

I wonder if that's the same for other people?

 

I also eat a lot of fruits and veggies and started taking Vitamin D for the first time this winter, not because winter makes me feel bad but because I read it gives you more energy and that most people are deficient in it.  The time of year I started taking it was just a coincidence.  I'll keep taking it all year long, especially because as a conscious sun-avoider I do not get enough direct sunlight to produce it on my own.

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