Cooking with Philadelphia cream cheese

107 posts in this topic

I also use the Leibniz Vollkorn-Kekse for a cheesecake crust. Graham crackers are actually just whole wheat cookies with cinnamon so the Leibniz come pretty close.

2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Metall said:

Try a no bake version! :)

 

My german considers that the epitome of American short-cutting. ;)

 

When it's this hot though, I prefer to forego the cheesecake and go straight to the fruit topping with whip cream  (American style, with vanilla and sugar), so it's hardly a sacrifice not to cook this weekend.  

2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 28.8.2016, 13:53:51, Porky Pine said:

 

 

 

I came across an interesting site, and although it doesn't address our own special problem with German Philadelphia cream cheese, you might find some very useful tips. In the meantime, I'll keep on looking through my recipes for you.
http://www.thekitchn.com/how-to-make-perfect-cheesecake-recipe-cooking-lessons-from-the-kitchen-110760

 

What a coincidence! I just used this recipe about a month ago and it came out great, using the usual doppelrahm stuff. I've already recommended it for lots of people. The steps are very easy to understand and it helps with all of those problems like cracks and water leakage.I'm actually not having a cheesecake problem, but a cream cheese (no bake) bon-bon problem. It turns into soup and won't thicken. I'm going to try Marscapone and then if that doesn't work, then I'll try this idea from Returning

 

On 28.8.2016, 14:01:46, Returning said:

To make the cream cheese here thicker, I haven't tried this, but it should work.  Layer cheesecloth over a bowl or pan, and put the cream cheese on the cheesecloth.  Secure the cheesecloth with a rubber band or something, and layer cling wrap on the top of the cream cheese.  Add a little bit of weight on top of the cream cheese, not enough to force the cream cheese itself through the cloth, but enough to let the extra liquid drain out overnight.  Or, wrap the cream cheese in something with a tighter weave than cheesecloth, and manually press out the extra liquid.

 

I brought a kitchenaid over from the States and I'm dying to get my recipes to work over here. Thanks for all the tips guys:)

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This topic is 13 years old but I might have the answer to your cream cheese woes! I took suffered from the overly creamy and liquid Philadelphia doppelrahmstufe (or whatever). I'm not a big cheesecake baker but I mainly only like cream cheese frosting when I frost something. Nothing I tried here was living up to the good stuff. Until... my husband annoying bought me one I never tried when he couldn't find Philadelphia.

 

You can find it at your local Lidl from the brand Milbona. It's Bio Frischkäse Pur. After pouring the water off the consistency was much more like the baking Philadelphia that comes in the silver foil brick (if my memory serves correctly). It's sort of dry and breaks apart. But unlike other Frischkäse I've tried it actually beats into a smooth texture. Other ones always were lumpy.

I've now made mini cheesecake cupcakes with them which were great aside from. me overcooking them. I also just whipped up a batch of cream cheese/whipped cream frosting and it's better than any other I've made since moving here.

I hope this helps someone else out there. Please comment if you bake an actual cheesecake (not käsekuchen!) with it.

4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A similar discussion is going on Twitter right now, and amazingly since 2006 nobody's mentioned the word Frischkäsezubereitung.  That's what the Philadelphia brand sells here in Germany, but you have to look at the ingredients list itself to see it.  I'm convinced that's the issue and not the Doppelrahmstufe. In fact, the Philadelphia brick in the US has 35 grams of fat per 100g, while German Frischkäse tops out at 27g fat in the brands I looked at in this spreadsheet  - and the Philadelphia Frischkäsezubereitung only has 21g. 

 

Thanks to @ellbie for confirming that draining water from Frischkäse and maybe even Frischkäsezubereitung worked well for cream cheese frosting, too.  That Milbona brand has the highest fat content I've seen in Germany... 28.7g!

https://www.cynthiabarcomi.com/buecher might be useful too. The American mentioned above who has a whole book dedicated to baking cheesecakes in Germany.

 

And there's a whole thread about baking cheesecakes in Germany with notable successes: https://www.toytowngermany.com/forum/topic/18089-baked-cheesecakes/?page=3#comment-1547868 

 

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mascarpone has about 40gr of fat, you can use if from a more decadent Cheesecake. It lacks on acidity in comparison to Cream Cheese but it's creamier.

You can also mix Mascarpone with a 25-27gr Cream cheese and achieve a similar fat content with the american cream cheese.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now