Public vs. private health insurance

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My salary is way above the limit for GKV .

But my past employer used to pay the contribution to TK .

Today I received also a letter from TK, where they are saying that they were informed by my employer that I will pay myself the contribution .

My question is if there is any difference from me paying the contribution to TK monthly and by the contribution being paid by my employer ? 

I would prefer that my employer would do this of course .

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why don't you talk to your employer and ask them to keep paying it?  Did they ever discuss this with you?  

 

if your employer agrees to pay it, they can just inform TK and that will be that.  TK doesn't care how they get the money, so long as they get it.  There should be no difference whatsoever provided it gets paid.

 

eta:  if you have to pay it yourself, see here:  https://www.tk.de/techniker/service/leistungen-und-mitgliedschaft/beitraege/beitrag-selbst-zahlen-2000742  And if you need to call them they usually have english speakers available to help if needed.  

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just to be clear, you're only being asked to pay YOUR PART of the contribution, right?

 

if your employer told tk you'd be paying all of it, something is wrong.

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1 hour ago, bbogdanmircea said:

My salary is way above the limit for GKV .

But my past employer used to pay the contribution to TK .

Today I received also a letter from TK, where they are saying that they were informed by my employer that I will pay myself the contribution .

My question is if there is any difference from me paying the contribution to TK monthly and by the contribution being paid by my employer ? 

I would prefer that my employer would do this of course .

there is no difference in the monthly costs, regardless of who pays.

 

Cheerio

 

I am a professional independent insurance broker, financial adviser, and authorised advertiser. Contact me.
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From my calculations yes, the employer added to my netto the part that the company should pay so everything should be ok if I make a SEPA Mandat for TK and they take the contribution from my account .

I asked just to make sure which is the best way regarding further tax declaration or other stuff ...

At least now I know what the total amount for the medical insurance is, to be honest it's quite a lot and I am starting to think that it may be a better idea to lower it, but this can be done just by a private insurance right ?

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I've talked to an insurance broker who very much suggests switching to a private health insurance. If I understood correctly, it won't be cheaper - I pay 425 € per month for the public insurance that covers also my wife. The private insurance would cost 300 € / month, but given that we would then need to pay for my wife's insurance as well, it would end up costing closer to 500 € / month. If we'll end up getting a child, it would cost more than 600 € / month. However, he says that the service that you get with the private insurance is a lot better. Does anyone has experience if the service you get with a public insurance is worth the additional cost?

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14 hours ago, Sepisto said:

 However, he says that the service that you get with the private insurance is a lot better. Does anyone has experience if the service you get with a public insurance is worth the additional cost?

 

I've been privately insured and publicly insured. The broker is lying and his motivation is that he gets a juicy commission if you switch. I am not sure what he means by "the service you get", but the quality of health care to private and public patients in Germany is almost identical.

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I am privately insured and the service is exactly the same.  Same doctors, same facilities.

The only real advantage I have seen is that some practices will prioritise private patients.  But not all of them, and often it does not make any difference.

 

When I signed up then private was cheaper for me, and offered these advantages.  But since then the premium has more than doubled.

Also, be aware that private insurance is not capped unlike public insurance.  But the contribution by your employer is capped.  So once the employer hits this cap then it is possible that any increase beyond that will be 100% on you!

 

 

 

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Can confirm. I was private for seven years and have been public for four. I have experienced absolutely no difference in the care I get. Every now and then I may ask for something that the public insurance doesn't automatically cover and the doctor tells me I might have to pay for it, but, so far, I have never gotten a bill. This is likely because I am a relatively good medical consumer and ask for things that are indicated by symptoms or maybe it's just because my doc's billing team is that good.

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second Smaug's comment.

 

I hear so many stories that private patients allegedly get appointments faster, but I have never had trouble getting appointments in a timely manner so whatever.  If they beat me by a day or two, I simply could not care less.  In all urgent cases you will be seen according to your need, not your insurance.

 

there are some doctors who don't accept public cover at all, and again, whatever. The overwhelming majority do so this should not be a problem.

 

if you want to be dealing with a chefarzt in hospital, or have a private room (pending availability) - these things are usually part of private cover - you can buy a supplemental insurance on top of your current public cover.  in fact you can usually buy this straight from the kasse.  

 

 

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In some cases things are easier when you are privately insured, but the opposite can also true. It was, for example, more burocratic (and expensive) for me to get a cochlear implant being privately insured than it would have been had I been a "Kassenpatient". Being private meant extra paperwork, delays as I had to get approval by my insurer, and me paying for part of the costs. I also have to pay for the batteries my implant runs on, while publicly insured patients don't.

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40 minutes ago, lisa13 said:

if you want to be dealing with a chefarzt in hospital

 

I have been under the care of the chief for 3 surgeries with my public insurance. The chiefs head up the departments or their specialties. In each case, they visited me each day. They also oversee many surgeries without actually participating. That is how they teach the students.

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I was visited a few times by a chefarzt in munich's dermatology hospital (how/why one needs a whole hospital for dermatology cases I will never understand...but I digress)

 

he always had a gaggle of students in tow.  As far as I could tell he was not actually there to help me, but to give the students a tour of my full body eczema.  He rarely even spoke to me. I don't even recall him or anyone else asking if it was ok to use me as a teaching tool. 

 

I found it very much not cool and it certainly didn't do squat for my treatment.

 

eta: point being, the whole concept of getting chefarzt treatment is dubious (to me)

 

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I've had them drop by alone or with a couple of students. The point is that people I know who have private insurance think that they are the only ones who see the chefarzt just because she/he comes by their rooms.

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3 hours ago, lisa13 said:

I hear so many stories that private patients allegedly get appointments faster, but I have never had trouble getting appointments in a timely manner so whatever. 

 

Don't move to Berlin. 

 

3 hours ago, lisa13 said:

 In all urgent cases you will be seen according to your need, not your insurance.

 

On the other hand if you suffer from a chronic but not life threatening illness, you sometimes have to wait months for an appointment with a specialist as a Kassenpatient.

 

 

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8 minutes ago, engelchen said:

On the other hand if you suffer from a chronic but not life threatening illness, you sometimes have to wait months for an appointment with a specialist as a Kassenpatient.

 

To preface my comment:  I'm not doubting you!

 

but I have to wonder why this is?  My oversimplified, purely intuitive take:  Munich has, on par I'd guess, far more residents who have the option to go private, so I would expect more of a problem for kasse patients here than there. There are, admittedly, a lot of private practices who won't touch public patients at all unless they pay out of pocket, but there's no shortage of kasse docs and for the most part I haven't been stuck with any stinkers.  I even managed to schedule surgery with a tippy top surgeon within three weeks of my evaluation. (wait for the eval was about 2 weeks if I recall as I didn't want to visit his office out by the airport)  I would not call it an elective surgery, but it was absolutely non-urgent.

 

So what do you think - is it just a lack of docs in Berlin?  Why would that gap swing in your direction but not ours? If you have any hypotheses or info I'm interested :)

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I don´t have an axe to grind. As many of you know, I flog both public and private German insurance and private international. But I am happy that Germany has a pretty comprehensive medical structure available and urgent cases are not turned down for publicly insured. I am ideologically in favour of a system available to all- affordable and comprehensive . I am privately insured and my partner is in the public system.

I can, however, confirm from experience...non-life threatening cases are faster attended to if privately insured.

Two personal examples:

Nicole and I went to our favourite dermatologist in Harburg some years ago. Ladies first: Nicole showed her TK card and got an appointment for three months down the road for a check up.

I was next...showed the lady my private card and was asked to go into another room. A few minutes later, the doc came in, checked me and asked me if I wanted lasering on the spot. I did and he did it.

 

A few years ago in Harburg, I fell over in the snow and hurt my wrist badly.I went for the first time to an Unfallarzt in the area..it was full. The lady said: " we have no time today..come back tomorrow."

I told her it was my first time, showed her my private card and she asked me to go into a different room (coffee available in there ). I waited a few minutes.. then the doc came along, did the checks and then said in English: "it´s broken."

He gave me a number to call of a specialist scan place. I called and the lady on the phone quite simply said: " can you come right now or would you prefer tomorrow morning?"

I went straight away and had all kinds of checks and scans.

 

I am not saying it´s fair, I´m not saying it´s justifiable...it just IS that way...no doubts at all.

 

I am a professional independent insurance broker and authorised advertiser. Contact me.
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1 hour ago, engelchen said:

 

 

Don't move to Berlin. 

 

 

On the other hand if you suffer from a chronic but not life threatening illness, you sometimes have to wait months for an appointment with a specialist as a Kassenpatient.

 

 

 

Depends on where you live. Berlin is a big city.

 

You can't throw a stick in Steglitz without hitting a doctors practice 

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3 hours ago, fraufruit said:

I've had them drop by alone or with a couple of students. The point is that people I know who have private insurance think that they are the only ones who see the chefarzt just because she/he comes by their rooms.

 

totally

 

my point is that even if they do come, it may not be all that ;)

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