Finding an apartment in Leipzig

154 posts in this topic

On 4/8/2019, 5:46:20, Kommentarlos said:

 

Do you know that you also need to register your dog, not just yourself? Just checking.

 

Plus there is a dog tax to bear in mind if it is not yet on your radar.

 

https://www.leipzig.de/buergerservice-und-verwaltung/aemter-und-behoerdengaenge/behoerden-und-dienstleistungen/dienstleistung/hundesteuer-52ea674d694a9/

 

Deepl.com is a better translation program than google translate for contractual and official german. Competent advice from a professional is even better. 

Thanks for that input!  I assumed there must be some kind of Dog license required, but nobody seemed to know who I've spoken with.

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On 4/8/2019, 5:46:20, Kommentarlos said:
On 4/9/2019, 7:20:05, arsenal21 said:

 

Plattenbau are basically slabs of cheap looking concrete stacked on top of one another. You'll only find them in the east and ex-eastern Bloc countries. The walls are thin and the ceilings are low.

 

There's an article on wikipedia about them I'm sure.

 

They were an efficient way of providing cheap housing.  Not the most attractive I'll admit.  I grew up in a New York City Tenement building.  So I honestly don't see the problem.  I will let you know, when I am living there.  Also lived in SF Projects which have since been torn down.  Yes I'd love a lovely old Altbau with beautiful details, and wood floors.  Preferably with an elevator.  I am now in a crumbling Albau with three flights of creaky old stairs.  The Plattenbau looks a heck of a lot better.  It has a beautiful view, and an elevator for this old fart.  I'm sure it has it's drawbacks but right now it's within my budget and convenient.  I was simply concerned about the Company and whether it has a good record or not.  FYI Plattenbaus are not just limited to the Eastern Bloc Countries.  The name maybe, but not the construction technique.  Yes it's on Wikipedia.

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On 4/8/2019, 5:46:20, Kommentarlos said:
On 4/9/2019, 7:20:05, arsenal21 said:

 

Plattenbau are basically slabs of cheap looking concrete stacked on top of one another. You'll only find them in the east and ex-eastern Bloc countries. The walls are thin and the ceilings are low.

 

There's an article on wikipedia about them I'm sure.


They were an efficient way of providing cheap housing.  Not the most attractive I'll admit.  I grew up in a New York City Tenement building.  So I honestly don't see the problem.  I will let you know, when I am living there.  Also lived in SF Projects which have since been torn down.  Yes I'd love a lovely old Altbau with beautiful details, and wood floors.  Preferably with an elevator.  I am now in a crumbling Albau with three flights of creaky old stairs.  The Plattenbau looks a heck of a lot better.  It has a beautiful view, and an elevator for this old fart.  I'm sure it has it's drawbacks but right now it's within my budget and convenient.  I was simply concerned about the Company and whether it has a good record or not.

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While on the subject of Plattenbaus

 

Has anyone had experience with putting in an EBK in one of these units?  I need to put in a kitchen.  I have always been a handyperson.   Did Cabinetwork on the side.  Put in many kitchens!  However this is a new ballgame for me.  I have no idea how these walls are constructed. Also the plumbing is different.  When I owned my own home, if I screwed something up I was responsible only to myself.  Here i do not want to do damage.  Can these walls support cabinets? 

 

Honestly I don't know, whether they can or how they are constructed.  Concrete?  Lath and plaster?  Pipes and wires?   I will most likely need a contractor.  Any input there as to reputable ones.  Would be appreciated.

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14 minutes ago, kenny1948 said:

I have no idea how these walls are constructed.

 

Concrete. The walls, the floors, the ceilings. All made of precast concrete.

 

 

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a schlagbohrmachine is your best friend in a German apartment :)

 

(eta:  at least in a non-altbau - no idea how altbau walls are constructed)

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3 hours ago, kenny1948 said:

They were an efficient way of providing cheap housing.  Not the most attractive I'll admit.  I grew up in a New York City Tenement building.  So I honestly don't see the problem.  I will let you know, when I am living there.  Also lived in SF Projects which have since been torn down.  Yes I'd love a lovely old Altbau with beautiful details, and wood floors.  Preferably with an elevator.  I am now in a crumbling Albau with three flights of creaky old stairs.  The Plattenbau looks a heck of a lot better.  It has a beautiful view, and an elevator for this old fart.  I'm sure it has it's drawbacks but right now it's within my budget and convenient.  I was simply concerned about the Company and whether it has a good record or not.  FYI Plattenbaus are not just limited to the Eastern Bloc Countries.  The name maybe, but not the construction technique.  Yes it's on Wikipedia.

Dog ok?

 

On 10/04/2019, 00:18:32, arsenal21 said:

 

The big cities in the former East are probably comparable with western prices but if you look at smaller towns and villages away from the cities there are much lower prices for renting and buying.

 

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On ‎09‎.‎04‎.‎2019‎ ‎07‎:‎20‎:‎05, arsenal21 said:

 

Plattenbau are basically slabs of cheap looking concrete stacked on top of one another. You'll only find them in the east and ex-eastern Bloc countries. The walls are thin and the ceilings are low.

 

There's an article on wikipedia about them I'm sure.

 

Not really true.  From WIKI (your recommendation !):     

Plattenbau (plural: Plattenbauten, German: Platte + Bau, lit. 'panel/slab' + 'building/ construction') is a building constructed of large, prefabricated concrete slabs. The word is a compound of Platte (in this context: panel) and Bau (building).

Although Plattenbauten are often considered to be typical of East Germany, the prefabricated construction method was used extensively in West Germany and elsewhere, particularly in public housing (see tower block). In English the building method is also called large panel system-building or LPS.  Prefabrication was pioneered in the Netherlands following World War I, based on construction methods developed in the United States. The first German use of plattenbau construction is what is now known as the Splanemann-Siedlung in Berlin's Lichtenberg district, constructed in 1926–1930

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21 hours ago, kenny1948 said:

Here i do not want to do damage

Before you even touch a screwdriver I´d suggest you take out liability insurance (they are cheap - my mom paid below € 40/year). The´d cover any damage you cause to others (unless done on purpose or gross negligence - and some even over the latter).

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On 4/9/2019, 6:59:45, fraufruit said:

I must say that the terms East and West Germany are no longer relevant.

That´s not exactly true. There is are still quite a few remains of the wall in people´s heads. Just look at the political landscape for instance. 40 years of communistic suppression with no private property (or at least hardly any) didn´t go away without leaving traces.

 

On 4/9/2019, 7:20:13, fraufruit said:

Rabenmutter is an outdated term that is still used by the, shall we say, less intelligent people.

Also not exactly true.

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18 hours ago, Ensnaturae said:

Dog ok?

That depends on your lease contract. It may be negotiable.

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21 hours ago, kenny1948 said:

I'm sure it has it's drawbacks

One of them will probably be high heating costs (due to lack of proper insulation) unless it has been renovated properly and lack of noise insulation (probably even if renovated). Shortly after reunification I was offered a Plattenbau apartment in the East and there you could hear the people living above you using the toilet.

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12 hours ago, garyh911 said:

 

Not really true.  From WIKI (your recommendation !):     

Plattenbau (plural: Plattenbauten, German: Platte + Bau, lit. 'panel/slab' + 'building/ construction') is a building constructed of large, prefabricated concrete slabs. The word is a compound of Platte (in this context: panel) and Bau (building).

Although Plattenbauten are often considered to be typical of East Germany, the prefabricated construction method was used extensively in West Germany and elsewhere, particularly in public housing (see tower block). In English the building method is also called large panel system-building or LPS.  Prefabrication was pioneered in the Netherlands following World War I, based on construction methods developed in the United States. The first German use of plattenbau construction is what is now known as the Splanemann-Siedlung in Berlin's Lichtenberg district, constructed in 1926–1930

I doubt that this article was written by a native speaker. Plattenbau is clearly associated with buildings in the former GDR. While the same or very similiar construction was done in the West it would be referred to as e. g. Betonfertigbau.

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Well, this thread seems to have taken on a life of itself!   I am happily ensconced in my Plattenbau apartment!  Have been here eight months already.  The neighbors are all nice, some young students, some old farts like me, and some immigrant families.  All are friendly, and all love my Fett Hund!  They think he is funny and cute.   My ceiling is acutally a foot higher than it was in my house in NC!  So I don't find that a problem.  I have a wonderful view.  I do worry about the heating costs, but will find out, when I do!  Have kept the radiator at 3 since the middle of November.  Somewhere I read that you should keep it at one temp, and not keep turning it lower. That they use a Thermstat, and go by the temperature of the room. I will find out!  They do not stay hot all the time!  As far as concrete slabs, I am still seeing new apartments built this way! I am sure the apartments are fancier, but also more costly.  Two of my new friends live in one, and I don't really see where theirs is all that nicer than mine.  Except they have floor heating.

 

I have all the insurance that was required.  I also invested in a schlagbormaschine almost immediately.  It is a necessity with these hard as rock walls!  My IKEA kitchen was installed, by a crew.  I wasn't even going to try!  Yes I hear noises, but even in the states, I could hear my neighbors.  Not really that bad, except when they drop something upstairs.  I think they have a little kid, who throws stuff.  It really doesn't bother me, as I normally have the stereo playing.  No complaints so far about the dog.  He barks now and then, if he hears something out in the hall but otherwise he's well behaved.  The building is well maintained and have had no problems so far.  Buddy has his registration, and I have paid the dog tax.  I do need to get him to a vet though, to obtain a EU Pet Passport as it's required to visit some countries.  So far we have been to the Czech Republic three times with no problem, and to a few places here in Germany with no problem.  I have never been told to put a muzzle on him, except once on a local bus here.

 

I have a nice group of friends, who are willing to help me when I need it.  We get together once or twice a week.  Go for long walks, and road trips.  So am quite satisfied with my situation here.  By the way, this East West thing.  What I notice most, is that here people either do not speak any English, or refuse to.  It's quite funny, how I use my awful German to request something because they have said they don't speak English, but then they answer in perfect English!  As for the economy, it seems to be better here, than where I lived in North Carolina.  Seems people are well dressed, and the stores are always busy.  In North Carolina we had very few stores other than a Walmart, and most of the people looked very poor!                                        

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Wow! Glad that you have settled in so well and are happy with your place and neighbors, etc.

 

Have a great Xmas.

 

Oh, and you may change your location on your profile now. :P

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Wow - 8 months already?!  

 

thanks for the update - so glad to hear you're doing well and enjoying your "new" life.  Just tickled :)

 

happy holidays 

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5 hours ago, kenny1948 said:

Well, this thread seems to have taken on a life of itself!   I am happily ensconced ...

WOW! Exciting Kenny!  Over a year ago you and I were on here trying to get questions answered and sort through how to take the plunge.  We each managed to get BKK health insurance a major feat), and we are both happily here with our dogs! :D  Enjoy your Christmas in Deutschland and Happy New Year.

 

and like Fraufruit said „you may change your location on your profile now“.  I found that step to be SO exciting.  I came over in June, got insured in August, and my official residency card arrived in November.  

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On 12/20/2019, 12:23:14, fraufruit said:

Wow! Glad that you have settled in so well and are happy with your place and neighbors, etc.

 

Have a great Xmas.

 

Oh, and you may change your location on your profile now. :P

 

OOPS!  I guess this Old Fart, isn't as Social Media savvy as he thought!  Thanks for the heads up.  Sorry, I just now saw this post.  I guess I really need to visit more often.  Thank you!

 

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On 12/20/2019, 2:02:36, lisa13 said:

Wow - 8 months already?!  

 

thanks for the update - so glad to hear you're doing well and enjoying your "new" life.  Just tickled :)

 

happy holidays 

 

Thanks!  Hope yours were oo!

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On 12/20/2019, 4:40:39, BethAnnBitt said:

 

 

and like Fraufruit said „you may change your location on your profile now“.  I found that step to be SO exciting.  I came over in June, got insured in August, and my official residency card arrived in November.  

 

Well, I just did.  I guess it's an age thing.  I go on here post stuff, and then don't visit again for months!  Yes I finally updated my profile.  I should visit more often!

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