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Recruitment companies in Nuremberg

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Can anyone suggest recruitment companies with offices in Nuremberg? I tried googling and searched on here but I'm not coming up with much.

 

As my Deutsch skills are beginner level (I start A1.1 next week) it would be great to find a recruiter who has good English. I realise my job prospects are severely limited until my Deutsch improves, but I know there are some companies out there willing to take on native English speakers - so I'm looking for recruitment companies to talk to.

 

FYI, my background is in project management, mainly for government clients.

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Unless you have some out-of-this-world qualifications, your chances are - unfortunately - basically nil. Sorry to be harsh, but to get a work permit, you will need to pass the Vorrangprüfung (more info on that here). With a good supply of people in Germany (and the EU) that speak both German and English, and do project management, it will be extremely unlikely that you'll find employment.

 

Why Germany?

 

EDIT: Ah right, just looked at your profile and see you moved here with your fiancé, who's also a Kiwi. Just to make sure you're aware of this small complication: Since you came into Germany at the beginning of November 2013, you've just about used up your 180 days as a tourist and will need to leave Germany (and the Schengen zone) for 180 days, before being allowed back in for another 180 days.

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Yeah, I've worked that out from reading around. But never say never, right? My plan, now, is to focus on the language first but I'm still interested in finding out what opportunities are out there.

 

I moved here with my fiancé who has a job with a German company near Nürnberg. They were prepared to take him on without him knowing the language (he completed A1.1 on arrival, then started work, and will continue with A1.2 and so on in his own time). But, he has specialist knowledge in his industry, and he knew some people at the company through his previous job, so he was able to lock in the job before we moved.

 

The job was the vehicle for us to experience living in Europe for a couple of years. The grass is always greener etc… but if I had a euro for every person who has expressed surprise/confusion at our swapping New Zealand for Nürnberg, I could give up the job search right now :)

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As my Deutsch skills are beginner level (I start A1.1 next week) it would be great to find a recruiter who has good English. I realise my job prospects are severely limited until my Deutsch improves, but I know there are some companies out there willing to take on native English speakers - so I'm looking for recruitment companies to talk to.

 

It is not legally possible to obtain a work permit to work directly for a temp agency/recruiter, therefore, the recruiters are generally not interested in non-EU candidates without an open work permit (with the exception of certain IT specialists and engineers for difficult to fill positions).

 

 

FYI, my background is in project management, mainly for government clients.

 

Without fluent C2 German you can forget about working for the government.

 

 

Yeah, I've worked that out from reading around. But never say never, right? My plan, now, is to focus on the language first but I'm still interested in finding out what opportunities are out there.

 

Then you should apply for a permit to learn the language ASAP.

 

 

I moved here with my fiancé who has a job with a German company near Nürnberg. They were prepared to take him on without him knowing the language (he completed A1.1 on arrival, then started work, and will continue with A1.2 and so on in his own time). But, he has specialist knowledge in his industry, and he knew some people at the company through his previous job, so he was able to lock in the job before we moved.

 

Let me guess, he has a technical Background?

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I am already learning the language 4 days a week at an Intensivkurs, supplemented by online study.

 

Yes, he has a technical background, although the industry he is in now is different from the one he has a degree in.

 

I didn't say I wanted to work for the government, I said that was where my experience was mainly from (as a management consultant to the public sector). A good PM is adaptable.

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maybe you need to start with the integration course once your visa issue is sorted out.

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EDIT: Ah right, just looked at your profile and see you moved here with your fiancé, who's also a Kiwi. Just to make sure you're aware of this small complication: Since you came into Germany at the beginning of November 2013, you've just about used up your 180 days as a tourist and will need to leave Germany (and the Schengen zone) for 180 days, before being allowed back in for another 180 days.

 

90 days? Yes that ran out a few days ago, but we already had our visa appointment locked in (for this morning, actually). Visa sorted (work visa for him, residence for me).

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I didn't say I wanted to work for the government, I said that was where my experience was mainly from (as a management consultant to the public sector). A good PM is adaptable.

 

You might be adaptable, however, the problem is that German companies, especially the Mittelstand, isn't.

 

Although some companies might be willing to make exceptions for foreigners with technical skills, for the most part they expect to be advised in German and there are not enough for consultancies to hire management consultants who can’t speak the local language. Based on conversations I’ve had with managers and hr staff in consultancies here, I think you’d need C1/C2 German to be taken seriously.

 

Disclaimer: Every now and then newbies accuse those of us who provide realistic and accurate advice of trying to discourage other foreigners from coming here because we are afraid of the competition. For the record, although I would like to get into management consulting for the public sector here, I'm not saying that it is difficult to discourage you because I'm afraid of the competition; it'll probably take you at least two years until you learn German well enough to get into this area.

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