I'd like to share my story about my trip to Munich

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Hello.

 

I wanted to share the story about my experience visiting Munich. My dad met my mother in Munich almost 50 years ago. He was in the Army (United States). He grew up in small town Mississippi, United States.

 

There is a long story about him meeting my mom. I'm not going to share it right now. I have to be honest with all of you, I'm not sure how many of you are native English speakers, how many are proficient in conversational English, all I know is that I've searched for English language message boards where people talk about Germany, and this is the most popular site that I could find.

 

I speak no German. My mother refused to teach me German as I was growing up. I've long regretted that I never took up the pursuit of her native language on my own. I am thinking about trying to find classes at a local university.

 

My trip to Munich was amazing. The country is beautiful. Please understand that in Munich, there are as many people as there are in the entire state of Mississippi (where I live).

 

There are really too many things to talk about, I'm sure that it would bore you to hear someone talk about your home city. I can say that it is gorgeous. If I had the job skills to move to Munich, I would do my best to make that happen. I loved it that much. I felt very bad about not being able to speak German. I felt like I was rude.

 

I basically just wanted to tell anyone here that is in Munich, your city is awesome. I've been daydreaming about what it would be like to live there ever since I went.

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I'm not sure how many of you are native English speakers

 

I am 100% certain that you will find the majority of us to be "native" English speakers, although one could take the trouble to argue about the true definition of "native", but at the end of the day, who cares?

 

So, you came to Munich and loved the place.

Me too, and that's why I stayed here, have learned the language, and made my life here in Bayern.

 

If the only point behind your "blog" was to say that Munich is a nice place, then I cannot help but wonder why you bothered? A blog is normally a bit more than a postcard!

On the other hand, if it has inspired you to start learning German, with a potential aim of moving here, then good for you!

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I'm looking forward to an extension of the original post, with backstory about parents and more specific reports on experiences in beautiful Munich.

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I'm looking forward to what was promised in the title. When will the story begin?

 

Despite the name, this site is not just about Munich; we don't all live there. http://www.toytowngermany.com/xtra/maps/members.html

And I'm sure most of those who do would appreciate being taken back on a trip down memory lane to the day they first arrived and the first impressions they got.

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Oh, wow! This is my personal blog.. ok! I will add some pictures tomorrow and try to talk more in depth about the week I got to spend in Germany. My apologies, I am very familiar with discussion forums, but it always takes some time to learn the rules of conduct in practice... I promise I'll make it up to those of you who are kind enough to check back in with me.

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I really liked how your Dad wooed your mom. Very Army like and romantic. Keep narrating your perspective of Munich. Help us folks living up north in Germany.

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Thank you, Mississippian. The story about your parents was sweet. They must have been pretty young, which would explain their willingness to walk all over, including the Burghausen trip (which I took when I still had my two natural knees and which is lovely). Since you've chosen to introduce yourself by starting at the beginning, please continue. Even if you're never able to come to Munich permanently, you've caught our interest as a Friend of Germany.

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It's a nice story and I'm glad you liked Munich so much, however this statement:

 

 

Please understand that in Munich, there are as many people as there are in the entire state of Mississippi (where I live).

 

is not correct. Mississippi has a population of close to 3 million people, whereas Munich has nowhere near that number, more like 1.3 million. It probably just seemed more populous as all those people are crammed into a much smaller space.

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Mississippian,

 

give me ring or a PM when you come back for a visit. My grandparents came from Mississippi, somewhere around Tishomingo, if I remember right.

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Mississippi has a population of close to 3 million people, whereas Munich has nowhere near that number, more like 1.3 million. It probably just seemed more populous as all those people are crammed into a much smaller space.

Perhaps the OP went to Marienplatz on a Saturday in December :).

 

PS- Munich passed the 1.4 million threshold this year.

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Tell more, Mississippian! What a lovely, curious and funny person you seem to be! And a born story-teller! I like people like you!

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Great news! My parents have decided to return to Munich this fall! I won't be able to make the trip with them, though. I can't afford the trip at this point...

 

...but they're going back next year! I really hope to make it next year. I'm so excited. I'm going to study Google Maps so that I can memorize the layout of the city. I'm going to cram as much basic knowledge as I can in two years... I'm going to try to lose weight so that I don't feel like Shrek at all times over there. Was Shrek a hit in Germany?

 

I'm fascinated by Ludwig II after going to his castle. His story is amazing. What are the theories on his death? I've seen his location of death and the surrounding circumstantial evidence, but I've never seen any theories on what happened.

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I live just near to Possenhosen, where Ludwig built a Schloß for his lover.

Apparently, he walked into Lake Starnberg on the other side (maybe to come and see Sissi), but at some stage forgot to swim.

Maybe he was helped to drown and maybe not - who knows?

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He's a mystery! He's so fascinating.

 

I'm trying to figure out what all I want to see when I go back one day. Man, I miss Germany. I never in my life thought I'd be able to go over there.

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Love your story, Mississippian!

 

Books have been written about King Ludwig's death: was it an accident, suicide or murder? There's even a secret society associated with it: the Guglmänner ("Gugl" men). See here and here.

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Thanks. I'm really fascinated by that sort of thing.

 

I can't say enough how magical Munich is in that it's a combination of a huge, modern city and a small town. I've never seen anything like that. In the States, the larger cities are busy to the point that there's no interaction with anyone. Everyone is so busy with their big city life that they have no time for strangers. That outlook on life is completely foreign to me as a Southerner. If you have ever heard anything (which I'm not so bold to assume that you have) about the Southern United States and our hospitality, I can tell you that what you've heard is true. It's not uncommon at all to just walk up to someone in a store and start a conversation with them about whatever they (or you) are looking at and it could turn into a ten minute conversation about absolutely nothing of importance.

 

The reason I'm explaining that is to say that, to my surprise, we ran into that attitude of friendliness in Munich a noticeable amount. There weren't many conversations started up with strangers, but there were a lot of really nice people. There were a lot of business owners or workers who had absolutely no time to small talk, but no more than you'd run into here in the States in a larger city.

 

I have a couple of stories that were funny to me. Keep in mind that my sense of humor is a little out of the ordinary.

 

Both of them happened at Herrenchiemsee Palace (I apologize if I've spelled that incorrectly).

 

Story 1 - We got off the boat and walked up to the place where you get onto the carriage. We would have walked to the castle, but my mother has a physical complication and my daughter was fascinated by the horses, so we took the ride. I can't really explain how amazing the sight was when we came to the castle. The word "breathtaking" does not do it justice. I still cannot believe how amazing the entire place was... the grounds were beautiful, the statues around and in the water were just amazing. Everything about it was beautiful.

 

I do have to say that when I went through the English speaking tour, and I touched on this earlier, but I was really upset with some of my fellow tourists. They were (what I considered to be) extremely rude by pointing and talking during the tour. It was to the point that my wife and I had to stand as close as possible to the guide to ignore the group that was chatting. Our guide was, to say it again, such a vibrant and pleasant person.

 

And that is something that Germany should be proud of, my friends. Here I am telling you a story about what you all know is a marvel of architecture and design, the inside is full of sights and crafted items which are just amazing, and what I keep recalling the most vividly is the young German lady who told us the history of the rooms. As beautiful as your designed objects and engineered technology is, your people are and will always be the best thing about your home land.

 

ANYWAY!!! Here's the part that was funny to me. We left the tour. Got onto the horse drawn carriage to go back to the boat. The driver of the carriage starts chatting with my mother, my uncle, and my aunt. The mosquitoes are just eating us all up, they were very bad. I'm watching all of the conversation between my family and the driver, and I have no idea what they are saying. I'm just listening to the beautiful sounds of the German language... and then all of a sudden, the driver's eyes get kind of big. He is visibly shaken. My aunt and my uncle start laughing. My mom starts laughing. The driver walks away.

 

I ask my mom what happened. She says that they were talking about how we have mosquitoes in Mississippi. The driver told them that he was afraid that we all had AIDS since we were from Mississippi, and he was apparently afraid that we had somehow infected him. He may have been playing a joke, because he came back a few minutes later and started talking again. He was a very animated guy

 

Story 2 - This one is not as funny or as long winded as the first story. This story is very simple: when we were leaving, there was a place where you could feed ducks and geese. My aunt gave me a bag of bread crumbs to feed the ducks with my daughter. We were feeding, and a couple came near with their two children, two young girls. My daughter offered the bag to the girls, so that they could have bread to feed the ducks, too. So there we were, feeding ducks and geese with some German girls while their parents smiled and took pictures of their daughters as the ducks ate from their hands. That was a good moment for me.

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@Mississippian,

 

you are ruining it for the more negative inclined here :D .

 

Your awe and open appreciation are certainly catching and remind me of what I experienced and felt in the first weeks of my now rather long stay. I am also since somewhat gnarled and bent by all the assumed affronts and supposed negatives that I feel to have experienced while being here. However, that is my perspective and indeed colored by events of which only a few really have anything to do with Germany per se. Reading your upbeat description of your experiences does restore some of the color for me and I am sure for many others here as well.

 

So, please keep the anecdotes coming! :)

 

Ya'll take now, y'hear!

;)

 

P.S. ya'll might wanna check out Franken (Franconia) too, for example: Würzburg

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