English speaking groups for children in Wurzburg

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Hi Everyone,

 

We are very likely to be moving to Germany from the US (we are British) in the next few months and we are trying to decide where we need to be based. Würzburg would be the ideal location for its proximity to my husbands work location but I'm looking to get more information about what is available. We have two children who will be 4 and 2 when we move so my eldest needs a place in Kindergarten. Are there any bilingual kindergarten options in Würzburg? I like to be able to get out of the house everyday and would like to live somewhere where there are toddler groups, music classes and if possible things like swimming and gymnastics for us to go to. For the first 6-12 months it would be nice to have this in English and then eventually we could transition to German groups. Is there anything like this available in Würzburg?

 

Thanks.

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I'd also like to ask the same questions about Aschaffenburg, I am unable to edit the topic title though.

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Hi Relo2,

 

I have lived in the region just west of Würzburg for the past 25+ years and have sadly not heard of institutions that provide full English services next to German. I have heard that many local Kindergärten give rudimentary English lessons, just to be modern and hip, but full fledged English speaking is in my experience not exactly a strong point in Franken (Franconia).

 

A quick google gave a reference to a similar topic here in TT: http://www.toytowngermany.com/lofi/index.php/t279054.html

 

I am going to have to assume that you will probably have better luck either towards Nürnberg or Aschaffenburg.

 

A bit of rambling now ...

 

I am not an expert, but I have heard many times that children in that age are very flexible and adjust very quickly to new languages. The general consensus seems to be that it is important that key people speak only in a particular language with them. The children than have an anchor for orientation and, after a bit of stumbling in the beginning they quickly and fluidly switch between the languages. As I understand it, it is important that those key people don't switch languages for the children, but stay in one and only that one. Though dropping them in a German speaking environment cold turkey might seem a bit hard, I do believe that it is the best way to learn to swim.

 

I can also say from experience (my children are now 20, 16, 14) that you will run into Kindergarten teachers who, let's be nice about it, are not exactly on top of the latest teaching methods. They being German will also my mean that they will be very adamant about their outdated opinions and methods. Just smile & nod, do your thing, as you see fit while ignoring them as best as possible. Getting upset will only cause you gray hairs and not change anything - Germans are change resistant (many at least). Oh, and don't try to argue, it is simply pointless. Think of them as nasty little storms that you have to drive through regularly. Getting away from them is very refreshing. ;-)

 

Sorry I couldn't help more.

LostInEurope01

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Thank you for your reply, it is very helpful. I'm still unsure as to what to do about schooling as it will only be a 2 or 3 year assignment and they start school a year later than the US.

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