Moving to Frankfurt and my situation is unique

157 posts in this topic

 

Secondly, how is the unemployment rate and cost of living in Frankfurt?

 

Frankfurt is one of the most expensive cities in Germany.

 

 

Thirdly, how is the crime rate in Frankfurt

 

Frankfurt has the highest crime rate in Germany.

http://www.thelocal.de/society/20130513-49671.html

 

However, if you compare it to London or Paris, then Frankfurt will be cheap and safe.

 

 

Whereas in Singapore the government more or less tells you what to do and how to do it, Germany is not like that.

 

Sure, and you don't get a ticket for parking on the left side of the road on Sunday.

 

 

The unemployment rate is higher here than in Singapore. English and Mandarin are standard in Singapore. Here you have to speak German.

 

You don't have to. There is no law which forces you to speak German, fortunately (unless you are a government official). If we speak about chances of finding a decent job without German skills, then it depends on a field. I think, Frankfurt is quite international in comparison to other cities, so chances of finding a job with English should be very high.

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I think, Frankfurt is quite international in comparison to other cities, so chances of finding a job with English should be very high.

 

I disagre, it really depends on the field. For example, the chances of finding a good position in the health care field without German is very low. Furthermore, many lawyers have reported difficulty in finding employment in Germany without speaking German (with the exception of certain lawyers specialised in international contract law etc). There are also only a limited number of management positions that don't require German.

 

On the other hand, experienced engineers and IT specialists have a chance of finding a job without knowing German.

 

Since the OP didn't bother to mention what he actually does, it is impossible for any of us to predict his chances of finding a job.

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I didn't know non-EU citizens couldn't work for the ECB.

 

All the really good positions I've seen advertised at the ECB (as well as other EU institutions) were restriced to EU citizens with the exception of shrot-term Visiting Scholars.

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Hi Everyone,

 

I am going to relocate to Frankfurt in couple of months. I have a few questions, appreciate if i can get a response for it:

 

1. What are the safe neighborhoods/areas to live in Frankfurt within the city ( Budget 600-900 Euros, 2 Bed rooms ) , appreciate any links.

2. What is the best way of public commuting within the city

3. What are the average costs in Frankfurt

4. My wife is going to look for HR jobs and speaks English, any suggestions for the same?

 

thanks in advance for the help.

 

Kind Regards,

VD

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yes all these questions are answered about a million times in previous posts. Being in HR in Germany and not being able to speak German - imagine being in London and not speaking English. Answers the question on chances of getting a job.

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It really is true, you must go to the SEARCH button, top right, and search for relocation, moving to Frankfurt, etc. The same questions are asked almost daily by newcomers and members don't always have the time to answer everyone individually. (I'm retired, but I can't answer questions because I no longer live in Germany.) So make yourself comfy with the search function. It will be your first Toytown friend.

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1. What are the safe neighborhoods/areas to live in Frankfurt within the city ( Budget 600-900 Euros, 2 Bed rooms ) , appreciate any links.

 

Search for living+frankfurt

 

Before you do anything else about accommodation, please read this TT Wiki page on renting in Germany. There are a few pitfalls and differences you need to know about, that are probably different from what you're used to. The page also gives tips on where to look and help with vocabulary used in rental ads.

 

For a 2-bedroom flat, you'll be spending at the upper end of your budget - but be aware that set-up costs can be much higher, as you will need to budget your first month's rent, plus Kaution (deposit), which is generally 2-3 months Kaltmiete, plus possibly the agent's commission (2.38 x Kaltmiete). And in unfurnished flats, you will need to calculate buying and installing a kitchen (unless the ad specifies EBK = Einbauküche = fitted kitchen) and light fittings.

 

BTW, Germans don't refer to flats by number of bedrooms, but by number of rooms total (kitchen and bath don't count, so a 2-bedroom flat is known here as a 3-room flat, i.e. living room and 2 bedrooms).

 

 

2. What is the best way of public commuting within the city

 

Here's the link to the RMV - you can switch to English or other languages as well.

 

 

3. What are the average costs in Frankfurt

 

Search results cost+living+frankfurt

 

 

4. My wife is going to look for HR jobs and speaks English, any suggestions for the same?

 

 

 

Being in HR in Germany and not being able to speak German - imagine being in London and not speaking English. Answers the question on chances of getting a job.

 

That about covers it, tbh. Not only will your wife need at least some German, but to work in HR she will need knowledge of German labour law etc.

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[adminmerge][/adminmerge]

 

Hi all,

 

I have been reading this forum for a few weeks now, and I think it would be the perfect place to get some advice on moving to Germany.

I’m seriously considering moving Germany next July/August. My partner and I have decided to move to Germany for jobs and hopefully a better style of living, as we are currently both living in Northern Ireland where salary and job prospects are low. Frankfurt seems to be the most likely place we will go, due to amount of computing/game development jobs there and that when we visited Germany we preferred the more southern places. We have already started a 10 week beginner German class at a local language centre.

 

Ok, so here is a bit of background about me and my family. I recently graduated with a 2:1 in Computer Games Development; my partner is doing the same degree and will complete it next May. We have a 10 month old daughter, and we are expecting our second in June.

 

Regards salary, I found a few posts on this forum detailing this and came across that the average young professional would be on around €40,000 approx €3,300/per month gross. Is this correct? I’m surprised at this as at home I would be expecting £18-20,000. Using the salary calculator, (Calculator), it becomes around €2,335/per month net. Using the following:

Tax Category: III I will be married by the time I move, also my partner will not be working for the first few months due to looking after new baby.

Children: 2.0 (I don’t understand the 0.5 intervals, being pregnant maybe?)

Church Tax: 9% (This is new to me but I’m willing to pay towards the Church)

I assume you must take the pension/unemployment insurance

Health Insurance Rate, What are the different rates for? (15.5% and 14.9%)

Because we will be moving over with a new baby my partner will not be working for the first few months, so I would be the only income. We are not looking to live a luxury life in those months.

 

Most importantly would this be enough to live on? Even for just a few months while we get sttled and my partner gets a similar job. The main worry is rent, as to rent a house/apartment for a family of 4 will be expensive. I don’t mind a commute from outside Frankfurt if it was cheaper. But from my reading rent can be expensive, due to the deposits, fees and charges.

 

I apologise for the wall of text but as you can see I’m starting my planning early to make sure things can work out instead of rushing into a new country without knowing anything.

Any help would be great.

Regard,

Phil

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Hello Phil! The best advice I can give ( because I know nothing about living costs in the Frankfurt area) is to make sure you really DO get married before you come here. Why is that? Because once you get a salaried job and thus can get into German public health insurance, your then wife and children will be co-insured free of charge.

 

As an employee, public health is based on 15.5% of your gross income ( of which the employer pays just under half) and freelancers/self-employers are usually assessed at 14.9% of gross income - and you pay it all yourself.

 

If you are not married, you would have the nightmare scenario of your wife and children all having to pay for either public or private insurance - and it´s expensive. There is NO NHS here!

 

Church tax is voluntary - you can opt out.

 

Good luck!

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Hi John,

Thanks for the quick reply and useful information.

 

That clears up the Health care part, luckily I'm getting married in 41 days time. So having to pay just over half of the 15.5% to cover my whole family does make a difference.

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My partner and I have decided to move to Germany for jobs and hopefully a better style of living, as we are currently both living in Northern Ireland where salary and job prospects are low.

 

What is the child care situation like there? Is it difficult for mothers without work experience to find a job?

 

 

We have a 10 month old daughter, and we are expecting our second in June.

 

There is a shortage of child care spaces in the area and German employers are notoriously leery of hiring mothers of young children.

 

 

Because we will be moving over with a new baby my partner will not be working for the first few months, so I would be the only income. We are not looking to live a luxury life in those months.

 

I think it will be very difficult for a recent female graduate with young children to find a job here. Would your (future) wife be happy staying at home?

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What is the child care situation like there? Is it difficult for mothers without work experience to find a job?

Childcare here is around £150/per week for one child full time. My partner already has a year work experience, but the low salaries here would mean it would hardy be affordable to work and pay childcare.

 

 

There is a shortage of child care spaces in the area and German employers are notoriously leery of hiring mothers of young children.I think it will be very difficult for a recent female graduate with young children to find a job here. Would your (future) wife be happy staying at home?

 

I think if I got a good job and if finding childcare is a problem, that my partner would be happy to stay at home. Our ideal scenario would be for us both to work, in order for us to pay back our student loans. Is it really that bad in Frankfurt for childcare/hiring mothers? Would it benifit to move to another city or is it the same everywhere in Germany?

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Hi,

 

Just wondering if anyone has any useful advise about my post above.

 

While I was reading up about working mothers in Germany, I came across several articles talking about "Rabenmutter". Suggesting if women with children that want to work are stereotyped as bad mothers. Is this true, or some old wife's tale?

 

I don't like the idea that if we moved to Germany and my partner returns to work, that she may be viewed as a bad mother. Why should she be punished for wanting to use her skills from her degree to find work. At home its very normal for women to return to work after having children and people don't judge them as they are actually befitting their families by going to work.

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Is it really that bad in Frankfurt for childcare/hiring mothers?

 

Yes, there is a rather large shortage of childcare options in FFM.

 

 

Would it benifit to move to another city or is it the same everywhere in Germany?

 

Not really, the areas where there is the highest demand for places are also the areas where there are the most jobs. As of August 1, 2013, children over 12 months have a legal right to a childcare place, unfortunately Germany needs at least 100,000 more places to meet the demand (and its legal commitment).

 

 

While I was reading up about working mothers in Germany, I came across several articles talking about "Rabenmutter". Suggesting if women with children that want to work are stereotyped as bad mothers. Is this true, or some old wife's tale?

 

Germany has a relatively low rate of working mothers among OECD countries and some Germans still feel that women with children should stay home. <_<

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I think she shouldn´t care what the others say. Many mothers really want to stay home, almost everywhere at work u hear women who say they can´t wait to have kids and stay home.

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Is it really that bad in Frankfurt for childcare/hiring mothers?

 

It's true. But if you choose to live out of the city, in one of the many smaller ones around (Taunus area for example), the situation is not nearly as bad.

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Thanks for your replies. Some worrying information, but I'm sure I'll sort something out. It all depends where I can get a job.

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