Moving to Regensburg area in December w/o job

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Purely from German language perspective, i started my B1 in january this year and today i have my B1 cert. Still it is not enough for me to work as the fluency and confidence to handle different situations ,to play with words, sentences and the nuances of german language are still missing. Now i am going to enroll for B2 or beruflich Deutsch. So unless you are already speaking decent german or you have an excellent memory/ brains - i dont expect you to be learning job quality C1 german in 2-3 months - no way - sorry to say that.

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He could find a language school that has housing. I recommend the language school in the Pustet Passage.

 

Are all language schools there so expensive?

 

 

Is there no way to skip the levels in taking the tests for language placement? I mean, can I just skip to B1 certification if I can pass a placement exam or show an aptitude for the language before I start taking the course? Otherwise, I would be hard pressed to find the German equivalent levels like A1 to B1... I will make sure also to find out what the appropriate level is for the studies at Weihenstephan. My friend in Regensburg said the highest level for english is the A level, but it sounds like it is opposite for german (that being the C level is highest).

 

I don’t know what your friend is talking about, however, we’ve been using the European Framework of Reference for Languages. I think you should take an online placement test to determine your level of German. Although any good language school will also insist on testing you themselves before you start with them, it is good to have an idea now. There is no point of coming with only A1 German if you can only afford to stay for 2 months.

 

 

With the topic of welfare brought into the discussion...is this an available option, what with the lack of a ready ability to work as a foreigner?

 

You’ve got to be kidding!?!? Why should the German tax payers support a foreigner who has absolutely no connection to the country? :blink: It should be enough that higher education is already highly subsidised and foreign students generally do not have to pay more than the locals. Study permits usually come with a clause explicitly indicating that the permit will become void if the student receives welfare. If you can’t afford to finance your studies, you should save until you have enough funds to move here.

 

 

I will also be looking into the free courses I mentioned and also about others that are definite, such as TUM which advertises free courses during their own semester periods. (But that is from October - March and April - September.)

 

Forget the free courses, you can't afford them. The university courses generally only cover one level per semester and you'll still need to cover all your living expenses. Furthermore, many university language courses are reserved for registered students.

 

 

I am currently 34, but I have the feeling that I would need to contact the college or school directly to see about eligibility requirements, as I have not seen any age cut-offs advertised.

 

I don’t think they are allowed to have official age cut-offs for admission, however, you never know whether it’ll be a factor when they make their decision. It is actually more likely that even if you meet their minimum language requirement, you’ll be lower on their list than those who have a better understanding of German. It really depends on how competitive the programme is. More importantly, you are too old for student public health insurance once you are registered at the university and will not be eligible for many student discounts (which means you should buget more).

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I brought up the welfare question because I have seen the "gypsies" in Berlin that receive the same, even though they are foreigners who do not work. I understand that a student visa would be void though, even though I believe I would not be required one during the 90 days I am allowed to be in country as a US citizen. I did not mean to offend you, I am just trying to understand the culture and the applicable laws relevant to my potential situation.

 

Here are my main reasons/goals behind going to Germany: spending more time with the friends I have made who live there, and experience life in Germany for a while, to decide if I would want to risk everything in order to make my move more permanent. I may be 34, but I am basically starting from scratch here with only supervisory skills and some electronics experience to claim towards any job. My dream is to enter the beer industry and this desire to be in Germany also stems from that, and my thoughts on attending Weihenstephan. I have nothing else to dedicate my life to, and studying the German language in Germany seems like the best option to me. I know that was my biggest mistake when I was in Japan and studying the language there...not actually going out and diving into a situation which would force me to deal more with the language. Long story short, I have nobody holding me back this time and I want to go for it, even if only for a couple months.

 

I am asking all of these questions in order to make the best decisions, because I am not familiar with the situation I will be in. I have visited Germany twice now, for roughly three weeks each time. I love German culture and the people I have met, and Regensburg is a nice city made nicer by the people I know there. Even if I don't come away with a certification level appropriate to attending a college, I think the experience and the language ability I will learn will prove to be invaluable, or at the very least, memorable.

 

I could make myself believe and hope for lollipops and roses, but I am not trying to fool myself into believing perfection exists in this situation. I simply believe that my funds are adequate to support me for at least two months, which I can dedicate towards learning the culture more and working towards a certification level in the language. I truly only wish to know the best way of going about this. I believe that so far Horizonte looks like the best opportunity...

 

Now I just have to plan on a timeframe and further logistics. Any and all advice will still be appreciated, of course. And the offer of a beer for thanks still stands. Thank you all who have provided help so far and I truly thank you for helping me transition into this new life of mine.

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Beer, at this point what you're trying to do is, frankly, quixotix. If you had significant savings, I would say, sure, come on over and spend as long as you need to learning German in order to pursue your dream. But that isn't the case, hence I advised you to try another path.

 

Build up your savings and re-evaluate in a couple of years if studying at Weihenstephan makes sense for you. Alternatively, you could try to find a German woman to marry you, which would give you a visa that allows you to work for any employer and access to subsidized German courses.

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I'm really just trying to test the waters, as it were, as to whether or not I could see myself doing this sort of thing for a few years at Weihenstephan. I am fairly confident now that I could not afford it now, but I can afford spending a couple months there just to learn a bit more of the language and experience some of the basic life essentials I would need to learn to survive on my own. I have enough to support that idea now, from what I can budget out with what everyone has said and what info I have found.

 

I will plan to pay off my loan and accrue proper savings, hopefully within the span of three years, which I had originally planned for while in the military. This should also give me enough time to become good enough at the language for my studies. The marriage thing though...yeah... I'm going through a messy divorce right now and really cannot fathom getting myself into that situation again anytime soon! :P

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Well I think the most important question has yet to be asked to the OP. Are you from Oklahoma? If so ignore my advice.

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BeerFTW, it sounds like you are coming around to reality :) Given that you think you could afford a couple of months to study, I'll give som suggestions from my perspective.

 

First, I would study German as much as possible from where ever you currently are, using all of the possible online resources. I believe it would be the best use of your money to enroll in a private language school for a couple of months when you are at at least ready for A2. You can learn A1 and the basics of grammar on your own, but A2 is where those of us with less strength of grammar really start to need good explanations. The link above to test your language level is a very good suggestion.

 

Stay with your friends in Regensburg if possible, to save money, or stay in a shared apartment. Start investigating the language schools in the city. Some VHS (community college) are better than others, and have intensive courses (you are looking for a minimum of 26 hrs/wk), but they may not progress as quickly as private language school intensive courses may. If you are coming all of this way, you likely want to spend the money to really get a small class size and intense learning experience in a private language school. Do some research ahead of time to see how different schools are rated by present/former students.

 

My other suggestion would be to come in fall or winter - ask the school when they have the lowest number of students. For instance, I was enrolled in August and class sizes were between 5 and 13; now I think the largest class is 10, and most have around 5 students - pretty much perfect. This would also expose you to some of the harsher weather that Germany has to offer - and really let you evaluate whether you would want to experience it long-term, ie. living here.

 

As you say, you have big changes coming in your life, and you are still young - you have not so much to lose - this is a good time to be brave, but also realistic. Good luck!

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Well I think the most important question has yet to be asked to the OP. Are you from Oklahoma? If so ignore my advice.

 

I am not from Oklahoma...just Los Angeles, California. Why???

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First, I would study German as much as possible from where ever you currently are, using all of the possible online resources. I believe it would be the best use of your money to enroll in a private language school for a couple of months when you are at at least ready for A2. You can learn A1 and the basics of grammar on your own, but A2 is where those of us with less strength of grammar really start to need good explanations. The link above to test your language level is a very good suggestion.

 

As you say, you have big changes coming in your life, and you are still young - you have not so much to lose - this is a good time to be brave, but also realistic. Good luck!

 

Thanks alot Melyco. I was planning to do this all as soon as possible in December, but I'm seeing that it might be better for me to start in March or April next year. That would coincide with my current projected separation date from the military, though I am allowed to separate sooner in order to start my life outside a now dead-end job. It would also give me time to study more, research further, and, most importantly, attend a metal festival happening at the end of May. ;) I am making plans, but right now I'm writing in jello! Flexible is the name of the game, unfortunately...

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Whenever I hear a "yes, but", I fear for the plan. Beer, beginning to study now, no matter how little - even a few hours a week - is not time that will be wasted. You can learn a lot in six months.

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Well, the "yes, but," was actually a statement saying my plan was already failing! I am studying now, I was just referring to the formal studies I want to accomplish in Germany.

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