Quitting to study

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Hi all,

 

I have been searching through various topics but I couldn't find any significant info about this. If this is already covered, however, I apologise in advance and I would appreciate if you could point me to the topic in question.

 

I am a 34 years old Portuguese male and I came to Germany in August 2010 to start a new job in Frankfurt. After three years of working here, I am now going to start a masters degree in Cologne and, as it would be impossible to do both things at the same time, I will have to quit from my job at the end of this month.

 

My question(s) is(are): Am I still entitled to the unemployment fund for these three years that I worked? And in that case, will the Arbeitsamt take into consideration that, while studying, I can only have a part-time job in Cologne, not a full-time job (in case they send me job offers)? I heard that, when the employee quits, they cannot get any unemployment for three months - is the situation similar when you quit to study?

 

I plan to go there and ask all these questions myself but, since my German is still not that good for some topics (I mostly work in English and Portuguese) and most people at the Arbeitsamt don't speak English, I would appreciate if someone could give me some feedback before I go there so that I can better understand what they tell me.

 

Thank you very much for your time.

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Students are generally not eligible for unemployment insurance benefits (although under certain circumstances part-time students may receive ALGI). You'll have to fund your studies yourself.

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Seriously does the business case stack up for your study? A year out with no income, plus funding all your living expenses? How long will the ROI be? even if you got a job at the end. Couldnt you have got your employer to pay and do it remote over a greater time? You cannot get unemployment benefit as a student...

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Hi engelchen and rugbycoach,

 

Thank you very much for your prompt replies.

 

I will try to investigate the circumstances under which I could apply for ALGI as a part-time student.

 

As for the other considerations, I could write a long essay about how investments have, in their essence, a part of risk, or ask if the illusion of a "seemingly financially safer choice" is such a sure path to happiness, but I'd rather not do it here, and I can (almost safely) bet you're not interested in that either :)

 

I did think a lot before taking this step, though.

 

Again, thank you very much for your time and for replying so quickly.

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My husband did the similar thing, he took a year out to do his MBA but instead of downright quitting, he took unpaid leave, after which the employer was obliged to take him back. He however was not obliged to return to the employer. No ALGI, but provided him with some peace of mind (as it turned out, he didn't go back to the same company upon completion of his study). Have you considered this option too? That way you can safely burn your savings with the assurance that you will start earning it all back when your study finishes.

Another way is part time studying while keeping your job, plenty of my colleagues do this, from bachelor's to PhD. Again no ALGI but job (and thus income) security.

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be aware your employer need only consider requests for a period of unpaid leave. They are under no obligation to grant it.

 

CT

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I did exactly that. I was working full time before I went back to do my Masters. Although my previous job ended before I made that decision, I had two concrete offers for full time jobs. I rejected those offers to study.

 

My reasons to going back to study were not economical. There is no way I will be able to justify two years of no income, and the expenses for living and university. But I always wanted to do a masters and I decided that it is now or never. Sometimes, gazing at the dwindling back account, I wonder if it was a smart decision to go back to study. At the same time, I am happy I took this step and I am networking quite well, which will hopefully help me in the future. Only time will tell. On economic terms, I am probably never going to break-even.

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Don´t know if this applies to master studies, but just for your info. A friend of mine used to work as a student part time, his health insurance was cheap at that time. Now he is doing his Ph. D. and to be able to work on side, he needs a health insurance on the level of a self employed and he got to pay now more compared with a regular student.

 

If you plan to work on side, you should talk with other students that are doing this.

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Thank you all for your feedback.

 

I did have a long discussion, first with the Works Council and then with a manager at my company, about other possibilities apart from plainly quitting. An unpaid leave was not really an option, since the company would have to keep my position unfilled and they actually need to expand the team at the moment, so they had no interest in that. I know I am entitled to propose a part-time after working for at least six months in a company but, again, this situation was not ideal for them (our workflow is quite irregular but when we have peaks we really need to be full time on a project, from the beginning to the end) and probably not for me either, since they usually only have people working part-time after maternal leaves and the hour reduction is not great, meaning that in practical terms the time, money and energy I would have to spend on going back and forth from Cologne to Frankfurt almost every day would probably not serve my interests or the company's.

 

So my plan still is to both freelance (I am a professional translator) and find a part-time job as soon as I get to Cologne. The ALGI would be nice, in case it was possible, just while I don't have this regular income again, since the perspective of eating away my hard-earned savings too fast still makes me nervous. But, as angelbeast put it, I also feel that it's now or never.

 

I am aware that I can have a "student plan" with a lower price in my health insurance now, I just asked my insurance company about these plans and I am comparing them to other options.

 

I will talk to other students who might be in this situation as soon as I start classes. Meanwhile, if anyone else who is/knows somebody in a similar situation reads this post, I would love to hear what you have to say too.

 

Thank you, everybody :)

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There is, of course, another option, which is to keep the full-time job and do a part-time masters. I kept my engineering management job and did an MBA over three years as distance learning with the OU. You miss out on campus networking and that student feeling, but seeing as, like Angelbeast, my ROI is dodgy anyway and I did it because I wanted to financing the course and a year or two out of a job was not doable.

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As for the other considerations, I could write a long essay about how investments have, in their essence, a part of risk, or ask if the illusion of a "seemingly financially safer choice" is such a sure path to happiness, but I'd rather not do it here, and I can (almost safely) bet you're not interested in that either

 

 

 

So my plan still is to both freelance (I am a professional translator) and find a part-time job as soon as I get to Cologne. The ALGI would be nice, in case it was possible, just while I don't have this regular income again, since the perspective of eating away my hard-earned savings too fast still makes me nervous. But, as angelbeast put it, I also feel that it's now or never.

 

I think it is great if you can afford to go back to school just because you feel like furthering your education. However, you need to recognise that it is also a luxury that many can’t afford. Considering that it is possible to study in Germany without having to pay much in tuition fees (thereby making a university education in Germany highly subsidised by the taxpayers), I don’t see why you should think you should receive unemployment insurance benefits while you are studying (and not really looking for a job).

 

 

I am aware that I can have a "student plan" with a lower price in my health insurance now, I just asked my insurance company about these plans and I am comparing them to other options.

 

You are too old for the student rate with the public health insurance companies and many private policies also have an age limit for student discounts.

 

 

I will talk to other students who might be in this situation as soon as I start classes. Meanwhile, if anyone else who is/knows somebody in a similar situation reads this post, I would love to hear what you have to say too.

 

In what situation? Working while studying is actually rather common. The only difference between you and some of your classmates is that you'll not be able to take advantage of all student discounts (many have an age limit). On the other hand there are also many students over 30 in Germany.

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Hi engelchen,

 

Thank you for your judgements.

 

My question was based on the logic that I could be able to get back a part of all the contributions I made for the unemployment fund now that I could actually need them more, not really living at the taxpayer's expenses. But again, it was a question, because I didn't know exactly how it works. I thought that was clear when I made it, as well as the fact that I will be looking for a job (this would be a temporary situation), like I said.

 

I also know I am over the age limit for the student rate of health insurance, but I heard that some companies do offer special rates for students at my age.

 

I think I have a clear idea about these issues now, thank you all very much for your contributions!

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On 12/08/2013, 01:04:50, desdemona said:

My husband did the similar thing, he took a year out to do his MBA but instead of downright quitting, he took unpaid leave, after which the employer was obliged to take him back. He however was not obliged to return to the employer. No ALGI, but provided him with some peace of mind (as it turned out, he didn't go back to the same company upon completion of his study). Have you considered this option too? That way you can safely burn your savings with the assurance that you will start earning it all back when your study finishes.

Another way is part time studying while keeping your job, plenty of my colleagues do this, from bachelor's to PhD. Again no ALGI but job (and thus income) security.

Hi, Could you plse let me know weather your husband received unemployment benefits (from his own previously paid monthly  employment money) during the time. If that is true, how he received. I am sorry for asking personal story. The information will benefit my planing as well. Thanks

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On 8/15/2017, 1:02:00, Anton anonymous said:

Hi, Could you plse let me know weather your husband received unemployment benefits (from his own previously paid monthly  employment money) during the time. If that is true, how he received. I am sorry for asking personal story. The information will benefit my planing as well. Thanks

No, he wasn't unemployed but on sabbatical leave, so he's not entitled to ALG1.

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