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Knitting translation

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Could somebody please help me translate the following sentence:

 

dann ueber die aeusseren je 86 Kraus rechts ueber die mittlere Maschen in Rueckenteilmitte glatt links (Hinr links, Rueckr rechts) stricken

 

If I had to guess then it was that I needed to add a stitch to the center of the panel after every 86 stitches...

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Hi MVR, do you have the schematics for this pattern? Also, if you're on Ravelry, there's lots of translation help there. Sounds like you're increasing on the edges, but I have no idea what the overall shape you're creating or what.

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dann ueber die aeusseren je 86 Kraus rechts ueber die mittlere Maschen in Rueckenteilmitte glatt links (Hinr links, Rueckr rechts) stricken

 

Garter stitch (knit each row) on the 86 stitches on the outside,

 

post-4788-13742190398561.jpg

 

stockinette stitch (knit one row and purl one row) on the middle of the back

 

post-4788-1374219062525.gif

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That sentence doesn't say increase at all (unless you've missed that bit out) just to knit garter on the outer 86 stitches (on each side) and stockinette across the middle.

 

You don't tend to increase on a back if you're working from the bottom up. Just decrease to shape the shoulders when you get up to sleeve level.

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For me - kraus rechts = garter

glatt rechts = stockinette w/knit showing outwards

glatt links = stockinette w/purl showing outwards

 

Reading the line again with a proper night's sleep- I also don't see any note to increase or do any shaping.

And, sounds like the pattern wants the knitter to show purl on the outside (glatt links)

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I always get my knickers in a twist with glatt rechts and glatt links and have to look them up every time (pattern pictures do fortunately usually give the game away, but adriprints is right there.

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I've only ever knitted one scarf in my life...on a whim, my daughter and I bought some wool today for another rainy weekend of scarf knitting.  The shop didn't sell knitting needles nor could they advise on the quantity necessary for an average scarf length ca. 1.5 meters x 25-35cm I guess? 

 

Now looking on Amazon, I've no idea which needles to buy.  It's very thick wool and the pack suggests 15 mm needles.  Which type of needles are best...wooden long ones?...which length? Or, loop types...I've never seen these before. Also, I'm not sure how many wool packs I needed as I don't understand the diagram....each pack is 26 meters long.  I bought 3 packs...is this enough/too much?

 

IMG_7438.JPG.107d263586b2eb26fc6cdcbe12bIMG_7439.JPG.7f5eb7e0ed88db4ce3cd2216a93

 

Many thanks in anticipation for any advice.

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oh boy that's fat yarn :) 

 

I'd buy the recommended needle size.  A pair of straight needles will probably be cheapest and given it's pretty unusual to use such a large size, I'd go with cheap, but you should make sure the needles are at least 5 cm longer than the desired width of the scarf (10 would be better).  I'd suggest bamboo needles for beginners as they're kind of "sticky" which means your stitches won't be so likely to slide off.  

 

for whether you have enough yarn or not:  next to the needle size there is a gauge indicator.  I can't read it but it will tell you how many stitches you should get per row, per 10 cm of width, and how many rows you should get per 10 cm of length.  You can use this to decide how many stitches you need to cast on (for 30 cm width you'd need #stitches per 10 cm X 3).  

 

I can't guess if you'll have enough yarn to go for a meter long scarf but you could try to calculate it by knitting one row to the width you want (eg 30 cm) then mark the ends of the row, unravel it and measure how much yarn you used for that row. 

 

then:

 

         yarn per 10 cm (of length) = yarn per row * rows per 10 cm (on the chart)

 

         total scarf length = (total yarn / yarn per 10 cm) * 10 

 

I'd just start knitting in the width you want then see where it gets you :)

 

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Thank you  @lisa13...yes, very thick yarn for a complete novice.  The one and only scarf I've knitted before was a similar size...nice and quick for a beginner!  The diagram next to the needle width (does it mean 15mm?) ...

 

IMG_7447.JPG

I think it will either work out as a scarf if long enough or end up a cat blanket!  Any more tips welcome...:)

 

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I think it would have to be but can't be sure - probably depends on where the yarn is from.

 

for reference I have a project that's using 15 mm needles and I'm getting 7 stitches per 10 cm and they're not particularly tight so I can't imagine how you could get 3 stitches with the same needles.  Can you tell me what the yarn is?  then I can have a look as this seems weird - like you'd need HUGE needles to get 3 stitches

 

I have to offer an extra special thank you for asking,  as through your question I found the moths's lair - they're in that bulky project, which for some reason I didn't think to check as it's kinda packed away and I'd forgotten about it.  nice fluffy alpaca.  they love that stuff, and I'm guessing they came in on it. 

 

GAH!  it's a mess :(  But the mystery is solved.  THANK YOU!

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On 8/10/2019, 4:53:55, lisa13 said:

I found the moths's lair - they're in that bulky project,

 

I told Himself about your moth problem and he said "probably came in some yarn.".

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yes I suspect so as I don't buy second hand clothes.  That's the only yarn I bought from that particular store, too. From now on any new yarn is going to get baked or steamed then stashed in a zip lock so this doesn't happen again.

 

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