What IT jobs are most in demand?

72 posts in this topic

Gwap - there's hope for me. I would love to go back to work. I had all but given up thinking the Berlin "squat and coke" goatees and Indians at 10 Rupees an hour had killed me off.

 

I'm feeling hearted as the stuff I used to do was needed, definitely not cool and hip, yet it seems old farts may even be more in demand than I thought. What we offer is wisdom based on observation of endless latest trendy cockups in IT. Spose you might call it experience.

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and my employer for one has learnt that cheap Indians don't equate better and ready software. In fact, I spent a good year now refactoring out all the server-side shite they constructed (which didn't work), and my colleague's only just managed to stop the biggest gaps in the UI stuff they made.

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Gwap - gratifying to hear. My old firm used to send maps to India to be digitized and they'd come back with "strasse" as StraBe" instead of with Sharp S "?". My QC job became in effect akin to toilet cleaning - all that with 15 years experience and an MSc. Shite Shite shite.

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It seems the German IT market isn't as yet completely dominated by IT recruiters [*spit*] who have no idea about skills and applicability and who just want to tick boxes and put you in their database so they can show how many brilliant candidates they might have to prospective clients. So, if you are confident that you can code in anything from LambdaMOO through Io, or that at worst you'll take a month or so to become proficient, there are chances. Networking is, as always, going to be key, and my experience (getting a job via a Corp Mate in EVE Online) shows that it doesn't matter what sort of networking :)

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Replying to an old message, but perhaps it's still interesting for the topic :-)

 

 

Software testers are the guys that are usually not good enough for development, so that is usually a low pay dead end.

Nobody wants it because it is generally a career dead end.

 

Indeed, but don't confuse "software tester" with "quality engineer". As a former quality engineer myself, I have to say that I had a really hard time finding *good* people to work with me. At the same time, I had quite a few interesting proposals to work for other companies, so, for those who like to write code that tests code (or, in other words, to write code that breaks code), it's a very nice field with good opportunities. Also, it's not uncommon to have software engineers switching to quality engineering and vice-versa, as the required skills are very similar.

 

About the salary, I'd say that it is pretty much comparable with software engineers, perhaps with a slight advantage for quality engineering roles, as there's a huge lack of professionals.

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My field is GIS and so I went on the InterGeo annual conference website and down the list of exhibitors subdiv München. Emailed about 30 of them like a mailshot, 4 or 5 responded and one gave me a job! It worked like that.

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To get back to the question in Post #45. As an IT freelancer, I deal with various head-hunters when a contract is coming to an end or I am between projects (polite term for unemployed). They usually approach me, but I have built up a collection of 80 head-hunters who have contacted me over the years, and I can send them all an email in one go. Here, you need a good covering letter and a CV or profile (as it is called for freelancers) to attach to your email. When you get awarded a project, it is important to let any other head-hunters, who were also setting up interviews for you, know the situation. Otherwise you will get very unpleasant phone calls from them, saying that you have wasted their time, etc. etc. They could also cross you off their list for next time, which sooner or later will come along.

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Personally I've found all head hunters and recruiters a complete waste of time in Germany. Not once have they managed to even get me an interview anywhere, despite my 9 years' experience in IT security, degrees, various certifications, and a collection of well-known international companies under my belt.

 

I no longer answer emails or phone calls from them, although I guess it's a different story if you're a freelancer. They're just a huge waste of time to me.

 

As for cheap Indians, don't even get me started on outsourcing...

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One of my clients refers to the Indian outsourcing model as "mess for less". I believe they use that term in their sales pitches, too.

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Let's revive this thread as I'm curious what the current situation is, at least as far as Munich area is concerned.

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Hi,

A friend with a  background in Applied Maths. for MS  and a PhD in Economics with Finance. He has currently move to Frankfurt and looking for jobs in Frankfurt. 

Thinking of the financial institutions but have no strong link/network there. Another possibility is data science and have knowledge of the following software: R, Python, and basic knowledge of SQL coupled with expertise in Data mining and ML. Any suggestions how to start the job search process? Many thanks.

 

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