What IT jobs are most in demand?

72 posts in this topic

 

I'm german, but without a degree in IT, so you're in a better position than me already ;-)

 

Fair enough. Thanks for your help on this thread. Hopefully my computing related degree will bode well for me.

 

Im willing to take any route so if that means bar job and biding my time to get my break in the sector then thats what I will do.

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As an extension from the original post, I'm just wondering what IT skills are useful for the finance branch? SQL seems to spring to mind, but perhaps IT engineers already in the finance industry could disclose better.

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i would say SAP. and any reports-type stuff like Business Objects/Crystal Reports/Cognos/Cliqview etc...basically any Datamart/DB ETL stuff.

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Hi Friends,

I need a small information regarding job search in Germany.

I am currently working in Dusseldorf and looking for a new job in Germany.

Is it possible that i accept multiple offers and later decide and join one of them which best suits me.

 

Looking forward to your valuable inputs.

Thank You In Advance!!!

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You cannot accept multiple offers and later decide which one to join. If you formally accept, you have an obligation to join, you can of course jump ship in the 6 months probation period (serving the short notice period)

 

You can receive many offers and formally accept only one. Which is actually fair to the company as well, as they would have rejected the other applicants and have to start the process from the beginning.

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I've said it before and I'll probably say it again (mainly because it's about all I know): Legacy is the future of computing.

 

A hell of a lot of my early career involved uploading half inch tapes into old computer centre central mainframe tape readers, then deciphering what the hell was on the header of the old Landsat image, to migrate it into a new software system, ditto moving geodetic datums into GPS friendly ones. Huge organisations such as for example the US ARmy of Deutsche Bahn move their corporate computer systems at glacier pace so they still use quite old gear, not the latest and greatest.

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it may not be terribly exciting and cutting-edge to fix bugs in a system written in RPG or COBOL, but it sure is lucrative.

 

Amen.

 

- A proud Mainframe Legacy Mordenization Specialist!

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Hi d a,

 

 

Is it possible that i accept multiple offers and later decide and join one of them which best suits me.

Honestly, Is that a real question?

 

That's like booking a table for the evening in 10 different restaurants. Might be cool for you because you have the freedom of a last minute choice...

 

But it...

 

a.) P*sses off 9 out of 10 restaurant owners (Which on a more or less long run might backfire into your face, as you won't be welcome as a customer in 9 out of 10 places in the future)

b.) Is a kick in the a*se of other folks looking for a table, because they'll get rejected with a "sorry we're fully booked" everywhere due to your behaviour of grabbing more than you actually need.

 

Again, you are not really asking that question (on a forum where other - potentially job seeking - IT specialists hang around)?

 

Cheers

Franklan

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ICL 1906 with George III back at North Staffs Poly...

PDP 8 with a real boot loader that needed to be hand loaded (switches on the panel)

 

Yes, Legacy is the future -- very true, Gwaptiva.

 

@OP:

My recommendation is to do what you enjoy. I tried programming in Java and found it just too tedious.

C++ was (back then) too "wordy" for me.

When I came to Germany I did some SAP ABAP. Seriously boring - but pays the bills.

 

But in a small company, you need to understand the customer requirements and these

are likely as not in German. Talking to the customer is then the next stage - as the spec

is probably not defined enough...

 

German is very important unless you get into a multinational.

That way English can be used - and also the spec will be clearly defined.

 

Mordenization

I like that - somewhere between murdering and updating.

Sums up so many projects :D

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PDP 8 with a real boot loader that needed to be hand loaded (switches on the panel)

 

Been there - did that. A PDP-8 was the first ever compter I got my hands on whilst in final year at school - my father had one of the first PDP-8s in Europe to drive an X-Ray defractometer & I cut my teeth on that system. Then came the suggestion that perhaps Computer Science was the thing to study - I applied to Manchester and got accepted. First lectures were by Tom Kilburn on diodes (this was 1970).

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ICL 1906 with George III back at North Staffs Poly...

 

Hang on a moment - would that be College Road or Leek Road? or was Leek road not even built at that time?

 

I was in the Brindley Building in Leek Rd, lived in Ashford Street Shelton! By 'eck those Wright's Pies were great!

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Eeh, eck, this were Blackheath Lane in Stafford, like.

Opposite the crematorium.

 

There were an Canoe un' Diving Club an' all...

 

...Eyes glazing over...

 

Closed down now... moved off into some posh building away from the crem.

 

Class of 78-82

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Dropping punched cards is only a laugh if it happens to someone else...

 

Worse is when the high-speed card reader (the ones attached to ICL 1900s were impressive) return your deck of cards now folded like a set of Japanese fans.

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I started with writing COBOL programs in 1990 with Micro Focus COBOL on an MS-DOS PC (version 3 as I recall) and using 5 1/4 inch floppy disks to back up my work. When a back-up went wrong, there were many tears. One or two fellow students had mishaps in which they lost their project work through a faulty floppy disk.

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Working in Cobol in 1990 is pretty much normal though.

My first job after college in 2001 was with Cobol in Banking software.

I was amazed about the demand in Cobol programming and the extended use of Cobol in banking.

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This is a useful thread for those of us oldies who thought we'd been kicked out in favour of a 20 something with a goatee.

 

So how easy is it to seek out legacy work? Do websites exist for IT peeps in the vein of an old rock band reforming?

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I was offered a job as COBOL programmer for a Dutch bank in 1996. I didn't accept this as I started to work for an ERP software company (SMEs). That was a good decision as the bank offshored these jobs to India a few years later.

 

The ERP software was installed with 3.5" floppy disks. Sometimes you needed like 50 disks to install it and when no. 39 was faulty, we replaced that disk and the customer started all over again with the installation procedure, also typing a shit load of license key numbers. Some customers made backups using the same floppy disk set again and again until one got faulty and you couldn't restore the backup anymore when needed or they only made a backup on the harddisk of the PC until it crashed. They usually had to redo the whole accounting for that fiscal year.

 

Sometimes we had a customer on the phone stating he couldn't install the floppy disk until I mentioned "Turn it upside-down and try again" :).

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I wish... but in the midst of IT chaos money can be earned!

 

Edit: Started in 1977 on ICL with George III and RPG. Dropping punched cards is only a laugh if it happens to someone else...

 

the first thing i learned was to draw with a thick magic marker, a diagonal line in my box of punched cards from corner to corner. ;)

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This is a useful thread for those of us oldies who thought we'd been kicked out in favour of a 20 something with a goatee.

 

So how easy is it to seek out legacy work? Do websites exist for IT peeps in the vein of an old rock band reforming?

 

Not sure if there are dedicated sites, but you get quite a bunch of hits if you google 'grossrechner jobs'. And 20-somethings with a goatee want to move to Berlin to work for a literal peanut in some startup, hoping that it'll be the next Instagram, and so they're likely to go for stuff like Ruby/Rails. Yes, some jobs will have moved to India/China, but having read some of the horror stories about their skills with main frames (was it RBOS?), I think that there too it's just not sexy enough.

 

The problems I've read about in the press (and at big blue internally already a decade ago) are that the guys that really know what sprockets to oil on mainframes are all retiring (due to age or due to the fact that final salary pension schemes that these guys started out on are being discontinued), and that there's no next generation beardy. (article in German)

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