What IT jobs are most in demand?

72 posts in this topic

No, think you got the wrong end of the stick. It was a wee joke playing on the common stereotype of programmers being single spotty desperate guys...

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:rolleyes:

 

yeah...I'm one of those programmers who takes things wayyyyyy too literally sometimes

 

thanks Gwaptiva

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It might be worthwhile to look at medium and long term trends.

 

I would guess that there will be fewer infrastructure jobs due to advances in tech, but in addition, many infrastructure jobs will be offshored.

 

A career as a System Administrator or DBA has maybe 5-10 years of longevity - IMO.

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I would guess that there will be fewer infrastructure jobs due to advances in tech, but in addition, many infrastructure jobs will be offshored.

 

Tbh, I don't quite see that trend. Most employers I've met were very unhappy to have their IT team spread over different countries and tried to bring them back together in one place.

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booz hamilton should have a sys admin opening in Hawaii. How well can she keep a secret?

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May I ask why?

 

A couple reasons:

 

1. Network engineers these days are a dime a dozen - market is very saturated, making finding a job as an entry level engineer very difficult as these positions are either promoted from within (helpdesk > floor technician > jr. network engineer/admin), or the engineers are hired with years and years of experience under their belts already

 

2. Software based networking, although very new will take over hardware based networking in the coming years. All the knowledge learned from the previous form of networking will not be thrown in the trash but the industry is set to change in a big way.

 

3. Waaaay more jobs for software developers than network engineers.

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A couple reasons:

 

1. Network engineers these days are a dime a dozen - market is very saturated, making finding a job as an entry level engineer very difficult as these positions are either promoted from within (helpdesk > floor technician > jr. network engineer/admin), or the engineers are hired with years and years of experience under their belts already

 

2. Software based networking, although very new will take over hardware based networking in the coming years. All the knowledge learned from the previous form of networking will not be thrown in the trash but the industry is set to change in a big way.

 

3. Waaaay more jobs for software developers than network engineers.

 

1 - So true

2 - Yes definately, if you are going to learn about networking then SDN, Openflow, Dove and NFV are the things to learn.

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1 - So true

2 - Yes definately, if you are going to learn about networking then SDN, Openflow, Dove and NFV are the things to learn.

 

Yes indeed, im not too familiar with NFV but I swear new terms within/around SDN are popping up by the dozen every day, cant keep up!

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Thanks for creating this thread.

 

Im moving to Germany next year once I've completed my degree in Internet Computing & Systems Administration and was also interested in what types of job were available.

 

I did straight Computer Science first year but then switched to a specialist course as I wanted to do something more involved with the 'online' aspect rather than the theory.

 

I'm strong in PHP, JavaScript, HTML5, CSS3 and can easily get on with WordPress to alter themes and so on. I have some experience in Java although I will be expanding on that this year whilst also working on my dissertation. I did a bit of LUA whilst modding games as well as it was interesting seeing what you could get the games to do by adding code yourself.

 

Im hoping these skills as well as other things I've learnt in university will help me find a job quite quickly in Germany.

 

:)

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Thanks for creating this thread.

 

Im moving to Germany next year once I've completed my degree in Internet Computing & Systems Administration and was also interested in what types of job were available.

 

I did straight Computer Science first year but then switched to a specialist course as I wanted to do something more involved with the 'online' aspect rather than the theory.

 

I'm strong in PHP, JavaScript, HTML5, CSS3 and can easily get on with WordPress to alter themes and so on. I have some experience in Java although I will be expanding on that this year whilst also working on my dissertation. I did a bit of LUA whilst modding games as well as it was interesting seeing what you could get the games to do by adding code yourself.

 

Im hoping these skills as well as other things I've learnt in university will help me find a job quite quickly in Germany.

 

smile.gif

 

<Reality>

OK I am going sound a bit mean but but its not intended that way, just to help you (benefit of sometimes painful experience).

 

All uni provides is an entry ticket, competence really comes from learning on the job. The only thing you've mentioned of value is Java and that is a widely available skill today.

 

Regardless of the details you are better off just saying computer science on your CV it might sound boring but the people hiring you will understand what it is and feel confident that you know what you are doing, trust me its better than having to lecture people on the differences.

 

You might find a german company that will take you on but its unlikely realistically you should be looking at M4 from Cardiff to London before anything else.

 

Try to get at least 1-2yrs experience in a SW company anywhere that will have you...

 

Network, make friends, be helpful, be someone people feel good about working with, this will help you more through the years than anything else.

</Reality>

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Joe, I don't think that sounded mean at all. In fact it's exactly that type of post that helps people.

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<Reality>OK I am going sound a bit mean but but its not intended that way, just to help you (benefit of sometimes painful experience). All uni provides is an entry ticket, competence really comes from learning on the job. The only thing you've mentioned of value is Java and that is a widely available skill today. Regardless of the details you are better off just saying computer science on your CV it might sound boring but the people hiring you will understand what it is and feel confident that you know what you are doing, trust me its better than having to lecture people on the differences. You might find a german company that will take you on but its unlikely realistically you should be looking at M4 from Cardiff to London before anything else. Try to get at least 1-2yrs experience in a SW company anywhere that will have you... Network, make friends, be helpful, be someone people feel good about working with, this will help you more through the years than anything else. </Reality>

 

I understand what you are saying but I got to the final 2 of an interview for a large German company and I was only not selected because the other person knew German so that is something I am addressing now as I asked them for tips at the end of the interview.

 

I have been offered jobs already by people searching online and so on in Germany and other countries but im deciding to stick out my course so I have a qualification instead of jumping at something. I hopefully should be able to get a job out there applying for a company and then going for an interview.

 

Of course it will be hard work but if I apply for a job in London I have to move to London and make a change. The difference in Germany is the language and if I can get that sorted I dont see the difference with the change as I'd be going for a job in London or Berlin or Paris or Madrid with no experience.

 

If the company is willing to take me on then that is all that matters and then I will prove my worth and the faith they have showed in me whilst working there.

 

I really wish I had finished my degree as I could have had a job by now.

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The only thing you've mentioned of value is Java

 

As a PHP developer, I beg to differ. While not as profitable as being a Java developer, you can still make a decent living on that.

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As a PHP developer, I beg to differ. While not as profitable as being a Java developer, you can still make a decent living on that.

 

That's why I'm learning Java this year to make me more appealing in the job market. Again, thanks for your help Illic.

 

May I ask, are you German or somebody who decided to move over there? :)

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May I ask, are you German or somebody who decided to move over there?

 

I'm german, but without a degree in IT, so you're in a better position than me already ;-)

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i do this...and i get headhunted a few times a week.

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solutions_Architect

 

keeps me on my toes and is always interesting.

 

great pay, bonuses and stock-based "retention plans".

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Or you can do what I did: From call centre agent to paper pusher to project manager to systems analyst to code monkey... only takes about 15 years :)

 

I've said it before and I'll probably say it again (mainly because it's about all I know): Legacy is the future of computing.

 

Yes, previous poster(s) may have a point that in IT technologies and paradigms shift with scary regularity, but there will be a very (if not more than) decent bit of money to be made from stuff that was once in vogue and now nobody knows any more: it may not be terribly exciting and cutting-edge to fix bugs in a system written in RPG or COBOL, but it sure is lucrative.

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