Twelve misused English words in German

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Thats is because "remind" and "remember" are translated "erinnern". There is just one word in german.

 

Although there are two words for "borrow" and "lend" ("borgen" und "leihen") it is still difficult to

find out, which is the right one because "borgen" and "leihen" mean the same and you can replace one

by the other without changing the meaning.

 

The same way it sometimes sounds unusual when english speaking people try to use the word "doch" which

does not exist in english.

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.The same way it sometimes sounds unusual when english speaking people try to use the word "doch" whichdoes not exist in english.

 

Aye

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I believe there is an English word to translate the meaning of doch - "Indeed"

 

You don't want milk in your tea, do you?

Indeed, I do. This negates the negative question.

 

What is more interesting is how common it is in the German culture to ask a question in a negative formulation. I would consider this a weak form of speaking, being too tentative. Similar to adding, "you know" or " don't you think" at the end of a sentence.

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I believe there is an English word to translate the meaning of doch - "Indeed"

 

You don't want milk in your tea, do you?

Indeed, I do. This negates the negative question.

 

I'm only a B1 in German, but I think that "doch" has other meanings that don't correspond precisely to "indeed." Am I wrong?

 

I've noticed that I've started asking people questions with the "oder?" ending... but in English. As in: "Did you want to meet up at the cafe, or?" Ugh. Must. break. habit.

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I don't understand in what sense these words are being misused? Is it Germans speaking English and then saying 'handy' instead of cell or mobile? Then I would agree. But Germans speaking German and using the word 'handy' is not a misuse of English words because Handy and Smoking are German words (with English origin).

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Some words a couple of my German colleagues and a few of my German students frequently use when speaking (and writing) in English:

 

English: You are going to the party, right?

German English: You are going to the party, or? (I concur with Amanda UCSC on this)

 

English: I got up at 5am this morning.

German English: I stood up at 5am this morning.

 

German English: (presumably for Gruesse as a closing for emails and letters)

Greets,

Helga

 

English: impractical, immoral, disloyal, illegal

German English: unpractical, unmoral, unloyal, unlegal

Nevertheless, I could still understand them and my students have been committing lesser errors after frequent corrections. There are a few more words but I have to get to work! :)

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The worst one for me is the misuse of "until", as in, "Could you get this ready until Friday, please?"

 

It always makes me want to ask "Do you really want me to keep repeating this task for the whole week?"

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I believe there is an English word to translate the meaning of doch - "Indeed"

 

You don't want milk in your tea, do you?

Indeed, I do. This negates the negative question.

 

There is no single translation of doch, it depends on the context in which it is used. But even in the context you provided, "indeed" does not fit. "On the contrary" is the closest English translation for doch in this context.

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I believe there is an English word to translate the meaning of doch - "Indeed"

 

"Doch" is a complicated word, it has a bunch of meanings in English. Some of them:

 

- Anyway

- After all

- But

- Though

- However

- Except

- Yet

 

And I am sure I am missing some. And sometimes it is just an expression to give emphasis.

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Maybe it is just me, but I kind of like the word "handy" instead of cell phone or mobile phone. Those are so technical sounding. My handy is indeed very handy, so I don't mind that term. But I do loathe the new trend of "smart phone". I realize my "smart phone" has a few more functions these days, but it sounds so pretentious to call it that. Handy is enough for me.

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I can think of plenty of Denglish that sounds odd in normal English ("shitstorm" would be on the list of most inappropriate in formal settings)

 

Inappropriate, exactly - it just bothers us natives because it seems out of place to us - it is our problem, no-one else's. The other day I went past a car that had 'miscarriage' painted on the side in big letters, as if it was the name of a band or something. I wonder if the owner even knows what it means.

 

 

getting weird looks for *not* using Denglish myself

 

I got funny looks when I said 'O2' (the phone people) in German, rather than saying it in English with a German accent :-) If you say Denglisch with an English accent, on the other hand, people don't understand you - or even correct you. A few things I have had 'corrected' are 'Chicken Surprise' at McD's (SoorPREEZA!) or 'Black matrix' at MediaMarkt (Bleck Martrix). At first I used to just goggle at people in perplexity when they did this, now I might say something like 'Ach, so sagt man das auf Deutsch', as that is after all what they are telling me - those words have been purloined, they are no longer ours. And as the biggest word-nickers of them all we can't even complain.

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Respectively is used incorrectly 100% by all my German colleagues.

 

And even better when they abbreviate it and just use "resp.", oder?

 

I asked a few Germans yesterday about shitstorm and flamewar, as well as one American. None of them had ever heard of either word. Apparently the people I know in real life don't spend a lot of time on the internet. :rolleyes: :)

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Might I also add, in consideration of the footie scores this week, insufferable?

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How would you translate: "Dann übersetz doch mal diesen Satz" ?

 

Then translate this sentence anyway.

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How would you translate: "Dann übersetz doch mal diesen Satz" ?

 

I'd probably go with a Hiberno-English "so" but I can get away with that 'cos I'm Irish :)

 

"Well, translate this sentence so."

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