Volunteering in Heidelberg

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Thanks to those that contributed to the "New to Heidelberg" post.

 

In addition to language school and employment, I would like to spend some time volunteering in the area.

Here is what I found so far:

AEGEE - Erasmus student org

Red Cross USAG-BW - American Red Cross on the base

workaway.info -Sign up for a personal volunteer request

hilfe-hd.de -Certainly the best resource. A bit tough to navigate

 

Does anybody have personal experience with these organizations?

If I can be picky, I would prefer to do something related to medicine or outdoors or manual labor.

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No experience with those organizations, so can't help there, unfortunately. Do you speak German (well enough to volunteer in German with people, i.e. as a volunteer hospital visitor, speaking with patients, or whatever)? The hospitals may have opportunities for English-speaking volunteers, for example, to sort and/or push the book cart with foreign-language books around the wards (normally the work of the "Green Ladies" here.)

My go-to website for volunteer opportunities in the area is http://www.freiwilligenboerse-heidelberg.de/. Perhaps you don't need it with the other options you've listed, but it may be useful for others. They're extremely well organized and have not only a website but actual people and an office you can visit if you have questions, etc. They help organize not only individual volunteer opportunities but also corporate volunteering and projects for groups seeking to contribute to the local community in a variety of ways. Good stuff.

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"Green Ladies"

 

The Lila Damen take men too btw. Two or three guys with them at the moment. In the same smocks.

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Do you like working with children or for the children? Well, we do have our sick kids and staff once in a while :), kids are usually outdoors an hour or so a day if the weather is good, the Altstadt branch will work some more on the school garden too, etc. Maybe the Deutsch-Amerikanisches Institut (German-American Institute) in Heidelberg might be a good place to look into for volunteer work. You may contact :

 

Ingrid Stolz

Director

ingrid.stolz@dai-heidelberg.de

06221 - 607320

 

For more information, here is their website address:

 

http://www.dai-heidelberg.de/content/e2254/index_eng.html

 

Cheers! :)

 

Angela

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Hi all,

 

I am possibly moving to Heidelberg and looking some opportunities to spend my spare time.

Unfortunately I don't speak German.

My background is in medicine, anesthesiology, but I am open to any kind of work, including volunteer.

This would give me the opportunity to meet people, learn the language and help others. 

Why am I considering this... For a Lady I love and to be with her and her children.

 

Any input or suggestions wold be greatly appreciated!

Best regards,

Gary

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@jeba

Summoning jeba, a German erstwhile aneasthesiologist, for you.

He did promise to help out if something in his specialty ever cropped up in the forum, so his chance came sooner than expected ;)

 

On 3/25/2019, 9:41:08, jeba said:

I don´t claim to be an expert (unless I deem myself knowledgeable enough - but there haven´t been many questions about transmembraneous catecholamine transport mechanisms :lol:

 

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8 hours ago, PandaMunich said:

@jeba

Summoning jeba, a German erstwhile aneasthesiologist, for you.

He did promise to help out if something in his specialty ever cropped up in the forum, so his chance came sooner than expected ;)

Not sure where the idea that I was an anesthesiologist is coming from. It´s too much of an honor. I only did the clinical part of my training in anesthesiology but never worked for long enough in that field to even be admitted to the specialist exam - not to mention having passed it.

 

If you´re an anesthesiologist wanting to spend your spare time in a meaningful way you might e. g. volunteer to accompany an emergency doctor as their assisstant. At least in my day (30 years ago) that was possible without much formalities. It might be interesting for you to get an insight into the German "Rettungswesen" (medical emergency services) and you could get a chance to put your skills to good use (in contrast to the US in Germany there will not only paramedics be dispatched but specially trained doctors as well). The local "Rettungsleitstelle" (dispatching center) will be able to tell you who you need to speak to. If interested make sure you have liability insurance cover though (maybe it will be provided by the emergency service operator).

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6 hours ago, jeba said:

If you´re an anesthesiologist wanting to spend your spare time in a meaningful way you might e. g. volunteer to accompany an emergency doctor as their assisstant. At least in my day (30 years ago) that was possible without much formalities. It might be interesting for you to get an insight into the German "Rettungswesen" (medical emergency services) and you could get a chance to put your skills to good use (in contrast to the US in Germany there will not only paramedics be dispatched but specially trained doctors as well). The local "Rettungsleitstelle" (dispatching center) will be able to tell you who you need to speak to. If interested make sure you have liability insurance cover though (maybe it will be provided by the emergency service operator).

 

 

I hate to bust your bubble jeba, but once again you are merely guessing and conjecturing - and presenting it as facts!

 

I'm also from the medical business, but am in better contact with German medical reality:

 

- A doctor with no knowledge of German will not find any kind of work - even volunteer work on an ambulance.

 

- A doctor with non-EU credentials does not hold a license to practice in Germany, aka the Approbation. He first must apply for said Approbation before doing anything! Nobody even may hire him.

The good news is however, that Germany has somewhat relaxed the laws that for a very long time strictly barred non-EU doctors from practicing in Germany. Please contact the German Aerztekammer to find out how your foreign credentials and university transcripts can be recognized and how to get the Approbation. It still will be a process.

 

- You still need to take an intensive German course before applying at German clinics as an unpaid Gastarzt (guest doctor).

 

No hopping on an ambulance for @NAP, I'm afraid. ;)

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15 hours ago, NAP said:

I am possibly moving to Heidelberg and looking some opportunities to spend my spare time.

Unfortunately I don't speak German.

My background is in medicine, anesthesiology, but I am open to any kind of work, including volunteer.

This would give me the opportunity to meet people, learn the language and help others.

 

I am not in the medical business but am in contact with reality,

 

There is a Bahnhofsmission at Heidelberg train station. People volunteer to provide general help to those in need getting on and off trains and to those who tend to congregate around public transport hubs. 

 

Refugee support is also an area where many people currently volunteer.

 

There is also the German Red Cross who provide support to many public events. 

 

 

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5 hours ago, Metall said:

I hate to bust your bubble jeba, but once again you are merely guessing and conjecturing - and presenting it as facts!

 

I'm also from the medical business, but am in better contact with German medical reality:

 

- A doctor with no knowledge of German will not find any kind of work - even volunteer work on an ambulance.

 

- A doctor with non-EU credentials does not hold a license to practice in Germany, aka the Approbation. He first must apply for said Approbation before doing anything! Nobody even may hire him.

The good news is however, that Germany has somewhat relaxed the laws that for a very long time strictly barred non-EU doctors from practicing in Germany. Please contact the German Aerztekammer to find out how your foreign credentials and university transcripts can be recognized and how to get the Approbation. It still will be a process.

 

- You still need to take an intensive German course before applying at German clinics as an unpaid Gastarzt (guest doctor).

 

No hopping on an ambulance for @NAP, I'm afraid. ;)

I never said he can work as a doctor. But if the Notarzt (emergency doctor) says he can accompany him he can - just as e. g. medical students or paramedics-in-training can. Of course, the responsibility would still lie with the Notarzt in charge. So with his consent "hopping on the ambulance" is possible.  And sometimes at an accident scene it can be useful to have someone around who knows what to do. And if there are more injured persons than the Notarzt/regular staff can treat simultaneously the law doesn´t require special qualifications from whoever is providing first aid. At least it used to be like that in my day (I used to be a Notarzt so I have an idea of what I´m talking about).

 

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29 minutes ago, jeba said:

I never said he can work as a doctor.

 

Why would you. He never said he wanted to. :)

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Need to be an accredited medical/ nursing  student, or visiting medical colleague to follow MD around or join Paramedic crew. Jeba- times have changed in the 30 years! 

Patient privacy, dignity, confidentiality .

Assessing correct background and qualifications .

Even volunteers need to go through checks.

 

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9 hours ago, RedMidge said:

Need to be an accredited medical/ nursing  student, or visiting medical colleague to follow MD around or join Paramedic crew. Jeba- times have changed in the 30 years! 

Maybe, but my guess is that a "Hospitation" (job shadowing) will still be possible. 30 years ago nobody checked anything. Once I was taken on a ride on the emergency car as Notarzt just because I accidentally was around when an emergency call was received at the "Rettungswache" (rescue station according to the dictionary - but it sounds strange, doesn´t it). I didn´t know the paramedics nor did they know me. I was there merely to see a friend (in order to arrange for playing cards - there were no cell phones in those days) who I thought was on duty but who wasn´t there and that I was wearing my white hospital clothing was enough reason for them to ask me to step in for him because there was no other doctor around and off we went. Nobody asked whether I really was a physician or whether I was certified as an emergency physician (at the time I wasn´t).

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On 10.3.2013, 01:08:52, mo!nmo!n said:

Does anybody have personal experience with these organizations?

If I can be picky, I would prefer to do something related to medicine or outdoors or manual labor.

 

 

I don't know any of the above organisations, but I am a voluntary firefighter, which almost fits all of your preferences - we are often outdoors, often have to rely upon physical fitness and strength, and also provide advanced first aid as and when necessary, until the "Vultures" (Rettungsdienst), as they are commonly known, come and pick up the pieces.

 

Not sure if this might be of interest to you, but I find it very rewarding.

 

https://www.heidelberg.de/Feuerwehr,Lde/feuerwehr/Freiwillige+Feuerwehr.html

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1 hour ago, robinson100 said:

I am a voluntary firefighter

 

Do you have any volunteers who don't speak German? Would you be able to train volunteers who couldn't speak German? Would you be willing to train someone who is just visiting? 

 

Are there any formal insurance related requirements/ forms / paperwork that need to be completed before someone tags along to an emergency? 

 

On 29/03/2019, 22:29:41, NAP said:

I am possibly moving to Heidelberg and looking some opportunities to spend my spare time.

Unfortunately I don't speak German.

 

Are you coming just to visit or are you planning on staying longer than 3 months?

 

On 29/03/2019, 22:29:41, NAP said:

Why am I considering this... For a Lady I love and to be with her and her children.

 

Are you planning on getting married? Or do you a position for which you could get a permit?

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59 minutes ago, engelchen said:

 

 

Do you have any volunteers who don't speak German? Would you be able to train volunteers who couldn't speak German? Would you be willing to train someone who is just visiting? 

 

 

 

We have a couple of asylum-seekers, who are learning German, but generally, anybody who is interested and wants to learn, will be welcomed and trained within the unit, and sent on further training courses as and when appropriate.

 

Insurance-wise, we are all covered by the Gemeinde Unfall Versicherung, and there really is a LOT of on-the-job training involved.

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