Getting a trailer for my car

11 posts in this topic

So, got my new car and had a trailer hitch installed. New it's not clean cut concerning the possible size of the trailer.

 

A total weight of 750kg is always allowed it seems ( non self braking) although it states 730kg in my fahrzeugschein. :blink:

 

If I look at the larger league my fahrzeugschein states I can pull 1400kg (self braking) in position 0.1 but (and that's the part I find confusing) below in

the special section (22) it says I can pull 1700kg upto 8% so that would mean upto 12% I could pull 1400kg?

 

I have found this

 

Am I correct in this assumption?

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You're right. If you stay in the plains you can pull up to 1700 Kg, although I probably wouldn't with an A3, well at least not without some kind of stabiliser (ALKO or Winterhoff) on the trailer.

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Assuming you purchased your new car at a dealer, why don´t you ask them? If anybody is accustomed to making sense of a Fahrzeugschein, it´ll be them!

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That sounds like a good idea, R100, and it should be that easy, but as a mechanic, parts tech and former car dealer I'd have to say that not all dealer staff are familiar on a day to day basis with the finer aspects of trailer towing. They can, of course, refer to corporate manuals for answers, but IME there may be several mini-conferences held between Helmut, Klaus, Heinrich and Hans-Dieter before their collective opinion will be uttered confirming that they think they might know about as much, or as little, as MLD does now.

 

If I had any doubt or question about technicalities like this I would just take the car's Fahrzeugschein along with the ABE, or makers technical docs, from the trailer hitch into the nearest TÜV or DEKRA and ask one of their testing engineers to confirm my assumptions. They are well qualified to give accurate advice on these kind of questions as they are engaged full-time in the inspection and approval of motor vehicles and trailers. Theirs are the organisations actually creating much of the input for the manufacturers CoC docs and the KFZ-Zulassungstelle data bases which print out the Fahrzeugscheine.

 

2B

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Good point concerning the dealer but the salesperson didn't even know how to instal the hitch <_<

 

Anyway after researching some I have figured out I won't need a damper because due to the hitch being factory installed the ESP has been adapted. :o

 

Just not sure yet what or if there is a maximum weight concerning the 100km

 

I will ask a trailer dealer in the next few days since they do deal with this stuff on a daily basis.

 

Damn it sure seems complicated...

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So, got my new car and had a trailer hitch installed. New it's not clean cut concerning the possible size of the trailer.

 

A total weight of 750kg is always allowed it seems ( non self braking) although it states 730kg in my fahrzeugschein.

 

If I look at the larger league my fahrzeugschein states I can pull 1400kg (self braking) in position 0.1 but (and that's the part I find confusing) below in

the special section (22) it says I can pull 1700kg upto 8% so that would mean upto 12% I could pull 1400kg?

 

I have found this

 

Am I correct in this assumption?

 

Mostly you were correct, but some of your interpretations are not 100% accurate.

Firstly 750kg is not always allowed. If your Fahrzeugschein states 730kg then that is the maximum weight (unbraked) trailer your vehicle may legally tow. More details on this later.*

Secondly, the position showing the Technically authorised maximum (braked) trailer weight in kg is not O.1, but Q1 so, methinks you may need a Lupe or reading goggles, m'lud.

Thirdly, the Audi PDF you linked to was dated March 2004. If your car is a 2012 model, it is of little value to compare those technical details.

 

*Reappraise that PDF and note the variations in the (L & R) columns. See the type of clutch, transmission ratios, axle ratios, unladen weight, maximum weight, axle weight load, front/rear axle load splits, and unbraked trailer weight? Weight differences are carry-over factors, ie. weight of clutch/transmission affect total and axle weights. Gear and axle ratios affect speed and pulling power. The combination of those factors affect the unbraked trailer weight calculation - on the left 700kg and on the right 720kg. (NOT 750kg) Not a lot of difference? Audi certainly couldn't afford to hide the huge towing strength 'selling advantage' v lower fuel mileage. Could you afford to ignore such a small weight difference? On the slim chance you got a Polizei stop, (as unbraked trailers are inherently less stable at speed they do tend to look very closely at them) it could cost €€€ + points in Flensburg. Of course, in the light of any accident claim, insurers tend to be far more adept at scrutiny of fine details than the Polizei need be.

 

Being more at home with 2 - 2.5t car trailers and LKW trailers from 3.5t - 10.0t (all limited to 80km/h) I had to look up the current 100km/h rules on light car trailers. I've found out, and translated, all you need to know in order to be able to calculate for each towing situation you encounter. You'd need to know the specifics of the trailer in question as well as your car, but (as long as you can read the small print on your KFZ-schein) B) it's fairly straightforward.

 

 

Section 5 No. 1 StVO (notwithstanding § 18) Certain cars with trailer, certain multi-track vehicles, with a gross vehicle weight of up to 3.5t. (if) 100-km/h-Authorised, and buses with a gross vehicle weight exceeding 3.5 tonnes with a trailer may go up to 100 km / h on highways and motorways.

 

For this purpose, the following requirements must be met by the combination of vehicles:

Towing vehicle with ABS in conjunction with trailer without brakes or trailers with brakes, but without hydraulic shock absorbers:

 

Authorised mass of the trailer ≤ 0.3 × unladen mass of the towing vehicle

 

Towing vehicle with ABS in conjunction with travel trailers with brakes and hydraulic shock absorbers:

 

Authorised mass of the trailer ≤ 0.8 × unladen mass of the towing vehicle or ≤ 1.0 × unladen mass of the towing vehicle, if equipped with a sway coupling in accordance with ISO 11555-1 or with any other technical means by which means parts certificate / ABE, the operation of combination has been proven to 120 km / h

 

Towing vehicle with ABS, in conjunction with other transporters (eg. horse trailers) with brake and hydraulic shock absorbers:

 

Authorised mass of the trailer ≤ 1.1 × unladen mass of the towing vehicle or ≤ 1.2 × unladen mass of the towing vehicle, if equipped with a sway coupling in accordance with ISO 11555-1 or with any other technical means by which means parts certificate / ABE, the operation of combination has been proven to 120 km / h

 

For all kinds of combinations also applies: Authorised mass of the trailer ≤ permitted weight of the towing vehicle,

 

Authorised mass of the trailer ≤ permissible trailer load as shown in its registration certificate,

 

Tyres of the trailer have not been issued, for 100 km / h, a load index surcharge (? not sure - think surcharge is suboptimal translation in this case)

 

(original text = hat für 100 km/h keinen Zuschlag zum Lastindex erhalten),

 

Tyres of the trailer is at least the speed category L (= 120 km / h),

 

Tyres of the trailer are less than 6 years old.

 

Official sealed 100-plaque on the trailer must be placed in a visible from the rear position.

 

The mass information can be found in the entries in the vehicle registration

 

(Empty Weight: No. 14, Authorised mass. No. 15, or G and F.1/F.2 fields in the new registration certificate I.).

 

The 100-km/h-Zulassung is governed by the 'Ninth Regulation on Exemptions from the requirements for Road Traffic Regulations' („Neunte[n] Verordnung über Ausnahmen von den Vorschriften zur StVO“). The limitation of the Regulation until 31 December 2010 has been repealed. [2] It shall therefore continue indefinitely.

 

Source: 100-km/h-Zulassung

 

Blank Fahrzeugschein gif/s (could use to upload entry examples)

 

Interpret your Fahrzeugschein (In German)

 

Muster KFZ-Schein und Brief ohne Ende

 

HTH

 

2B

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Right 2B, it is a Q! :blink:

 

Sorry about the link to the 2004, it was the most recent one I could find and I thought a ballpark number would suffice. Apparently not...

 

My idea was that since I'm gonna get a trailer anyways it might as well be a larger one so that I won't have space issues no matter what I transport. Frankly anything over a ton and I couldn't stand the strain on the car anyways (not sure how the automatic would handle it anyways). At no time will I go anywhere near the load limit!

 

That talk of 120km just means they have been tested to 120km but are not allowed to go 120km right? :unsure:

 

Dude, I'll get this figured out eventually.

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Hope this isn't a double post-I am new. So anyway, I am taking my writtnen TUV test in Essen (for the 2nd time!) tomorrow and still am foggy about the generic regualtions for trailer and auto towing capacites and loads. do you have a resource that I can checkout? Thanks. Worried in Essen.

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Along those lines I want to get a trailer hitch put on my car as well. Got a quote from the Ford dealer 1100 fixed, 1500 removable. Just wondering if anyone has gotten one from a place like ATU. Want to know if it's worth stopping in or not. I looked online and the parts cost 160 for the cables, 305 for the hitch and 150€ or so for labour. So round 700€ What I can't tell is if the hitch includes all the parts or are those extra. 

 

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I put one in our old VW T4 from Pitstop (similar chain to ATU), it was in the same price bracket, I think I paid around 500 EUR with a 7-poll connection (less wires). If you know that you will never carry a trailer with brakes then you can choose the 7-poll version because it is cheaper. The thing is from Westfalia so I assume the quality is good. The price included everything that was needed. And we are happy with it.

Something about the removable ones that not many people know. If you have a removable one then you are supposed to remove it every time you are not using it. The reason? because in case of an accident the damages on the other car will increase. I have a removable in our other car and while it is not rocket science it is still a PITA to put it in and out every time, so I neglect it and keep it on most times.

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Some cars are pre-wired for pulling trailers, and there is a plug in the back that you can just attach your wiring kit to - easy.  Mounting the hitch is the easy part, just a matter of doing up a few bolts, holding your tongue in the right way, and yelling a few aptly timed swear words and before you know it, it's in.  However, if you have to install a wiring kit into the car, that is a major headache - you have to drill a hole in your car to allow the cable through, and splice your wiring set into the correct wires governing the lights in your car.  It involves removing the interior panels, running a cable to the fuse panel under the hood, and figuring out which wires are which... I won't be taking on that particular project again.  You might need to get the hitch inspected by TÜV and have it eingetragen into your Fahrzeugschein.

 

 

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