Moving to Germany after finishing high school

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Not sure if this belongs here, sorry if it doesn't. I searched through all the other threads and none of them meet my situation. This is still my first post, but I do plan on becoming more active here afterwards. Now then;

 

I'm still in High School and I'm confronted with 2 options. Get my NYC (44 credit) diploma, which is probably going to be incredibly hard to get since I'm lacking quite a bit of credits. My other option is switching to keystone online school, where I'd need 21 to get their HS diploma. My ultimate plans are to get my diploma while saving up a good $10-25k, then move to Germany, become a citizen and then afterwards join the military. If I do go to Germany, I'd still have to wait 6-8 years for citizenship, meaning I'd have to get a job. Is it possible for non-citizens to become cops or firefighters (full time) with either of those diplomas? I read that an American HS diploma is equivalent to a Realschule, and I'm only really looking for a Hauptschule. I also read that German jobs are picky when it comes to credits, so how many credits does a hauptschule need in each subject?

 

I did good on the PSATs, and I think I would do above 1300 on the SAT, which I read would give an Abitur? Once I get to Germany, what would I be required to do? I know I would have to apply for a residence visa, etc, but would I have to take German classes? What if I go there speaking nearly fluent German (which I'm working on)? Would I have to actually get a Hauptschule/Realschule or just use my HS transcript?

 

I know a few of these have been answered on the forums somewhere, and I've been doing alot of digging, but I would just like confirmations. Thanks

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You need to re-think your plan. You'll not be able to obtain a work/residence permit with only a high school diploma. Start by reading the wiki.

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Germany has enough unskilled labour and is trying to attract skilled professionals and skilled trades in certain areas. Under what category do you think you can obtain a work permit?

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I was just talking to someone and he suggested learning something about IT. Since I would like to leave the US at 18, would I be able to become and IT tech on my own free time, then obtain a work permit?

 

Like I said before, my ultimate goal would be the Bundeswehr after citizenship (unless it's possible as a US citizen?), but the 6-8 years of waiting for citizenship, I was hoping Police (I read that doesn't need citizenship) or full time firefighter.

 

My friend currently owns/hosts VPS nodes all over the world and he suggested learning IT on our free time. Would that be possible?

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Why don't you keep working on your degree in the US, with a strong focus on german language. ( You are studying it, right?)

 

And take advantage of an excellent program to study in Germany for FREE with the Congress Bundestag Exchange: http://www.usagermanyscholarship.org/ They have exchange programs for high school students and young adults.

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I'm still in US high school, I don't plan on going to college. I'm learning German in my free time (pimsleur, learning off the internet).

 

If I learned IT stuff in my free time, would that make me a skilled person, therefore being able to immigrate to Germany, even though it won't be through college?

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Highly skilled = doctors, electrical engineers, etc. There are certain professions for which shortages have been identified and visas are a bit easier to get. Why don't you want to go to college or other formal training?

 

Why Germany?

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I'm hoping for Germany because I descend from Germany, I want to leave the US because it's a horrible country. Germany seems the best choice because it has a top 3 strongest economy, it's military is far "better" than the US military, the culture, people, and language all are amazing. I've read all over this site that German universities and jobs don't stress official documents that much, then I've been told they do as well.

 

Once again, is it possible for a US citizen to join the Bundeswehr? If so, is that a good enough reason for a residence/work permit? I really plan on leaving at age 18 or 19, and it's really not possible for me to go to college in that time. I can take a few high school or even college courses online for IT stuff, but I doubt that would do much. What if I got a study permit, went to Germany to get a degree, then would I be allowed to get a residence/work permit? Would that 2 years count towards citizenship time?

 

EDIT: Highly skilled = doctors, electrical engineers, etc. There are certain professions for which shortages have been identified and visas are a bit easier to get. Why don't you want to go to college or other formal training?

 

I don't want college because I don't want to stay in the US past age 18 or 19, and I honestly see it as a waste of money, and I don't do so well in any education system because of standardization. I'm not sure if it's different in Germany. But like I said, I'm going to start learning all kinds of coding languages and IT stuff in my free time, and assuming I can become sufficient in these, would that be enough to get a residence/visa?

 

On top of all this, I have to rant about degrees being stupidly pointless, because a worthless piece of paper isn't able to measure intelligence.

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But like I said, I'm going to start learning all kinds of coding languages and IT stuff in my free time, and assuming I can become sufficient in these, would that be enough to get a residence/visa?

 

Probably not. The germans care a lot about apprenticeships and certificates. They are much more formal about qualifications than Americans. A lot of American employers will look at work history and a proven track record and decide that yes, the applicant can do the job. The Germans (employers, universities, etc.) want something official.

 

But don't take my word for it. www.conversationexchange.com helps people find partners for tandem language exchange; you can practice your Deutsch Sprache and learn more about Germany!

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Ah. If I got a study permit, went to Germany, got an easy degree in IT stuff, would that time I spent in the country count towards citizenship?

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In some German states half the time you spend as a student counts towards permanent residence (the citizenship application comes later), in other states it doesn't count at all.

 

What kind of "easy IT degree" would you be looking at?

 

Stay in the U.S., get a solid college education under your belt and then consider moving here if it still appeals to you.

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Go to college! Sure, a big part of it is bullshitting, and no, grades/standardized tests don't ALWAYS reflect intelligence, but that's the game! I hate paying 55 euro each month on my transport ticket – I don't think its a fair price – but that's just what it cost. (insert short sentence explaining analogy) If you EVER want upward mobility in ANY European/North American country you'll need a BA at least – I'm no expert in the Bundeswehr, but climbing the ranks there probably won't be easy without university. The best you can hope for is a stable income, with little opportunity to improve your standard of living – or to flex your brain muscles a bit. You seem lie at smart guy – don't waste your obviously natural curiosity! Plus, dude, for realz, the US is NOT that bad. Some things suck here as well!

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Schulzeugnisse, Arbeitszeugnisse... German employers are ALL about the documents. I did an online MS in IT while working as a US Army contractor, figuring it would be way more impressive to a German employer than it would be to an American one. Indeed, it was. Personally, it made me a bit sad, as my BS in Computer Science at a very competitive traditional university was far harder to get, but on a completely practical level, gosh am I glad I did that master's!

 

Germany is still short qualified IT staff, but unless your German is excellent and you have several years of mid-level work experience (which you most certainly don't), there is no way you're getting a work permit without a degree. Even with a degree but without significant experience, it would be unlikely.

 

I concur with Erdbeere. If you think school is a bunch of games and BS, try most corporate jobs on either side of the pond :)

 

To get a student visa to Germany, you have to get into a German university. To do that for an undergraduate degree, you have to do well on the TestDaF or the like (B2-equivalent at a bare minimum) and have good high school results to even be considered. Ask yourself this: why on earth would Germany give the child of parents who hadn't paid in 20-30 years worth of German income tax a free or cheap university education, especially if said child comes from a country with its own fantastic (if expensive) higher education system and is not an active humanitarian disaster zone?

 

Your best bet for either getting ahead in the US or getting over here at some point is to finish your NYC high school diploma getting the best grades you can, suffer the BS of prepping for and doing well on the SAT, and getting into state college.

 

And if you don't like "standardization," you will probably not like much of what life in Germany has to offer ("Ordnung" is considered to be a very, very good thing here). Please read about 1/2 the threads in the "Life in Germany" forum to see Americans, Brits, etc. complaining about German standardization :)

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I want to leave the US because it's a horrible country. Germany seems the best choice because it has a top 3 strongest economy, it's military is far "better" than the US military, the culture, people, and language all are amazing. I've read all over this site that German universities and jobs don't stress official documents that much, then I've been told they do as well.

 

Stay in skul an git egekat'd

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You will absolutely not be able to find a (good) job in Germany without a formal certificate/degree/education. No matter how much you know about IT or how much you taught yourself in your free time, no one will hire you (unless maybe a part-time job).

 

I don't know if that's possible or not as far as visa and regulations go, but I think a good course of action might be to do two years of college in the US and then apply at various universities here.

 

If moving to Germany is your dream, by all means, go for it. You're 18, if there ever is a good time to make your dreams come true, it's NOW. Just make sure you have all the information needed. You're up to a good a start by asking questions here, but whoever told you that you don't need formal anything to get a job in Germany, is basically full of shit (sorry).

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I have to rant about degrees being stupidly pointless, because a worthless piece of paper isn't able to measure intelligence.

 

Not intelligence, but diligence. Shows you are capable of responding to training.

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