Repaired washing machine returned is different

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Hi all,

 

I hope someone may be able to help or give me some advice. Brought my Bosch from the uk with me and its now about 5 years old.

 

Recently there was a problem and it wasnt spinning right and so we called out a repair man. He came and said it was the stabilisers and took it away to repair. When it came back everythng seemed fine to start with. Then we noticed small differences. The plug was no longer English, the liquid tray didnt slide/fit as well as before, the top was longer and the general sides and back were different. Rang the repair man back up and mentioned the differences.

 

To begin with he said it was ours but then admitted that it had fallen over and that he had changed the outside (shell) but that it was still our washing machine inside. We were obviously extremley annoyed that he hadnt told us and now we are not sure if we have our machine back. We have the model number but i was wondering if there was anything on the motor/machine (inside) that has the model number on or the Bosch stamp that we can check to make sure that it is our Bosch machine and not a different/cheaper model.

 

Any help would be very much appreciated because we want to know if there is any hard evidence that it is our machine or not.

 

Cheers

rob_eng8

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it will have a serial number, which you should have on docs, but this may well have been on the housing, usually on back near power inlet. Often the serial number is repeated internally, but this will involve removing the covers.

 

Did you get it in writing that they damaged your original machine and they housing was exchanged?

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You should ask (even after the fact) for a repair report detailing work carried out and components modified or changed including any repairs or changes made as a result of their actions. If you have any reason to believe that work was carried out, or parts changed that are different to this report and are to your detriment (e.g. older, cheaper or alternative manufacturers components) then you should take legal advice.

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Thanks Sprudel & YorkshireLad6

 

We have had nothing in writing from him other than a hand written bill which unfortunately we paid at the time. We asked for an official bill and he said he would send one through detailling all work etc. Everything else so far has only been verbal ie admitting damage and changing of the cover. The old cover did have the model number on etc but we now want to see if there is anywhere inside with on it to see if he is lying or not.

 

I am strongly strting to think he has changed it but want to be 100% sure before contacting our lawyer.

 

Thanks again

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That's why you need a repair report to give him the chance to admit to everything he did, admit to any mistakes and the remedial action he has taken. If you get the repair report and subsequently find it is not accurate, or to your detriment (that bit is important as he may even have replaced parts with better ones) then you have every good reason to turn to the law.

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if the wash machine came from the UK... there is a very very high probabillity that it was a "hot fill" machine..

 

Did you use a Splitter to feed cold water into both inlets?

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if the wash machine came from the UK... there is a very very high probabillity that it was a "hot fill" machine..

 

It's not a high probability whatsoever.

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Dont believe it is/was a hot fill. It has worked fine for the last 5 years, 3 in the Uk and 2 here.

 

@ YorkshireLad6 - we have now requested a breakdown of repairs, the damage caused and hours worked etc in writing. My question is then how do I find out if the report is accurate or not? He says he only changed the outside and that it is our machine on the inside. Assuming the report says the same thing, then how do I go about proving that he has in fact changed the whole machine?

 

Before it was taken away I took a picture of the sticker on the back with the model number etc on - so i have this. What I can´t seem to determine is if there is any corresponding number to this on the actual drum or motor. If there is and the number on ours is now different then I know it is a different machine.

 

As for it runnning, it has been fine since but it definately sounds different. I realise that this doesnt prove anything and could simply be due to the change in parts.

 

Thanks again

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Once he has committed to describing his work in writing you'll need to have someone independently check it and compare the current state with what he has written (this will cost money). If they don't agree you have your evidence for a claim, which can include the cost of the independent survey. If they do agree, then you have to eat the cost of the survey yourself. Remember too that there is a risk he's actually improved the machine. You can't claim for that...

 

Personally if it still functions as a washing machine I'd let sleeping dogs lie. A poorly fitting tray may just be some distortion following disassembly and may be a small thing that the original repair guy is prepared to fix. "Different sounding" may be as a result of new bearings, or suspension.

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the Bosch stamp that we can check to make sure that it is our Bosch machine and not a different/cheaper model.

 

Do you have the manual that came with your machine? It probably mentions the model number. You can then compare it with the model number on your machine's new "face" to get a preliminary indication as to whether they switched your machine with a cheaper model.

 

I personally wouldn't suspect foul play. The economics don't work out: if they indeed brought you a working German Bosch washing machine and kept a 5-year-old defective UK model, how much profit can they really expect to make by selling the latter on the second-hand market?

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Ok, getting someone else to check it sounds like my only option. I thought that would be the last resort and had hoped to find other eveidence inside.

 

The problem is that I believe that the returned machine is not a Bosch at all, simply a cheaper alternative brand. I believe he has simply taken off the tray (facade with writing) from my Bosch and stuck it on another machine hence why the tray doesnt fit right and it sounds fifferent. When I queried him he originally said he had not done that, then he admitted he had changed the outside shell (because ours had been damaged) but that the inside was still my machine i.e a Bosch. That sounds like a lot of work to me. I want to be able to see or prove if the motor and drum are from a Bosch machine or not. I have the feeling and the fact he has already lied to me that he has simply put my facade on a cheaper machine therefore can only assume to make money who knows.

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i think it very unlikely parts from different manufacture's machines would be compatible, and unlikely one could just switch the shell over.

 

parts such as the detergent tray may well fit different models of similar age, but different brands - unlikely.

 

Can you look up photos of your model and compare?

 

Is the sound worse or better? It has been serviced, so should sound better.

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I’d prepared this (before Gypsy Marianne posted) in Word intending to post, but got sidelined when overheating chips (CPU) demanded an instant laptop shutdown and rearrangement of the interior rebuild I’d done 2 days earlier. Sorry, I forgot afterwards until I saw it come up again to-day. Please ignore any points which may now be redundant.

 

I’m a wee bit suspicious of the story your man’s telling you, RobEng8. If the machine was too old to get parts for, or the repair had proven to be uneconomic, then he could and should have contacted you before doing any other work than he’d proposed. Imagine if you’d taken your car to a workshop and its sheet metal had got damaged; there’s no way in the world anyone would even dream of a change of bodywork.

 

I suspect he has switched more than parts of the bodywork of your machine as it sounds more like a quick change of machine for even less honest reasons. If he’d known he had a near match in the back room he could’ve been thinking he’s going to find, or has already got, a new and more profitable customer for your ‘youngtimer’ model.

 

OTOH, to be fair to him, part switching is a possibility as IME more ‘badge engineering’ exists in the EU white goods market than in the entire worldwide car market. AFAIR, even 20 years ago, the only German company actually manufacturing all its own machines was Mielé with Siemens, Bosch, Bauknecht and most other brands sharing bulk manufacturing capacity of Italian built, Indesit designed, washers, dryers, dishwashers and, ( particularly easy to spot by the changes in internal accessories), refrigerators.

 

When you say cover do you mean the top cover or the front panel? Top covers are commonly available in a variety of heights to match varying European worktop heights or bulk kitchen manufacturer’s designs. Also, in some cases, the need for stacking adapters for dryers is overcome by OEM options.

 

Here’s the help you’d get on machine IDs from Bosch Customer Service | Bosch Home Appliances on washing machines…

 

 

Identify your appliance

To help you, we need the E-Nr (model) and FD (production) numbers. Locate rating plate

 

If you need to find your E-NR (model number) and FD (production) number, you will find these on the appliance rating plate. Please choose your appliance type to find out where to locate the rating plate.

post-89810-13541051261342.png <<<THIS PIC of 7 machine styles may have slipped to below the text>>>

 

You can also view our video on how to find the rating plate containing the E-NR and FD numbers.

 

Find an online version of the instruction manual for your appliance. Download manuals

 

Browse replacement spare parts, accessories and our range of tested and approved cleaning and care products. Buy spares and accessories

Further potentially useful info & links from Bosch UK...

 

 

 

Many common issues can be solved by checking our FAQs and videos. Browse online help

(Their only near-relevant) FAQs:

· Repeated spin cycles

Unbalanced load detection system is activated The unbalanced load detection system attempts to level out the imbalance using repeated spin cycles.

Please wash large and small items together to reduce the imbalance.

 

· Appliance experiences strong vibrations or moves

Large imbalance Where possible, wash large and small items together to reduce the imbalance.

Incorrect alignment (e.g. after being moved) Level the appliance using the appliance feet and secure them in accordance with the installation instructions.

The flooring is susceptible to vibrations (e.g. suspended wood floor) If possible, position the appliance in the corner of a room. Place a board (30 mm thick, water-resistant) underneath and screw it down to the wooden flooring. Please follow the instructions in the instruction manual.

 

In a past life my US partner and I won a contract to clear the majority of post-Cold War draw-down stocks of US Military household Washers/Dryers/Refrigerators/Ranges (Cookers) in Germany. About 15% of these gigaloadz ™ had been schlechterverbessert by Siemens acquired defects in transit, collection or storage. We had to learn-by-doing while teaching our guys about, repairs on all makes, US & European. Fortunately I’d learned lessons in the old-school as an apprentice mechanic when holding ‘Christmas trees’ in our back area to strip supplementing the OEM parts dept on no-longer-supported models was often the only way to help our most loyal workshop customers.

 

Since those days thanks to the intawebz, info and advice has got easier to find for everyman so, based on my own, (and the stuck Turkish washer door incident that TTer coyote3000 was able to remotely solve in Istanbul), experience, I’m posting the rest of this here for the benefit of any readers drawn by the search box to this thread.

 

Here are the best universal sources of advice on all types of domestic white goods problems I know of. Washerhelp site map and the no frills, but more updated, search engine version http://search.washer...tenbr=155679078 The site owner’s associated with other independent techs all over the UK including a cooperative source of Appliance repair advice & resources and Washing Machine Spares post-89810-13541055408303.jpg

 

Here’s their Bosch Washing Machine Spares page. For Bosch Washing Machines alone they list 15208 (!!!) spares, but not one calling itself a stabiliser though. Perhaps your repairman’s making up the part to fit the script of his play either using a colloquial functional description or a mistranslation may have arisen. To be fair, I too called them stabilisators when talking to the techs at Siemens myself as that's the correct German nomenclature.

 

In your situation, prior to contacting your repairman again, I’d research not only your E & FD numbers, but also the actual part numbers and their OEM and aftermarket prices. Try to get a download of the service manual PDF from Bosch or the other sites above. If they haven’t got the exploded parts diagrams then put "Bosch+Washer+your original E-Nr & FD-Nr" in to a Google picture search to trawl the web for them. The diagrams, usually including OEM part numbers, are out there. Then you can check Bosch for OEM, the independents for OEM equivalent part prices.

 

If you know the actual part names, numbers and nett prices, you’ve then got the long end of the lever in your hands. Forewarned being forearmed, the ability to demonstrate sound countering reasons before him telling you to any BS should encourage him to really play it straight rather than risk any legal case. I would hope, by giving him a chance to save face, you could avoid even the need to threaten him with the law. Dealing with it on a quid pro quo (mutual respect) basis may be the quickest way to regain your (just possibly younger and more valuable) original machine in toto.

 

HTH

 

2B

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