Grammar police

181 posts in this topic

 

Oh dear weren't you ever taught the difference between their (i.e. belonging to them) and they're (the abbreviation of they are?)

 

Nick, Nick, Nick...Could have used a comma (pause) after "Oh dear". Just sayin' :P It was just screaming for it.

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Well spotted Jim, my only excuse is the drunk weekend at a wedding and having travelled for 7 hours.

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In: Allershausen

Joined: 20.Jun.2005

 

"Here's something to keep the Grammar fans busy: Grammar and punctuation test." Post 107; sorry, am not managing to quote properly.

 

In questions 2,3 and 4 you are asked about three sentences. But the sentence examples have no full stop!! Am I missing some crucial convention here?

 

(Got 13, also tripped up by pride!)

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Oh dear. Weren't you ever taught the difference between their (i.e. belonging to them) and they're (the contraction of they are)?

 

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Wrong Tony, as NoBullJim pointed out, there was only a comma missing at the beginning but I admit to using abbreviation instead of contraction, although this is just a question of vocabulary and not grammar!

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"Wrong, Tony. As NoBullJim pointed out, there was only a comma missing at the beginning. But I admit to using the word abbreviation instead of contraction, although this is just a question of vocabulary and not grammar!"

 

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Q: What do you say when you are comforting a grammar Nazi? A: There, Their, They're.

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I don't know where you learnt English Fuzzytony, but at school I was taught never to begin a sentence with the word "but", maybe you should go back again! :P

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From The Chicago Manual of Style:

 

 

"There is a widespread belief — one with no historical or grammatical foundation — that it is an error to begin a sentence with a conjunction such as 'and', 'but', or 'so'. In fact, a substantial percentage (often as many as 10 percent) of the sentences in first-rate writing begin with conjunctions. It has been so for centuries, and even the most conservative grammarians have followed this practice. Charles Allen Lloyd, the author of We Who Speak English, observed the phenomenon and noted this: "Next to the groundless notion that it is incorrect to end an English sentence with a preposition, perhaps the most wide-spread of the many false beliefs about the use of our language is the equally groundless notion that it is incorrect to begin one with "but" or "and." As in the case of the superstition about the prepositional ending, no textbook supports it, but apparently about half of our teachers of English go out of their way to handicap their pupils by inculcating it. One cannot help wondering whether those who teach such a monstrous doctrine ever read any English themselves.""

Also, you have a comma split in your comment, Nick. And you've omitted a comma before addressing a person.

 

 

I don't know where you learnt English Fuzzytony, but at school I was taught never to begin a sentence with the word "but", maybe you should go back again!

Better to write it as, "I don't know where you learned/learnt English, FuzzyTony, but at school I was taught never to begin a sentence with the word "but"; maybe you should go back to school!"

 

Notice I inserted the semicolon to remove the comma split? Alternatively, you can start a new sentence with "maybe", rather than a semicolon.

 

"I don't know where you learned English, FuzzyTony, but at school I was taught never to begin a sentence with the word "but". Maybe you should go back to school!"

 

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In this case just a question of vocabulary:

 

 

Sure they can.. Weather they have a case, or can find a lawyer to take the case is a different story..

 

 

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In this case just a question of vocabulary:

 

Maybe that case has some overcast... :lol:

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10 hours ago, fuzzytony said:

I want to buy the T-shirt. ^_^

 

Grammar.jpg.f374a816b537ebf07d7655436628

 

The Twitter account Grammar Police is one I follow. 

 

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Can you please post a link to where I an buy that t-shirt?

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