Grammar police

187 posts in this topic

Their solution block sucks. For some questions you have to go back and read the whole question and answer block again until you realize which one they are marking as correct. I tripped over Hilary.

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Oh, come on. Just read the questions carefully. It's even OK to read the question, then read the sample answers and reread the question. And even use logic if your grammar is a little shaky.

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I don't know. It's been several lifetimes since I was ten and I don't remember what we were expected to know. I would think that anyone, including those 10-year-olds, could come up with at least seven right answers. In a couple of those questions spelling is key to an answer. Punctuation: I don't know about UK schools, but I know that in the Vierte Klasse my Vierling learned all the punctuation marks and their usage, and he wasn't nine yet.

 

ADDENDUM: This was in Landkreis Rosenheim, in Bayern.

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Yes, the German kids in 4. Klasse (aged 9 to 10) all know about subordinate clauses and how commas are used with them which is great, considering it's not even on the curriculum for 4. Klasse (they get as far as Subjekt and Prädikat). Well, in my state anyway.

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I have been tutoring a kid for these since January, he is not phased by the new SpaG, it is the reading test that we have found a bit tricky here and there, he has english as his second language, and some of the questions rely on a broader language understanding base that he is lacking.

 

Reading booklet and questions to match.

 

To be honest, without the answer booklet, I was far too generous in my assessment, and it was a bit of a shock to realise how tight the whole thing is.

 

The test is looking to place the kids on a scale of 3c,b,a up to 5a, with the aimed for national average at this age being a 4b. So you can stuff a lot up and still be within an OK range. You can apply for a level 6 test for this age, which would be interesting to see. From the above links you can access all of it and irritate your 10/11 year olds no end. Might try it out on mine for a laugh...

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It's the fact they're doing it at all that's wrong. I'm on David Crystal's side (since his works are like bibles to me):

 

http://david-crystal.blogspot.com.au/2013/05/on-testing-time.html?m=1

 

Am also on the side of the Cambridge NC Review Panel and any authority on teaching English in primary schools, most of whom (if not all) are against it.

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I dunno, it produces statistics which are apparently helpful in identifying problem areas both school-wise and curriculum-wise, over the whole country. I am iritated by how much effort goes into these things, compared to my Drittklaessler who came home today entirely unconcerned, saying "Mama, we have those Vergleichungsarbeiten AGAIN and you know what's really bad? We did one in Deutsch even though it was the Mathe stunde..." - there does honestly seem to be a world of difference in the way these things are dealt with here and in the UK, and I have not had a problem with how they have been administered here. It is also possible that there is hype, but it passes me by, but this is our 4th 3rd Klaessler, and I think even I would have caught on by now...

 

edit KZV - not read your edited links, and can't now, but look forward to them later. Is there a similar feeling here against the Vera tests? It all just seems so much more sane and less awful here, somehow.

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I know our 3rd grade teachers dislike the VERA tests (doing them this week too). I just feel that SpAG is another SATs in a way in terms of unnecessary stress. It's a bit pointless, just like the phonic non-word "reading" test. Testing for the sake of it. But governments love their statistics, don't they?

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We were chatting this evening about teaching the phonic test as nonsense poetry and then just getting everyone to recite it together, otherwise someone is going to be drinking an awful lot of coffee to sit through that lot separately :) - my alternative suggestion was to get class spod to read his/hers really loudly at the front, while the others get to mumble along a millisecond later. Which shows that everyone feels this is another crappy waste of time, I guess.

 

Of course, for the record, all will be done beautifully properly in sterilised conditions when the time comes, obviously, but dreaming is still ok...

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couldn't find a better place to park this grammar rant, so here it goes. (For the record: I don't consider myself to be a "grammar Nazi" as in general I couldn't give less of a monkey's how people write as long as their meaning is clear, and since most self-proclaimed GNs seem to believe having a third-grader's command of the language, e.g., knowing the difference between possessive and pronoun, suffices to qualify them sort as of grammar prodigies.)

 

From WHENCE. From WHENCE it came, you ninny. You think you're so highfalutin' with your no-longer-necessary-in-Modern-English avoidance of sticking a preposition at the end of a clause, but then you go and stick from WHERE on it and think everybody will be impressed with your mad English skillz. Wrong, mofo, wrong. Almost as silly and infuriating as people who use "whom" in the nominative. Mixing your with you're = forgivable. Making a show of getting it rite whilst getting it rong = makes Wayne Brady wanna choke a bitch

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Yes, from whence sounds very Shakespearean to my Pacific coast ears. I don't believe I've ever heard anyone actually say it. Who/ whom errors are ubiquitous here, however.

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Whilst is one that sounds too antiquated and pretentious to me. I know people like using it to sound classy, but it I think it comes across as very Shakespearean.

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