What is "Endivien"?

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The local markets this week just started selling something called "Endivien" which doesn't quite look like the escarole that I used to buy in the states, but neither does it look like curly Endive. Is it a third plant? Or just a different variety of escarole?

 

The guy at the farmstand says they just eat it like salad, but I want to cook with it like I would with escarole. I guess I can always just try, but I'm wondering if I'm going to waste a lovely large head of lettuce!

 

This is what what I bought looks like: endivien

And this is what I think of escarole as looking like: escarole

And what curly endive looks like: curly endive

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http://dict.leo.org/ende?lp=ende&lang=de&searchLoc=0&searchLocRelinked=1&search=Endivie

 

what does it look like: http://de.images.search.yahoo.com/search/images;_ylt=A7x9QXy.qnZQUh4Ae54zCQx.?p=endivien&fr=yfp-t-708&fr2=piv-web

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anyway they taste horrid ditch 'em.

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I don't think language translation sites are going to help here. Even in English the terms are often confused, because both curly endive and escarole are kinds of endive (as are belgian endive and frisee)!

 

I added links to photos in my original post.

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I just had a google, and I concur - Endivien and escarole seem to be the same thing. Must say I don't buy it much, as I prefer salad greens that are less "frilly", plus the last few times I bought it, it was quite bitter. Never occurred to me to cook it, but will have to try. I love baked chicoree (wrap in ham or bacon, with tomato/port sauce), so Endivien shouldn't be too much of stretch. Do you have any favorite recipes you'd be willing to share?

 

EDIT: Looking at the links that have since gone up. I'm referring to the normal Endivien, not the curly one, and would venture that your "normal" Endivien is actually escarole.

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So looking at the German wikipedia pages I suspect that what I call escarole is called "Glatte Endivie" and what I bought is called "Winter Endivie." I don't think I've seen this variety in the States. I guess I just have to try cooking with it and see what happens. Escarole (hopefully) and greens, here I come!

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I don't usually follow a recipe, but if you look for "escarole and beans" you should find plenty. Here's a nytimes recipe and one from the food network.

 

I've also seen escarole in lots of Italian soup recipes, often but not always with beans. Sometimes it's simply sauteed with garlic and served as a side dish.

 

Here are a few more recipes from the nytimes, but I haven't tried them myself.

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Thanks very much, Captious! I'm not big on following recipes myself, but like to browse different ones and then do my own thing - and the links you've given are ideal for that. :)

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Uuuuggh, Westvan... what has been seen cannot be unseen. That looks 'orrible, I don't care if it's Mama's Rezept or not! :blink:

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I concur. I found the picture appalling. Not that my escarole and beans is so pretty. But with tomato sauce and white beans and some parmesan sprinkled on top it's at least disguised a bit.

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We've got it in our garden late season and the wife likes to boil "mehlig" potatoes into a brei thingy, then add oil and vinegar and coat the bugger in it. Quite tasty as endive alone is bitter.

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Oh yeah, Stamppot. The Flemish do that too. But we're talking about Endivien here, not Andijvie. Don't get us all confused! :P

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Uuuuggh, Westvan... what has been seen cannot be unseen.

 

I know! Sludge garnishes with parsley.

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Does chicory count as endive too? We've made it by cutting it in half long ways, breading the top and then baking it in the oven until soft. I've also had it raw in salads. It's a little too bitter for my taste.

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I know endive only prepared as a salad.It was one of the greens which could be stored for any length of time in the fall and supply us poor people with vitamin besides Kraut(Kohl for you Preissn).As for bitterness,that was done away with by bundling the leaves with a string for a week before it was pulled to make the inside leaves yellow,In a cool place bundled up they could be stored for some time. Outside leaves provided some protection against light frost and were discarded before using the rest of the plant.I tried it here too and it worked in some years when the heavy frost did not come to soon.Would have worked this year, but I'm getting lazy and cut my garden in half and did not plant any.

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