Becoming a German State Teacher.

78 posts in this topic

Out of curiosity let me just test your joint ability to design, follow or deliver a short lesson plan even though...*

 

LeCheese's kids and I appreciate that none of you are intending to become German State Teachers

 

 

hmm...

Awaits result of test with bated breath.

 

2B

 

PS: @dessa_dangerous I don't get it either.

If I use the tags with other commands (e.g. for italics bolds strike-thru) with square brackets and a forward slash in the end tag and without any spacing between as per your own example they work fine. If I do exactly the same but with the word spoiler instead then only the tags disappear

 

*Edited in appreciation of @LeCheese's extra effort! ;)

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44 minutes ago, dessa_dangerous said:

dang!  How, uh, lame ;)

 

muahahahahahahaha!!!

 

forum responds GIF

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5 minutes ago, 2B_orNot2B said:

[hide]I apreciate that none of you are intending to become German State Teachers[/hide]

 

My kids appreciate you will not either 

 

:lol::lol:

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7 hours ago, swimmer said:

I can only speak anecdotally but, yes, it seems to be a fairly common path, at least round my way, of course employment prospects are often very localised.  My impression would be that there are a range.  Some people I know who taught English go on into secondary schools, others are right at the start with the little kids.   Not sure if the routes would be the same, or of equivalent formality / quaifications etc.   

 

But when I say "common path", I am not talking about people with PhDs, of course.  I doubt they'd do that.  Of course you potentially have far more professional options to academia than school teaching.  

Can you enlighten me on that? I am so depressed that I am seeing a psychiatrist now.

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7 hours ago, franklan said:

Ok, so a native German kid writes this...

 

"I asked my father how long it would take and he appreciated that it would take three hours."

 

... and you have to explain what/where the mistake is.

 

How do you do that?

7 hours ago, franklan said:

Ok, so a native German kid writes this...

 

"I asked my father how long it would take and he appreciated that it would take three hours."

 

... and you have to explain what/where the mistake is.

 

How do you do that?

 

Quote

7 hours ago, swimmer said:

I can only speak anecdotally but, yes, it seems to be a fairly common path, at least round my way, of course employment prospects are often very localised.  My impression would be that there are a range.  Some people I know who taught English go on into secondary schools, others are right at the start with the little kids.   Not sure if the routes would be the same, or of equivalent formality / quaifications etc.   

 

But when I say "common path", I am not talking about people with PhDs, of course.  I doubt they'd do that.  Of course you potentially have far more professional options to academia than school teaching.  

Can you enlighten me on that? I am so depressed that I am seeing a psychiatrist now.

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7 hours ago, franklan said:

Ok, so a native German kid writes this...

 

"I asked my father how long it would take and he appreciated that it would take three hours."

 

... and you have to explain what/where the mistake is.

 

How do you do that?

7 hours ago, franklan said:

Ok, so a native German kid writes this...

 

"I asked my father how long it would take and he appreciated that it would take three hours."

 

... and you have to explain what/where the mistake is.

 

How do you do that?

 

Quote

7 hours ago, swimmer said:

I can only speak anecdotally but, yes, it seems to be a fairly common path, at least round my way, of course employment prospects are often very localised.  My impression would be that there are a range.  Some people I know who taught English go on into secondary schools, others are right at the start with the little kids.   Not sure if the routes would be the same, or of equivalent formality / quaifications etc.   

 

But when I say "common path", I am not talking about people with PhDs, of course.  I doubt they'd do that.  Of course you potentially have far more professional options to academia than school teaching.  

Can you enlighten me on that? I am so depressed that I am seeing a psychiatrist now. And the answer is, "

"I asked my father how long it would take and he appreciated that it would take three hours."

"I asked my father how long it would take and he said that it would take (around) three hours."

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9 minutes ago, solomongrundy said:

Can you enlighten me on that? I am so depressed that I am seeing a psychiatrist now.

 

Well, for example, have you looked into the private fachhochschule SRH? They are all over Germany and a friend of mine who has a Phd works there and is quite happy with pay and colleagues.

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1 hour ago, solomongrundy said:

 

Can you enlighten me on that? I am so depressed that I am seeing a psychiatrist now. And the answer is, "

"I asked my father how long it would take and he appreciated that it would take three hours."

"I asked my father how long it would take and he said that it would take (around) three hours."

Your German needs to be good enough to realize that the pupil meant "schätzen" (declinated "schätzte"); which should translate to "estimated", not "appreciated", in this case.

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12 hours ago, El Jeffo said:

Your German needs to be good enough to realize that the pupil meant "schätzen" (declinated "schätzte"); which should translate to "estimated", not "appreciated", in this case.

Exactly. "Schätzen" is a homonym, which is either "estimated" or "appreciated", depending on the context. Classic problem of looking up a word in a dictionary, failig to note it's a homonym and picking the unappropriate translation.

 

It's just like an English speaking pupil uttering something like "in die Molkerei schreiben". The German teacher's command of English must be good enough to grasp that the pupil blundered when looking up the word "diary" in the dictionary...

 

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So does this mean I cannot get a job? I am looking at the East. Saxony and Saxon Anhalt to be precise.

My German colleague told me that they are desperately looking for teachers. And if there are any other jobs that I could look at please let me know. 

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16 hours ago, solomongrundy said:

Can you enlighten me on that? I am so depressed that I am seeing a psychiatrist now.

 

Why are you so desperate to stay here? Is it really worth making yourself sick over it?

 

There are few opportunities in Germany for PhDs in non-technical fields who don't speak German (management consultancies, think tanks, and NGOs where the working language us English).

 

On the other hand you should have much better prospects applying for jobs where English is the working language.

 

41 minutes ago, solomongrundy said:

So does this mean I cannot get a job? I am looking at the East. Saxony and Saxon Anhalt to be precise.

My German colleague told me that they are desperately looking for teachers.

 

Have you checked the the requirements for the Bundesländer in which you would like to work?

 

Sachsen-Anhalt requires C1 German and at least one subject:

 

https://landesschulamt.sachsen-anhalt.de/personal-fuer-den-schuldienst/seiteneinsteiger/

 

Sachsen requires C1 German. After taking a quick look, it is not clear to me whether a specific Fächerkombination is required. 

 

https://www.lehrerbildung.sachsen.de/15764.htm

 

If you really want to try the public school route, contact the authorities ASAP regarding having your qualifications evaluated.

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Thank you Engelchen. I don t have much of a future if I go back. I don t want to go back to unemployment. I am in my late 40s now...I worked as a journalist for years decades ago before I chose academics.

I could try North America for a post doc but I have heard that they prefer US or Canadian PhDs,  and that it is not easy to find a job. Is that true?

 My skills are in writing and teaching and I don t know where I ll be a good fit. I also know French and Spanish.

I was foolish to fall for my professor's spiel regarding the PhD but he does not want to help me stay on.

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28 minutes ago, solomongrundy said:

I don t have much of a future if I go back. I don t want to go back to unemployment. I am in my late 40s now...I worked as a journalist for years decades ago before I chose academics.

 

Why do you assume your prospects are better here? Age discrimination is a much larger problem in Germany than in many other countries.

 

Quote

I could try North America for a post doc but I have heard that they prefer US or Canadian PhDs,  and that it is not easy to find a job. Is that true?

 

About 10 years ago I was told that I could have easily found a job as a lecturer in Canada after finishing my PhD (I never actually finished). However, I don't know how the market has changed since then. I think it is worth a try.

 

Quote

 My skills are in writing and teaching and I don t know where I ll be a good fit. I also know French and Spanish.

 

Given your skill set, you are at a huge disadvantage in Germany. Considering you've already been here almost 10 years and are only at B2 German, it is unlikely that you'll reach a level where you could write reports in German anytime soon, which greatly limits your options. 

 

Quote

I was foolish to fall for my professor's spiel regarding the PhD but he does not want to help me stay on.

 

Without a professor's support, it'll be difficult in your field in Germany.

 

Have you considered writing the Canadian Foreign Service Exam?

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I had assumed you were earlier career.  I spend time in the east and see these ads often, but you'd still need to tick the boxes as the above posts say.    If you think you have no prospects elsewhere, you might want to consider putting in the training.    If you *could* actually do it, your prospects would then probably be reasonably solid.  But it it worth it for you?  One thing about those examples I mentioned, they all had local families, kids to support, and were usually second incomes (even the men).  They had reasons to stick it out, and fallbacks.   Perhaps - looking coldly - you might not?  You might be better back home or in a different international academic setting.

 

A traditional route for people in your situ seems to have been entering employed roles at the language centres of Universities (or a big language school if you have such a thing).   That might be one route but ops my be thin on the ground, and I am talking a generation back now.

 

My own opinion is that, if we have not been parachuted in by an organisation and we want to survive in the labour market fairly autonomously, and with decent pay and conditions, especially outside of the most bouyant business areas,  your German needs to be as good as possible and quite high, as the above entry levels indicate.  (Round my way, even those Uni language centre roles run in German really).   And then you probably need a specialist relevant skill on top, to get decent rewards that pay back the effort and cost of migration.   

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