Becoming a German State Teacher.

78 posts in this topic

Dear TTs,

 

I am currently working towards becoming a State Qualified Teacher for my home country but have always wanted to become state qualified in Germany also. However, having already invested a lot of time into study don't want to go back to scratch.

 

I have trying to find information on whether it is possible to have my qualifications recognised for German state schools and had almost given up when I found the thread below.

 

http://www.toytowngermany.com/forum/index.php?showtopic=214175

 

So now I know it is possible but still not sure on what one needs to do to do these Staatsexams without going through the whole German education system again.

 

Has anyone or is anyone with out a Germany qualification completed or currently doing their Teacher Staatsexams? What did you have to or what did you do to be allowed to take / complete them?

 

Any advice or information you can give me is greatly appreciated.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Since education is Ländersache, the exact requirements vary by Bundesland. Generally you'll need C2 German and two Lehrfächer (subjects that you are qualified to teach). In practice, Länder that need teachers seem to be more lenient and flexible. See the Berufliche Anerkennung website for more info.

3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I work in German schools. As engelchen said, it is really different by the Länder. I am doing substitute teaching at the moment because it is easier to get that in my Land (NRW) if you didn't study here and you only need a Bachelor's degree. I am planning on doing that for 2 years and then applying for permanent positions. For the substitute teaching here, you don't need a teaching degree, as long as you are teaching what you studied or are teaching language that is your first language. It might also be good for you to start that way because the German schools are very different than to the schools where I grew up and I would assume it be the same for you so you will know what is up before you find a job where they have to monitor some of your lessons (which happens when you are working towards being allowed to have a permanent position.

2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Guys

 

thanks for the replies.

 

Engelchen I had a feeling it varied from State to State, it does in Oz too but most of the States now have a treaty or something equally as weird recognising the other States qualifications (with the exception of NSW for any of those wanting to teach in Oz) before that it was hard to move between States as a teacher.

 

I was aware about the language level too I though C1 sufficed though. I am probably a low B2 so got a bit of work yet. But I need a new goal. Thanks for the link, I noticed you always have these useful links years of collecting?

 

PLS thanks for the account of your experience I was unaware you could relief teach in some States without a teaching qualification I will definitely try that before officially qualifying naja again under the German systems. I have the added complication of having a Befristed Aufenhaltstitel so have a couple of years to get that German up to speed I guess before I can try the substitute thing anyway. All great to know to get a plan though.

 

cheers again guys

 

Anyone else have any experience with this - would be great to get more accounts.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am not C2, I am only C1 and it is not a problem, even for teaching things other than English as I know the vocabulary associated with my subject from reading about it in German. I make mistakes when I speak but the pupils can understand me, most of the time they don't say anything and just chuckle if the mistake is something really weird.

 

Here in NRW there are pages where you can sign up to get emails about available teaching jobs, there are 3 different systems, one for those that have all qualifications, etc., one for those that are coming in with other qualifications for an eventual permanent position (this can be for those that did not study teaching that have studied a needed subject or have long work experience for things like needed in schools like Berufskollege, but those will have to take classes for a period along with teaching) and for substitutes. I have found my teaching jobs through the substitute system. I have my own classes as I am substituting for a specific teacher that is away for the year (usually this is for parental leave or long-term illness) so I don't have to go class to class. The systems might be different elsewhere so you will have to research what is like where you want to be.

4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sandgroperin

 

My PGDipEd is from Monash and I live in BW. I was teaching at a bilingual Gymnasium for about two and half years but the best I could manage was a position as a "Vertragslehrer" (no holiday pay, fighting for a new contract at the end of each year). In my case, I had a lot of luck. The Principal was a very open minded fellow who recognised straight away that a well regarded bilingual school that had no native English speaker on staff would be seen as a bit of a joke. It wasn't easy though and he pretty much fudged his official statistics to keep me on board. From what I was told, I wouldn't have had much of a chance otherwise.

 

Sadly, he retired and the new guy came in and, although he also wanted to keep me on, he wasn't too sure about what he could and couldn't do, so he played it straight and I lost out. This coincided with the present oversupply of teachers in BW and low number of vacancies, and as the no German Ausbildung having contract teacher I didn't have a leg to stand on.

 

As others have said, it varies from state to state and some states are in great need of people. Even the disastrous student teachers who had parents marching on the school managed to find jobs in other states pretty easily!

4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey Tokeshu thanks for your info. I'm doing mine through Deakin, nearly went Monash though, it was a tough call in the end. I was thinking down the lines of a bilingual state school.

 

Quick question are you or were you sponsored by your Principal or do you have an EU passport or right to work of some description. I have the added complication of needing to be sponsored for the next couple of years.

 

I heard in the Eastern states they are screaming out for teachers. Anyone have any experience with this?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

ooo thanks for the extra info PLS I have a Masters of Accounting and am qualified to teach business courses at Community College back home maybe I may get onto this Berufskollege thingy.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Sandgroperin

 

My PGDipEd is from Monash and I live in BW. I was teaching at a bilingual Gymnasium for about two and half years but the best I could manage was a position as a "Vertragslehrer" (no holiday pay, fighting for a new contract at the end of each year). In my case, I had a lot of luck. The Principal was a very open minded fellow who recognised straight away that a well regarded bilingual school that had no native English speaker on staff would be seen as a bit of a joke. It wasn't easy though and he pretty much fudged his official statistics to keep me on board. From what I was told, I wouldn't have had much of a chance otherwise.

 

Sadly, he retired and the new guy came in and, although he also wanted to keep me on, he wasn't too sure about what he could and couldn't do, so he played it straight and I lost out. This coincided with the present oversupply of teachers in BW and low number of vacancies, and as the no German Ausbildung having contract teacher I didn't have a leg to stand on.

 

As others have said, it varies from state to state and some states are in great need of people. Even the disastrous student teachers who had parents marching on the school managed to find jobs in other states pretty easily!

 

Yeah, the German schools are more open to take those with foreign qualifications than the district governments are. I would have a look around at the different Länder programs of what they accept and don't before studying a long time back at home if what you really what to do is teach. Here in NRW there is special program for English native speakers to teach here if you have studied a language (doesn't have to be English or German as far as I understand).

 

The availability of jobs for foreign teachers depends on the need for teachers in an area. The South is bad for foreign teachers with foreign qualifications because they fill most of their positions down there. From what I have heard, NRW, former East Germany and the city-states are often the ones that are the most need of teachers. I didn't get paid over the summer at first because one contract ended at the end of the school year, I had only unemployment benefits (Arbeitslosengeld I). But I have been paid back that in the last couple of days because I had a job at the beginning of the new school year. Here you get paid over the summer holidays if you work the whole second semester (I was a week short of that because it took ages to get my contract sorted because I was moving over the district borders and supposedly, the old district was not sending on the information that they needed), otherwise you have to hope to get something where you start day 1 of the next school year and get paid it afterwards.

 

 

ooo thanks for the extra info PLS I have a Masters of Accounting and am qualified to teach business courses at Community College back home maybe I may get onto this Berufskollege thingy.

 

I would look into it. The more qualifications you have, the more likely to get something. Things vary great by the Land and there is even variation on the district level depending on the need for teachers.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Hey Tokeshu thanks for your info. I'm doing mine through Deakin, nearly went Monash though, it was a tough call in the end. I was thinking down the lines of a bilingual state school.

 

Quick question are you or were you sponsored by your Principal or do you have an EU passport or right to work of some description. I have the added complication of needing to be sponsored for the next couple of years.

 

I heard in the Eastern states they are screaming out for teachers. Anyone have any experience with this?

 

I forgot to answer this. I am married to a German, so I had the right to work through him when I started, since then I have become a German citizen so the district can only reject me if they think my qualifications are not good enough. You are employed by the district government when you work in schools here, so I would assume if you need a sponsor, they would have to be the ones that do that. I am not sure how that works out with non-EU passport holders.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Like PLS - I'm married to a German and thus am allowed to stay here and work. From my experiences with Monash, I think you're in a far far better place with Deakin! I have to say - I had to organise my own placements because a lot of the schools simply refused to have anything to do with the Monash education faculty.

 

I've also heard that teaching jobs are much more readily available in the East, but my wife is also from BW and has no desire to relocate within Germany.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Quick question are you or were you sponsored by your Principal or do you have an EU passport or right to work of some description. I have the added complication of needing to be sponsored for the next couple of years.

 

If you have a full-time contract and official certification, a work permit should not be a problem. If I were you I'd first worry about the certification.

 

 

I would have a look around at the different Länder programs of what they accept and don't before studying a long time back at home if what you really what to do is teach.

 

I couldn't agree more. Sandgroperin, if you want to teach in Germany, you need to decide whether or not you're willing to move. If you are committed to staying in BW, I really wouldn't bother with the teaching certificates. On the other hand if you're willing to move for a vacancy, you'll need to look into the exact requirements for the Länder with the greatest need for teachers.

 

Currently Berlin has a shortage of Math, Physics, IT, and Latin teachers and I hear that Thüringen is also desperately looking for teachers. What subjects are you qualified to teach?

 

 

my wife is also from BW and has no desire to relocate within Germany.

 

I'm willing to bet that your wife is not the only one and that many teachers who are originally from BW will not be willing to move where the jobs are. Supposedly BW hired many teachers from other Länder and I think it'll be difficult to predict how many of them have settled there and how many would be prepared to move again. Anyone willing to hazard a guess? :)

 

Regarding German, I know that an English and French teacher who was having his qualifications recognised here in Berlin about two years ago was required to write a C2 exam set by the Senatsverwaltung (he could have also opted for the GDS, however, the KDS was not have been good enough). As I said, it really varies by state and under certain circumstances it is even possible to apply for an exemption.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Have you looked at the BW education ministry's website? There you will find the infos on what their standards are for foreign teachers. Generally most Bundesländer want a II Staatsexam and Großes Deutsches Sprachdiplom (C2 exam) for perm. positions, but in NRW you can start as a "Seiteneinsteiger" with ~C1 level German- they were interested in hiring native-speakers through the "Teacher Acquisition Programme", but scrapped the program since they have too many Referendaren at the moment... could have a look here https://www.schulministerium.nrw.de/BP/LeoAngebote

Generally, you would have to re-qualify, but as a "Seiteneinsteiger" you would be doing your qualifications with the "Referendaren" as well as teaching. If they would give you a spot in a one-year "Lehramtbefähigung" or a spot in a two-year programme to do a II Staatsexam depends on how many hours you have studied in specific Fächer, or if you have a four-year Bachelor or Masters degree...

Don't worry if you aren't an EU-pass holder, I'm not either and I still got hired. The only difference is that you can't become a Beamter if you get your II Staatsexam, you can only be an Angestellte.

I'm pretty sure there is another thread dealing with this issue for RP/Hessen somewhere on TT...

 

But if you have a Masters in Accounting, I think there might be enough Math hours in there to qualify as a Math teacher- and man are they desparate for Math teachers here! (as well as chem, physics, latin...) and the Berufskollege are desparately searching for teachers as well...

2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the info Ape. Good to know that visas are not a major issue, just a hurdle.

 

I studied a bit of Finance with my Accounting degree not sure if that is enough to qualify as a Maths teacher but thanks for the heads up won't stop me from asking. Actually, I love Maths and would love to teach it.

 

My first degree is actually in English (too embarressed to originally say because of shit spelling and grammar I post off duty :blink: )and Politics so I think I have a few options open to me.

 

Definitely interested in the Berufskollege option too.

 

Looks like I gotta get that B2 German up to C1 standard and take it from there. Might be making a move to NRW too.

 

It's really good to know with a little will it is possible thanks again guys.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I inquired about this last year in Munich. I was told that I would have to get my transcripts evaluated at a university here (LMU), which I did. Despite being certified in four subjects in the US (German, English, English as a Second Language and Russian), having three master degrees and more than fifteen years of teaching experience, I was told that I would need to take university courses here, take the Staatsexamen and do a practicum. The whole process would take about three years.

 

I do not have an EU passport, but do have authorization to work. Apparently there is reciprocity among EU countries to recognize each other's teaching qualifications. It may be easier to get a teaching qualification from another EU country (UK?? Ireland??) and then have it recognized here. It's at least worth looking into.

3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A lot of it really does depend on the state, and B-W and Bayern are particularly tricky. (Actually, I've heard of cases where German teaching degrees from other states haven't been sufficient, depending on curriculum. And where B-W and Bayern graduates get employed in other states, whose graduates then get stuck. A teaching degree from Bremen is not terribly portable, I hear.)

 

Probably not a state you're planning to move to (while recognition's not that impossible here, there simply aren't that many jobs!), but Niedersachsen has some interesting info online to give you an idea of what's required.

 

See here for information on applying for jobs (you'd be a Quereinsteiger). To get a sample of available jobs, the Eis portal is interesting. For example, there are currently 13 vacant Maths jobs across all school types (though it's the wrong time to be looking.)

2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I found an online link where you can register your details and schools in Berlin can access the details and contact you if they are interested in your qualifications.

 

They seem to be looking for Quereinsteiger / Seiteinsteiger too.

 

http://www.berlin.de/sen/bildung/lehrer_werden/einstellungen/

 

https://www.senbjs.berlin.de/bildung/lehrer_werden/einstellungen/beovertretung/login.aspx

2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Thanks for the info Ape. Good to know that visas are not a major issue, just a hurdle.

 

I studied a bit of Finance with my Accounting degree not sure if that is enough to qualify as a Maths teacher but thanks for the heads up won't stop me from asking. Actually, I love Maths and would love to teach it.

 

My first degree is actually in English (too embarressed to originally say because of shit spelling and grammar I post off duty )and Politics so I think I have a few options open to me.

 

Definitely interested in the Berufskollege option too.

 

Looks like I gotta get that B2 German up to C1 standard and take it from there. Might be making a move to NRW too.

 

It's really good to know with a little will it is possible thanks again guys.

 

Well, if you studied English, you should be able to get through with something like "Teacher Acquisition Programme" here in NRW that ape suggested. I would agree B2 just isn't enough German, but C1 is fine for some programmes.

 

Politics doesn't seem to be in demand here in NRW. I have a BA and MA in politics and I have written a PhD thesis in politics, which I am awaiting approval, and I have only found things for teaching English (as native-speaker) and history (it was my second subject for my BA). I love history so I don't mind that, but you should be aware that there is not much out for politics here. I think there will be in 5-10 years because most of the ones I have met that teach that are a bit older, but that doesn't help in the meantime. If you can get in for Maths, you will find loads of positions here in NRW. That and the natural sciences seem to be the most lacking. Some Berufskollege offer English as well so you might be able to do Finance or Accounting with English at one of them.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am also currently trying to decide the best way into the state education system. I'm a UK University Graduate with a Bachelors in French and German and I have 18 months English and French teaching experience in a private school, as well as a TEFL certificate and two TKT (Cambridge University Teacher's Knowledge Test) certificates.

 

I've recently decided that I really want to work for the state, and in order to do this, I need to re-do my Bachelors degree (ie start English and the Pedagogic modules - maybe do some French modules that weren't covered in my first degree) and then go on to a Masters in Lehramt. My subjects would be English and French. I'm currently in Sachsen-Anhalt and would like to live here long term, however my subject combination will not work at the Universities in Magdeburg or Halle. Potsdam and HU Berlin are the next suggestions.

 

Both universities have offered to place me into a higher semester, but I'm wondering if there are any other ways, as I'd have to leave Sachsen-Anhalt and I'm not really keen to do that. (Commuting to Potsdam is an option for me.) I don't really want to repeat my bachelors for time and financial reasons, but it seems like this is necessary to work for a German state school.

 

My next question is, as a British citizen, would I be eligible for Beamte status? I don't think this is likely, but I have heard there are possibilities. I know that Berlin no longer awards Beamte status to fully-qualified teachers, whereas Brandenburg does.

 

I have C1 German and I plan to spend another year working before I start University.

 

Does anyone have any advice?

 

Thank you :)

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I sometimes deal with the recognition of subjects and degrees from other German universities, so I know a bit about that process. But I'm not sure what you'd like to know in that area. For what it's worth, that subject combination (English/French) is also possible in both Dresden and Leipzig, if that's more helpful, and the Dresden website says explicitly that you can do the "Vorbereitungsdienst" in another state. Saxony is currently reforming their degree structure again, so if you want to go there, waiting a year isn't the worst idea! (With those subjects, I'm assuming 'Gymnasium".)

 

(Incidentally, I just checked, and the Halle website actually says that subject combination is possible there - on this page - but you may have more up-to-date information.)

 

How much time and energy repeating your BA will be depends on the curriculum at your university of choice. Best case - you get all of your French subjects, you get a BA thesis recognised, you get exempted from the practical English courses, and you get some of your past teaching experience recognised for one of the compulsory Praktika. That leaves most of the English subjects, the teaching subjects specific to French, at least one Praktikum and any general teaching subjects (psychology etc).

 

Worst case, you only get half your degree in French accepted (often depends on how much linguistics you've done), and have to do everything else from scratch.

 

As for alternatives, the S-A website says pretty clearly "Die sogenannten Seiteneinsteigerprogramme werden nicht mehr angeboten". I don't know if you could start out in a neighbouring state and then transfer back over, but I think you'd still need a Masters at some point.

2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now