Best bike shop in Munich

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Hi I'm looking for recommendations on where to take my beloved mountainbike. I just got it shipped from the UK, it arrived with the box in great condition, all wrapped up, unfortunately when I went to put the wheel back on I noticed the frame had got bent somehow, the part where you attach the derailleur hanger has been bent slightly, but enough I can't get the wheel on. This is a decent bike (Cove Stiffee) so I really want to see if there is anyway I can salvage the frame, I'm wondering whether in can be gently coaxed back into being straight. So which is the best bike shop in Munich, where do you take your pride and joy and trust them to do stuff to the bike rather than just selling parts? Preferably one that knows about mountainbikes rather than all the city bikes that are so popular here.

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Guten Biken @ herrnstr.28 017629439822 good mechanics and solid work. I have not found a better place and been here nearly ten years.

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just to update went to Guten Biken and they did and great job of fixing my bike, quickly and cheaply :)

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Guten Bike is a good place. So is Lovebike, just around the corner.

 

That said-- aluminum is a bad material for re-bending. It loses a ton of strength (as opposed to older steel frames that can be re-set). If something aluminum gets so badly bent that the fix would requiring re-bending, you may have to start looking for another frame. I have heard of at least one person who had a frame re-bent and supported by the addition of titanium splints of a sort.

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A Cove stiffee 'ain't a bike which is built with cokecan alu, a slight bend would be no problem.

 

Alu of the kind that Cove uses would have none of the problems you are talking about, also I've broken enough super-light steel frames to know that fixing them 'ain't exactly a home run either.

 

Although I'm very impressed with the job Guten biken did on my Basso. :)

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It's not so much whether a minor bend is a problem with aluminum alloy bike tubes (no matter the tube diameter or material thickness)-- it's that you generally cannot bend aluminum alloy bike frames back into shape. Alu alloys don't have a fatigue limit (unlike steel). A steel bike can break, for sure, but you can generally cold-set a steel frame without weakening it.

 

A single, minor bend is fine... if you don't have to re-shape the part for the bike to work. But it's the re-bend that fractures the material. You might be able to get a really minor bend in the rear stay to accept the rear wheel again, and it might work. But it might also result in catastrophic failure (without warning) at some point.

 

In any case, I'd be inclined to trust the opinions of the Guten Bike guys either way. We can agree on that! And it's worth getting to know them anyway... you'll need 'em at some point.

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They know their stuff there, that's true.

 

I'm just saying I've had cracked alu frames re-welded and down-hilled on them no problem.

 

And I've had catastrophic failure on steel frames, so while I love the feel of steel frames and would ride nothing else, x-country or on the road, I'm alittle wary of proclaiming them to be safer.

 

just my experience mind, I don't know diddly about metal really. Anyways it sounds like the OP bent her rear-mech drop-out rather than the frame.

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No it was the frame, I don't think you would even bother trying to straighten the mech hanger, the whole point of them is to bend to save the frame? The guys at Guten Biken seemed to know what they were talking about, it was only a small bend and I'm happy with the finished job anyway :)

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Geck 'Oz bikes is really good, it's in Erding though (I don't know if that might be more or less useful for you, but anyway it's there). With reference to bending aluminium, the high quality alloys do have a fatigue limit, it is still in any case lower than steel. It is only unalloyed (or cheap alloys of) aluminium that don't - in which case if you could hit it with a feather for long enough it would break. I once had a 6061 aluminium rack which broke in half without warning or high load so now generally always stick to steel - and also because I'm about 110kg and with fully loaded panniers push the suggested weight limits :P

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