German flour

37 posts in this topic

I'm having a bit of baking trouble. can anyone help?

 

I've read all the information about ash content etc (too technical) and all the info on cooking sites such as nigella.com etc - btw there's a lot of 'e-hugging' going on there at the moment so I'm steering clear for the time being and sticking to good old TT tongue lashings :P

 

But back to the point.. My attempts at Yorkshire pudding, cheese sauce and cakes using 405 flour, the supposed equivalent to plain flour are turning out gluey and heavy..

 

Is there a lighter one or methods of baking with it I just don't know about? I don't want to have to give in and start ordering kilos of plain and self raising from Britstore to save my reputation as a cook!

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gluey and heavy

Donald Duck's lesser known Scottish nephews.

 

I'm sorry, it's an affliction

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Okay, I'll ask the obvious one and then leave it for more experienced voices to chime in.

 

Are you sifting the flour first?

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Are you using this brand? You can see a photo.

 

http://www.rosenmehl.de/outputFileData/143...tart_visual.jpg

 

Showen is right you really have to mix it first. Also, for sauces do you mix the flour up in a cup with a little bit of the milk etc before you add it to the rest of the sauce? this usually works. I usually use a cornflour for sauces though. Imported as a German equiv has not yet jumped out at me in the shop!

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I am sifting and sifting but it doesn't make any difference. could the water affect it as well? I've tried several different brands but not the Weiner Griessler.. will write that down.

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Sifting is one thing - but to get a really decent finish on a yorkshire pudding batter, or a bechamel based sauce like the cheese sauces you are making, you want to sieve the sauce itself after cooking. This will remove any lumps, and make the sauce smoother.

For yorkshire pud batter, sieve it, leave it 24 hours in the fridge, then whisk again. You'll get a really silky finish

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I'm a Rosenmehl 405 fan too, double sieving is a fine thing and as for Yorkshire Puddings I don't even bother as cb4ch (or however he spells it) makes the best one I have ever eaten and so there is no point in me competing there.

Wiener Griessler is the flour used for Strudel. It's very elastic and so with a baking agent will rise or stretch more so possibly worth a try if 405 isn't working for you. However, although it takes on liquid very evenly, you might have to mix for longer as the higher absorption takes time so don't panic when you use it.

For sauces, Instant-Mehl (from Rosenmehl amongst others) dissolves very quickly and might be just the thing (I use the 405 myself though).

Cooking for Engineers

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Cornflour is called "Spiesestärke" here. The stuff I found came in a rectangular box with a picture of a cake on the front; I think it was in the cake ingredients part of the supermarket. Hope that helps.

 

Gustin and Mondamin Speisestärke:

 

post-356-1131539863.jpg post-16-1170162300.gif

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pictures of cakes on everything don't really help do they? I'd have thought both those were icing sugar. you live and you learn.

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pictures of cakes on everything don't really help do they?

No.

It's the German obsession with making cakes for that bloody coffee and cake ritual that always involves some shitty in-laws that you really would prefer never to see ever again, unless perhaps it was down the barrel of a 12-Guage Mossberg.

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In my experience, the best way to get something similar to what we'd call "all-purpose flour" in the States is to mix 405 and 550. The difference between the two is that 550 has lots of gluten (for rising) and 405 has very little. All-purpose is somewhere in between. Try starting by replacing 1/4 of your 405 with 550 and increase bit by bit until you find a suitable mixture.

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If you want UK cornflour the Asian shop in Hauptbahnhof stocks it (at the back, in the wire rack, near the fridge, bottom shelf).

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I know this post is rather old, but I would really appreciate some help. I am having trouble getting my old baking receipes to turn out properly. In the USA, I made them with all-purpose flour, and everything was fine. I doubt anything else is amiss, as the other German items are fine. (I stock up on American vanilla extract bottles, when I am in the USA.)

 

I have tried both 405 and 550, and a mixes thereof (25-75, 50-50, 75-25) all to no avail. I had my sister bring me a 5 lbs. bad of all-purpose flour when she visited and the muffins turned out fine. So the problem is really the flour. Can anyone tell me the secret?

 

PS Would it be illegal to send vanilla extract or flour through the mail (USA to Germany)?

 

In case anyone cares, I have found the 70% Kakao chocolate bars to be a good substitute for baking chocolate. You can put them in the freezer for a while then wrap it in a dish drying towel and wack it with meat tenderizer to make chocolate chips for muffins, etc.

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Forget buying vanilla extract. Make your own. It's easy and will save you money. Just take a vanilla bean or two and store them in an airtight bottle submerged in vodka. Wait 6-8 weeks and done. My wife made two bottles and they're just about done.

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Pretty much what Crawlie provided (in the link) is right on the dot. I used type 550 flour for making breads and type 405 for making cakes or pastries. As for vanilla extract, I have never seen any of it around here. If you fly into the UK once a while, you can try to purchase a bottle of vanilla extract from Costco.

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You may find vanilla extract in a spices shop (Gewürzhaus), but not cheap, a small bottle cost me 9,95 €.

 

Flour Type 405 is the German all-purpose flour for cakes, cookies etc.

 

Type 550 is flour that makes the dough rise particularly well (yeast dough).

 

There's also Spätzlemehl if you want an "elastic" texture.

 

See also here

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http://www.toytowngermany.com/wiki/British_and_American_foods has lots of this kind of info, btw. Just added the King Arthur Flour Comparison Chart linked above.

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