Stupid names for children

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My maiden name was David - which precluded my mother naming my brother David (David Davis however, is a famous producer).

I knew a girl once calles Mavis Davis, I thought she was taking the mickey when we first met and I laughed at the name, them I found out (after a long period of " ah, go on tell us yer real name") that it was, in fact her real name, she was not impressed, but we became good friends in the end.

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If you are interested in what is "in a name" then check out Freakonomics. The last chapter called "A Roshanda by any other name" is about the research that Roland Fryer did with birth records to track socioeconomic status and naming tendencies. They used birth records covering more than sixteen million births, including standard items such as name, gender, race, birth weight and the parents' marital status as well as more telling factors about the parents: their zip code (which was used as one indicator of socioeconomic status and a neighborhood's racial composition), their means of paying the hospital bill (again, an economic indicator) and their level of education.

 

From this they identified the most common high-income white girls names, the most common medium-income names and the most common low-income names.

 

The most common low income white girl names (they had 20, I will just list the top five. you can get the full list on page 191 of Freakonomics were:

 

1. Ashley

2. Jessica

3. Amanda

4. Samantha

5. Brittany

 

of course there are discernible patter to the movements of popular naming and these things can change.

 

But the research and findings(which is much more in depth) are fascinating.

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Luckily I've never even heard of another person with my first name although I'm sure there must be some. That ought to skew the statistics. What does having a unique name say about socioeconomic status?

 

My entire family tends to opt for strange names, see the aforementioned: Orenda, Aurelia and Rhapsody siblings.

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The most common low income white girl names (they had 20, I will just list the top five. you can get the full list on page 191 of Freakonomics were:

 

1. Ashley

2. Jessica

3. Amanda

4. Samantha

5. Brittany

is that the PC way of saying white trash? :D

 

funny, when i read those names, i automatically think white, then snob or a wannabe snob. it's just the association.

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The most common low income white girl names (they had 20, I will just list the top five. you can get the full list on page 191 of Freakonomics were:(...)

It all refers to the United States, I suppose?

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Orenda, Aureliea

Bah, those names were just nicked from Midsummer Nights Dream surely, or they are just names nicked off a packet of Radish seeds or something.

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I am just glad that Dana Scully was a truly cool character and fabulously intelligent. :P

 

@Kay,

 

yes, 16 million American birth records.

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I am just glad that Dana Scully was a truly cool character and fabulously intelligent

Whereas most people were a bit gutted that some decent totty was not cast in the role..

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What does having a unique name say about socioeconomic status?

They discuss that in the book to and you will be glad to know that it indicated high-income and educational status ;)

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Whereas most people were a bit gutted that some decent totty was not cast in the role..

yes, I know..they wanted a "decent totty" and asked me but I turned them down ;)

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My son Zak Starfucker has drug and behavioural issues but I don't think it derives from what we named him.

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They discuss that in the book to and you will be glad to know that it indicated high-income and educational status

Good to know, now when is that high-income going to kick in? :P

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Worth a mention again is the excellent notwithoutmyhandbag.com where some of these dumbfuck kids names are listed. Some very funny stuff in there and ample evidence that the ability to procreate really shouldn't be freely available to the masses.

 

 

I really like the name Giovanni for a girl but it means John in english. We have not decided on a middle name yet but are thinking about Page (my grandmother's maiden name), Sun (which means cheerful and calm), or Rose (which my husband really likes).

The boy name that we have chosen is Dawson Alexander. What do you all think?

 

And another A+ for multicultural research. I just did a web search for "Giovanni baby name girl" and immediately got the feminine versions: Gianina and Giovanna.

 

Meanwhile, I think it's time to say a few words about gushing about a name's "meaning." Some meanings originate because the name evolved from real word (usually in a foreign language). And so their meanings are somewhat interesting.

 

And then some names have arbitrary meanings that for all I can tell were pulled out of a dead monkey's ass. For example, check out my good buddies the Kabalarians, who have insightful (cough) "meanings" for classy names like Beer and Toilet. I love the Kabalarians, because every one of their name analyses reads even more vague and general than the astrology listings in the newspaper.

 

And then some names don't have secret "meanings" because they are (dum dum DUM!) ALREADY WORDS. Sure, it'd be one hell of an irony if the name Sun meant "ugly fat pockmarked bastard," but I think it's a fair guess in English it means ... um ... wait, give me a second ... oh yeah, "sun." As in the giant ball of warmth and light that makes life possible for trees and flowers and baby bunnies and such.

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Bah, those names were just nicked from Midsummer Nights Dream surely, or they are just names nicked off a packet of Radish seeds or something.

I figure the names were picked to assure the kids wouldn't be able integrate with the "commoners". The whole family is whacked like that.

 

Either that or it amuses them to see their kids get beat up in the schoolyard.

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But lets not forget the top 5 names for southern boys

 

1. Billy-Ray

2. Bobby-Ray

3. Johnny-Ray

4. Jay-Ray

5. Ray-Ray

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my mum used to avoid answering questions about my name when I was in the pram and would start talking about the weather. REGINALD ain't that bad!

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@ DarkKnight: You forgot Bubba Ray!

 

In fact, as a three year old, I liked the name Ray so much that I told my mother "I am a boy and my name is Ray". My real middle name is French and sounds way too Savannah French decended socialite :rolleyes: ...thanks to my Savannah grandmother who loved the name so much that she wanted to name her poodle with it but upon getting a second granddaughter thought she had and even better opportunity to pin the name on a poor kid--(no I will not tell my real middle name)

 

Roland Fryer --the young, black Harvard economist who conducted the above mentioned research because he was curious about the post 1970's self-imposed segregation of his fellow black Americans (his words not mine or Steven Levitt’s), was on a radio show taking calls about his findings. An upset woman called identifying herself as African American and venting that she was upset about the name just given to her baby niece. It was pronounced like shuh-Teed but was in fact spelled “Shithead”. There were also twin boys (Fryer points out in his interview that these boys were also black) whose parents further dignified their choice of naming their boys OrangeJello and LemonJello by instituting the pronunciations as a-RON-zhello and le-MON-zhello.

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