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When to give up on job prospect

41 posts in this topic

 

I'd say a polite note after the interview thanking them for their time, stating you had a positive experience and think they would be a good fit for you, blah blah, is about right (it's good practice to show your appreciation even if you got a negative answer at the time). Then the ball is in their court. Pestering is more likely to hinder than help.

Erm!!!

 

 

I wrote what I thought was a fairly decent email and waited for a reply. I didn't get anything for a week so I sent a short mail just asking if it was received. No reply again, so after 2 attempts at calling and leaving messages shall I call it quits?
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At the moment a lot of companies are talking to lots of people and taking their pick, so you need to allow them time to do that. If they are interviewing 6 people for 1 position and you were first, it could be some time - at their risk of you finding something else (which will depend on the current job market in your field). When short of staff, they will often offer a job on the spot to the first good candidate and forget the rest, because of that pressure from other potential employers.

 

I'd say a polite note after the interview thanking them for their time, stating you had a positive experience and think they would be a good fit for you, blah blah, is about right (it's good practice to show your appreciation even if you got a negative answer at the time). Then the ball is in their court. Pestering is more likely to hinder than help.

 

Another reason to be left in the dark is that their answer is "not now" - they've found a better candidate but would like to keep you in reserve or for potential future vacancies.

 

did you even read the OP? or did you just decide to post after reading that he never heard from them after the interview? seriously.

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i can completely empathize with the OP..my wife had similar experiences here on her job search...

all will look +ve, and finally you hear nothing even after multiple follow ups...

 

if it is a NO, better to inform than to keep them waiting and causing anxiety.

 

Been on that road and clearly know how it feels.

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Sorry to ask probably an obvious question, but have you looked on LinkedIn to see if you know anyone who might be connected to someone at the company who could get inside information? A former colleaque contacted me this past week and I knew the hiring manager.

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The person who interviewed me is on linkedin and twitter and facebook etc... however I have not found any connections. Like the idea of a bit of 'inside information', makes job hunting a bit more exciting.

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did you even read the OP? or did you just decide to post after reading that he never heard from them after the interview? seriously.

 

I offered two potential explanations of the 3-week wait. What's your problem with that?

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I offered two potential explanations of the 3-week wait. What's your problem with that?

 

both explanations and everything you said is great, it just does not apply to OP's problem.

 

He did not apply for an open position, which invalidates the whole idea about interviewing others.

 

and yo tldhim to send a nice note after the interview saying thank you and all that crap, OP already was asked by the interviewer to send an email, which he did, he then sent a follow up message and contacted the interviewer's secretary.

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Shitty that mate, but from everything you're put in this thread I think it's a safe bet that they aren't interested in you, for whatever reason. And like somebody else said, given how unprofessional they've been in their (lack of) communication then you're better off not working for them anyway.

 

It took me over ten months of applying for jobs to finally get one, and I'd say I got a response to my applications approximately half of the time, so it's unfortunately not rare. Finally got a job after going for interview, in German, being rejected, writing back saying I had a good feeling and if they have anything else (tbh I was pretty desperate for work) they could see me doing I'd love to hear back from them. Had an email a day later from the main manager to say would I be interested in some translations, and that led to me being made full time within a month and now I have been in the job I originally applied for for a year.

 

Fingers crossed your luck changes soon, all the best.

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He did not apply for an open position, which invalidates the whole idea about interviewing others

Depends if they are inundated with speculative applications, doesn't it?

 

Being speculative opens another possibility - whoever interviewed him wants him, but hasn't got budget approved. During which time making any kind of offer would be a stupid thing for the hiring manager to do.

 

Still, the longer it gets the less likely and I don't think there is anything the OP can do now to influence the outcome.

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Both my husband and I have had very similar experiences (and we're in two totally different fields). He is also a native German speaker, so I don't think it was a language issue either. He applied for an advertised job and went through a series of e-mails and phone interviews and then was told the company was very interested in him and then silence for two months. He e-mailed, he called, he told them he would be in Germany in the summer and sent the dates, and eventually he gave up. Then they e-mailed him and asked for an in-person interview the day after we were scheduled to leave Germany. We chalked it up to a lack of professionalism in their HR dept.

 

Then I had a few similar experiences, although most of my applications are unsolicited. I found that a lot of times I was asked to interview "tomorrow," or I engaged in a few e-mail exchanges, but then met with silence. I also had an in-person interview in which the person asked if I would be available to come in for another meeting, but then after I sent my follow-up e-mail to thank him for his time, silence. I'm not sure if it's a German thing, or an HR thing or what, but it's been very frustrating for me for sure. I would always prefer a sincere "no thanks" over silence. Trying my very best not to be rude, I have written an e-mail asking if my other e-mails were received and requesting confirmation. That actually got me a positive answer once and I ended up getting that job. I'm not sure if that always comes off as polite, though.

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Key decision makers (ie the boss) go on holiday, or have meetings. Things get delayed. Budgets get changed, things come up.

 

At the end of the day, you dont know for sure until you get told. I have had jobs go cold for months and then back to life. I have also seen people apply, interview and been offered and even start a job within 72 hours.

 

Work, like everything else is a bit of a game :)

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I appreciate that people go on holidays zwiebelfisch, and that the reality of working is pretty stressful so things get pushed to the side. But to me that is blantantly unprofessional and rude, to not reply to emails or phone calls. The only consolation I have, is that when I am someday in the other position, that I will treat people with more respect, as I know how it feels to be messed around. And unfortunately it seems from the responses on this post that quite a lot of other people know how it feels.

But you are right, it's all a bit of a game and perhaps good to think of it like that.

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They were window shopping but not ready to buy. After all you came to them, maybe you intrigued them so they were interested in talking to you but they really can't justify hiring you. Yes they should have contacted you, if nothing else so as not to burn a bridge. In my world it so often happens that the person asking you for something today later moves somewhere else and becomes the one you have to go to for something that you want a year later. So we're very careful about things like that.

 

Or it could just be the enormous social ineptitude of Germans, not knowing how to say no or to wind down a situation nicely.

 

I'll throw in another 2 cents on emails. No don't use info@. Even if you use freemail try yourname@ some local email provider that ends in .de. Like gmx. Don't ask me why (cos I'll just call it their seige/bunker mentality) but somehow to Germans that's more legit than hotmail.com or yahoo.co.uk. You could also resort to, wait for it, sending them a letter in the post. Its very unlikely for that not to get delivered.

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I guess all of them were small companies.

 

But few companies the same way, are you doing something to piss the interviewers off perhaps unknowingly?

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I know it's a frustrating process, especially in Germany where it takes so long. Just keep on applying and interview everywhere until you actually land a job.

 

I would give up on that job.

 

Good luck!

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Interpreting the thread's title in another way ... after 12 months of more general silence in my search for meaningful employment, I've decided to do my masters degree instead. Problem solved!

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I also think they were window shopping and couldn´t hire you. Sorry, it sounds exhausting to have to wait for them to answer, I know the feeling very well.

 

Anyway my suggestion is: do not think about it. Move on. If they want you they will contact you and then you will see if you want to work for them (maybe they have a good reason for not being in touch, waiting for budget approval or so).

 

You never know what´s happening in the HR department, there are so many factors that can influence a decision - you/your CV need to be at the right place at the right time, and be very lucky.

 

Best of luck, but enjoy spring and avoid thinking about it!

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Yep good advice livializ. Right now i'm more concerned with what flavour ice cream to buy. The weather today is to good to worry about trivial things like careers, money, future prospects etc...(those are Mon morning thoughts!)

 

Hope you are all enjoying the weather too.

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The only consolation I have, is that when I am someday in the other position, that I will treat people with more respect, as I know how it feels to be messed around.

 

We al know how it feels, we have al been there, myself included. However when you are on the other side, as I also have been, you will find that it is often out of your hands, and that the potential employees also mess you about to a similar degree.

 

Im not saying any of this is good or right, just that it is as it is.

 

I do however think not replying at all is unacceptable, though reasonably common.

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