Suffering from Gout?

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  1. 1. Do you suffer from gout?

    • Unfortunately Yes
    • Fortunately No
    • What the hell is gout!

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16 posts in this topic

After reading that i'm not the only one who suffers from gout here on TT (Tap+Poppet)how many others suffer aswell and what tips can we give each other,i don't drink beer anymore(i adored the stuff)have now switched to cider,no Marmite,no baked beans and no more steak and KIDNEY pies,i drink a lot of water and also take non chemical drops from Denmark(have not had an attack since i took them,touch wood)taking tablets(purinol) every day is not my answer to the problem,so anybody out there got any good tips?

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I have a tip, but be warned, it is not for the queasy.

 

Collect some of your own urine and rub it on the site of the gout. My wife had gout many years ago, and this really helped.

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Not got it yet, but my dad has it - and at my last checkup, the only thing that was out of the ordinary was my uric acid level. Thanks Dad... :blink:

So if you don't mind, I'll just read along and hope someone has good tips on how to avoid getting gout.

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Yesterday, my foot became very red, hot and swollen, so last night, I wrapped it in a cloth smeared with quark, a good old German remedy for such things. I left it on all night and this morning, the swelling and reddness are gone, for now, and it's less sore.

 

Later on today, I'll go to a chemist and get something called "Balance" as I'm told this (as the name indicates) balances the acid in the body.

 

I'll report back and let you know how I'm getting on.

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After reading that i'm not the only one who suffers from gout here on TT (Tap+Poppet)how many others suffer aswell and what tips can we give each other,i don't drink beer anymore(i adored the stuff)have now switched to cider,no Marmite,no baked beans and no more steak and KIDNEY pies,i drink a lot of water and also take non chemical drops from Denmark(have not had an attack since i took them,touch wood)taking tablets(purinol) every day is not my answer to the problem,so anybody out there got any good tips?

 

Yup, I try very hard not to overdo the alcohol, take allupurinol 300 (1-0-0) daily and IBU 600 (1-0-1) while an attack lasts. I would love to hear more about the non chemical danish drops. Do tell.

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My dad swears by his daily bowl of cherries. He's not much of a drinker but discovered that gout could be brought on by fish (according to his Dr.) -- in his case the otherwise extremely healthy Alaska King Salmon. Go figure.

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My dad discovered that gout could be brought on by fish (according to his Dr.) -- in his case the otherwise extremely healthy Alaska King Salmon. Go figure.

 

Oh yes - this quote from Gaberlunzi's above link.

 

 

Foods considered high in purine content include:

 

Some fish, seafood and shellfish, including anchovies, sardines, mackerel, scallops, herring, mussels, codfish, trout, and haddock

Some meats such as bacon, turkey, veal, venison, liver, beef kidney, brain, and sweetbreads

Alcoholic beverages

 

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Funny how often TT peeps are sharing the same thoughts. Reading about Tap’s and poppet’s trials on the unhappy thread reminded me to listen to the previous week’s Inside Health programme as I’d an idea the promo’d mentioned gout. I thought I’d listen to it, gather a few links, and start a thread when I’d finally got some sleep. (Insomnia had me awake from Saturday – Tuesday) I’d never had gout so you can imagine my *ExF?&%§$5pletetive deleted* reaction on being woken by excrutiating pain in both big toes just 3 hours later. Struggling to distract myself I refreshed TT and was suitably distracted by finding bobbylines had already done the needful. Good man, bobby!

 

Right enough the Feb 7th“Inside Health discovers that gout - a condition associated with older portly men caricatured in cartoons and literature - is on the increase and striking much younger. And while it has been the butt of many a joke, it has never been a laughing matter - at least for those afflicted.”

 

You can listen to it here for the middle 10 minutes or, for those who prefer to read than listen, this’s the bit from the transcript:

 

 

Now, onto a condition that is closely linked to nutrition - gout, and new evidence suggesting that it is on the increase. Over indulgence - particularly a high protein diet and excessive alcohol - can lead to a build-up of uric acid in the body, with serious consequences for those prone to gout. But despite the stereotypical image, gout is not just an issue in older, portly men with ruddy complexions. And while it has been the butt of many a joke, it has never been a laughing matter - at least for those afflicted - as journalist Michael Bywater discovered.

 

Bywater: If you look up gout on google you'll find a million and a half cartoons, they range from the vast bandaged toe on the footstool, blackened devils nipping at your extremities, there are knives, there are needles, there are pitchforks, there's fire and brimstone in your joints and it's all blazing horribly and that's the gout. As Falstaff said: "A pox upon this gout!" Erasmus had it. Dr Johnson had it. The Medicis had it. Luther probably had it. And it wasn't just religion, it wasn't just learning and dictionary writing and the accumulation of wealth - it was literature too. Fictionally - Sir Lester Deadlock in Dickens' Bleak House had it. It was the family malady and he was weirdly proud that in some way it confirmed his place in society, even in his gnawing agony. "Ooooh."

 

Nuki: There are so many great cartoons, so many pictures of this stereotypical image of gout. It's become a problem because this actually inhibits patients.

 

Porter: George Nuki is Emeritus Professor of Rheumatology at Edinburgh University.

 

Nuki: People who hear that somebody is suddenly absolutely crippled by this excruciating pain in the big toe is funny to a lot of people but not at all funny to the person concerned. And there is beginning to be some evidence that that actually is one of the reasons why patients have difficulty sometimes in coming to terms with gout and actually doing the modifications of lifestyle and adhering to the advice of doctors in terms of drug treatment that are necessary to actually kill the disease because this is the one severe chronic rheumatic disease that can be completely cured. And unfortunately the evidence at the moment suggests that it's increasing in frequency and that it's not being adequately managed.

 

Porter: There are at least half a million people with gout in the UK - most of whom are middle aged or elderly men - but there is concern that, as well as becoming more common, it now seems to be striking much earlier. And that may be related to expanding waistlines. Mara Macadams Demarco from John Hopkins University in Boston is one of the researchers who first identified the worrying trend.

 

Demarco: Throughout the US and the UK, as well as worldwide, the rates of obesity are increasing at alarming rates and one of the consequences we didn't realise previously about the increasing rates of obesity is that it's associated with bad outcomes such as the development of gout. And in particular we're finding that gout is occurring at an earlier age due to obesity. And we found that on average participants developed gout 11 years earlier if they were obese in early adulthood and about three years earlier if they were obese in middle age.

 

Porter: Mara, how would you explain gout?

 

Demarco: Well gout is an inflammatory arthritis, it basically occurs when there is a build-up of a substance called uric acid in your blood and basically this causes an inflammation of the joint, so your joint becomes hot and tender and red, it's incredibly painful and if you think of growing rock candy as a kid with the sugar that kind of crystallisation is what's occurring in the joint and that's why it's such a painful and debilitating disease.

 

Nuki: Very often they get a premonition that it's going to come on, they feel they're a little bit thirsty, something like that, and then it very rapidly develops. So that's a very characteristic thing about this particular kind of arthritis, that within a matter of hours a joint that's been absolutely normal beforehand becomes really, really painful, inflamed, swollen, red, sometimes the inflammation's so severe that the skin over the surface of it starts peeling.

 

Porter: And it's pretty painful.

 

Nuki: It's extremely painful. It's said to be one of the most painful things.

 

Porter: And although obesity increases the likelihood of developing gout, slimmer people can get it too.

 

Shelly: My name's Shelly and I've suffered with gout in the past. I'm only five foot tall, I was under nine stone, I was actually only 38 years old. I woke up one morning just after Boxing Day with a terrific pain in my left big toe. My toe was just bright red and shiny and killed - absolutely killed. So not realising what I'd done I thought perhaps I'd kicked my husband in the middle of the night, which is quite funny, and he took me up to our local hospital, they said to me have you drank much over the Christmas period and I said, well no I don't drink much anyway, I'm a lightweight where drink is concerned. They said to me you've got gout. And I didn't, at the time, know really what gout was. And they just gave me some anti-inflammatories and said go home and rest it and take the medication. And when I came out of the hospital I rang my mum up because she was looking after my three children at the time and I said to her about it and she laughed. I said, well what's funny in this? And she said well there's an old wives story that only old men that drink port have gout.

 

Porter: Not so, as Shelley discovered to her cost. And in recent years there has been a growing appreciation that there may be more to gout than painful joints.

 

Nuki: There is some debate as to whether just having raised levels of uric acid in your blood may be an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease, for strokes and for heart attacks and so forth. So if one has an attack of gout or indeed if a doctor does a blood test and finds that you have a high serum uric acid level what's very important is that should be like a red flag for the doctor to look for other risk factors for cardiovascular disease.

For more information on treating acute gout, and what you, and your doctor, can do to lower uric acid levels and prevent attacks there are some useful recommendations on these websites.

 

http://www.patient.c...health/Gout.htm

 

http://www.patient.c...-Acute-Gout.htm

 

http://www.patient.c...Prophylaxis.htm

 

http://www.ukgoutsociety.org/ Recommend you click on the Resources button and download the 3 PDFs.

 

 

2B

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I know that gout is not funny, but it was to a couple of teenagers back in the day when we were walking down the school corridor and Mr S came out of his classroom and started along in front of us lifting one of his legs out to the side with every step in an arc-shaped motion. Tee hee. Well, it wasn't just this, but the fact that Mr S, as a staunch socialist and proud member of the working classes, had gout.

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Welcome to the club :( It's over twelve years since I first got the damn thing; got a list of foods that "could" cause gout and, by trial and error, managed to narrow down the ones that would cause some pain and those that would cripple me. Unfortunately it's not consistent across all people, something that gives me gout might not cause you to get it and vise versa so this is a rough guide.

 

Beer is not a problem and spirits only if I drink enough to be paralytic. Fish is not a problem, high fat cheeses (over 45%) can be hit or miss, though they only cause my feet to ache next day. Chicken skin (not the meat) can bring on aching feet if I eat it more than twice a week. My absolute nightmare food is string beans, one mouthful of those bastards and I cannot walk the next day.

 

The advice about cherries seems to be a good one, they certainly help me and appear to help anyone else I know who has gout. The simplest treatment of all is to drink plenty of water, my doctor recommended that I drink 1-2 litres of water per day; I've been doing that for over four years now and have not had a crippling attack in that time.

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Have had it for 20+ years. I take Allopurinol 300 and have not had an attack for years. I do not eat certain things, when I remember, but overall I lead a pretty normal life.

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Yup, I try very hard not to overdo the alcohol, take allupurinol 300 (1-0-0) daily and IBU 600 (1-0-1) while an attack lasts. I would love to hear more about the non chemical danish drops. Do tell.

 

I don't know for sure if it's the drops(see link) or the fact that i have changed my diet and drink lots of water or that the drops have helped all i know is that (touch wood)it has not come back for 2 years hope it can help and let us know the results

http://molyb-plus.com/product.asp?product=13&lang=de

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I know this seems like a no-brainer but you'd be surprised to learn that I've had several prospective clients or their friends/loved ones try to book a massage with me because of intense pain from gout.

 

Do.Not.Get.A.Massage when you're having acute gout inflammation. This is nothing like edema swelling where certain types of massage can help.

 

You know how the sugar at the bottom of an empty, unwashed coffee cup recrystallizes? Imagine slicing open your foot and shoving those granules into the wound and sewing the wound back up. Welcome to a gout inflammation. Then imagine me immediately squeezing and kneading that area grinding those little shards of sugar-glass deeper into the meat of your foot. Doesn't sound even remotely relaxing or helpful on any level, does it?

 

Just don't do it. Massage of the affected area will only make things worse during this time.

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