The coffee thread

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OK I did a search, and didn't find anything. I actually just have a quick question: how bad do coffee beans go? Just found a huge container from the US of Trader Joe's Volcano beans that expired 2 1/2 years ago. This is great, kick-ass coffee..

 

Which brings me to the broader point: I cannot stand this limp-wristed, flaccid, barely-if-at-all-caffeinated burnt-tasting German coffee. I need a fucking kick in the morning, and NO German coffee has a kick. I'm sick of buying fancy "select bean" blends from German super markets, only to brew a pot, taste it, and realize after three seconds that nothing is going to happen, and that I just wasted the time and effort again on German coffee.. I have bought some Starbucks beans recently, and they are good - but expensive - about twice store-bought stuff. Is that the only alternative in Germany?

 

I was drinkig the Dalmayer's blue stuff, which is less awful than most of the others, but even that is pussy-ass wuss-water..

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How do you make your coffee? I found what I think is the best method a couple years ago, using a filter with a holder, then dripping just boiled (filtered) water straight in to a cup with some warmed milk.

As for the coffee, the best compromise between price and flavour that i've found so far is Netto's 'Mocca', it's the usual foil vacuum packed stuff, but it's well roasted, has a darker colour than anything that's comparable, and tastes pretty good.

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I used to make coffee like that as a student - with just the plastic bit out of a coffee machine on top of a huge mug.. Now we just have a normal coffee pot. I also have a French press, which I recently tried. But coffee from those things always tastes a bit dusty or mealy or something. I actually ground and brewed some of this Volcano stuff, and am drinking some right now.. Pow!!

 

I guess I'll try this Netto Mocca stuff. But if it sucks I'll be sure to let you know about it.. (ha ha..)

 

Also, to any Americans out there. I asked my sister to send me some more TJ's Volcano beans, but she said they don't sell it anymore. What out of the US is similar that I can have her send?

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You might wanna try coffee beans. Might be more expensive but certainly worth the taste and you know what's actually in the ground coffee.

http://www.ndr.de/fernsehen/sendungen/markt/recht_verbraucher/kaffee189.html According to this, companies tamper with the coffee by adding caramel and maltodextrine :angry:

Switched to beans only years ago and haven't regretted it once. Except maybe financially. :lol:

http://www.berliner-kaffeeroesterei.de/shop/index.php?cPath=79_164 Buy some, roast them yourselves according to your taste. Should be even cheaper than the Starbucks stuff.

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My day starts with a Lavazza Black quadruple espresso and two slices of Marmite on brown toast. If in Japan I hunt out the Segafredo at the main stations, if in Italy I am in heaven, and if in the USA I bring my own Twinings Earl Grey and avoid suffering The Best Damn Hot Brown Water in The World, or that paint stripper Starfucks claim is actual espresso.

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Coffee is disgusting,long live Tea :)

 

Seriously though on this subject judging from the Americans I know I have always assumed that American coffee is always drunk less stronger than German coffee as the ones I know always cut down the amount of powder or beans in a pot compared to the Germans

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Decent, strong coffee on a budget works like this in my household:

 

I buy these beans

 

post-40039-13250636148089.jpg

 

grind them in this cool, compact grinder

 

and cook it on the stove in one of these

 

post-40039-13250637702777.jpg

 

Good, strong coffee with a full nutty flavor, wenig säure when brewed correctly, satisfied every time. I get the beans at Kaufland, initially began buying them because the package was the prettiest, but kept buying them over the years because they are the best beans for the price that I've found in any supermarket. Every once in a while I treat myself to beans from an independent roaster but given the amount of coffee I drink, I can't be shelling out that kind of money every couple of weeks.

 

Not for the weak of stomach, though! A friend of mine gets the shits when she drinks coffee at my place, but I think that's because I make it way stronger than most casual drinkers would take it...

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I used to use a stove top percolator like the one you mention until I realised it was just burning the coffee, hence the overbearingly bitter, acrid taste of the coffee it produces.

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Yeah, that's what I mean though by doing it "correctly"--the water wants to get hot enough to brew the coffee but not so hot as to scald it, and you want to take the percolator off the heat way before it stops sputtering. If you put it on, then leave the room, and come back to take it off when it's nice and silent, that means it's been sitting there boiling for a couple of minutes--hence the burnt, bitter coffee. Mine works very well provided I stay pretty close to it and/or can hear it when it starts to sputter. As soon as it starts sputtering you can take it off; whatever's in the bottom is really of no use to you anyway.

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I used to make coffee like that as a student - with just the plastic bit out of a coffee machine on top of a huge mug.. Now we just have a normal coffee pot. I also have a French press, which I recently tried. But coffee from those things always tastes a bit dusty or mealy or something. I actually ground and brewed some of this Volcano stuff, and am drinking some right now.. Pow!!I guess I'll try this Netto Mocca stuff. But if it sucks I'll be sure to let you know about it.. (ha ha..) Also, to any Americans out there. I asked my sister to send me some more TJ's Volcano beans, but she said they don't sell it anymore. What out of the US is similar that I can have her send?

 

Search the interwebs for Kaffee Rösterei in your area. Nürnberg has a small shop that roasts their own coffee almost daily. Fresh coffee makes all the difference. When I'm too lazy to make it to the shop to buy fresh roasted, I buy Illy dark roast, whole bean coffee at the Marktkauf. It's not too bad. Also, I brew it with one of these things, which is as close as you can get to espresso short of buying a good espresso maker.

 

 

I used to use a stove top percolator like the one you mention until I realised it was just burning the coffee, hence the overbearingly bitter, acrid taste of the coffee it produces.

 

A mocha pot is really not any different than an espresso machine. The stove boils the water until the pressure gets high enough in the lower chamber to push the water up to the top of the coffee grounds. It's hard to burn coffee when you're talking about temperatures of less than 110°C. Perhaps you're just choosing the wrong coffee if it's bitter. The espresso blend I've used with my mocha pot makes a nice, slightly acidic cup of joe!

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Arabica is more acid and has less caffein than robusta. Additionally, if you buy mild-roasted beans, it gives less the so-called "body" taste. Expresso is mainly dark-roasted. So there are a number of things one should know to get the right coffee for one's taste.

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Yeah, that's what I mean though by doing it "correctly"

 

If you think about what is happening inside the percolator, the amount of time you leave it on the heat is irrelevant, the coffee is having vaporised water (steam) forced through it, for water to turn in to steam, it has to reach 100° Celsius, that is why coffee made with a percolator will always be scalded, regardless..

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and cook it on the stove in one of these

 

post-40039-13250637702777.jpg

 

Everytime we go on vacation, I wonder how you use that thing. I had no idea you would put it on the stove. I assumed you filled it with hot water or something. We just bring our senseo with us. :ph34r:

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Germans misunderstand the meaning of "strong" IMO. I go to some company and they bring me some "strong" goupy coffee, that tears my stomach lining apart, but has NO KICK!! THAT to me is strong - the kick.. The flavor should be full, or mild, or whatever..

 

And for those of you saying American coffee is bad, stop basing your conclusions on what you are served in a gas station. The same applies to beer actually - there is very good stuff available, it's just not the mainstream stuff. There are EXCELLENT coffee shops and good coffee all over the US. Hell, even grocery-store Maxwell House everyday coffee is preferable to any coffee I've had in Germany.

 

Italian espressos and cappucinos are something different too. We have a Nespresso machine, which is good for that(yes, it is good..) But I get sick of frothy-milk espresso drinks and prefer to start the day with two big cups of power-coffee. That's what I'm after.. I don't like Caffe Creme either - just want a good strong cup of coffee.

 

Starbucks daily brew coffee is actually pretty good. What I want is about that, but at home. To all the haters, go buy a simple tall house-brew coffee. It'll wake you up and have a decent flavor, unlike anything else you can find here - or at least that I've found..

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Search the interwebs for Kaffee Rösterei in your area. Nürnberg has a small shop that roasts their own coffee almost daily. Fresh coffee makes all the difference. When I'm too lazy to make it to the shop to buy fresh roasted, I buy Illy dark roast, whole bean coffee at the Marktkauf. It's not too bad. Also, I brew it with one of these things, which is as close as you can get to espresso short of buying a good espresso maker.

 

A mocha pot is really not any different than an espresso machine. The stove boils the water until the pressure gets high enough in the lower chamber to push the water up to the top of the coffee grounds. It's hard to burn coffee when you're talking about temperatures of less than 110°C. Perhaps you're just choosing the wrong coffee if it's bitter. The espresso blend I've used with my mocha pot makes a nice, slightly acidic cup of joe!

 

There is a place here - called Ganos. It's where all the German coffee snobs buy their beans. I've been there over the years and tried some different kinds - all the same - NO KICK!!(my frustration having tried their stuff is what drove me to buy a Nespresso machine..) German coffee just lacks caffeine, period.

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Try looking at the wikipedia on the coffee preparation page under "grinding". The amount you grind your beans is crucial to the result. Like sex with or without the canoe.

 

edit- i have an automatic one, beans are in , water is in , push the button. They have dials to customize grind and amount which i configured with trial and error. I drink tons of coffee.

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German coffee just lacks caffeine, period.

 

Have you ever thought that you might have a caffeine intake problem?

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If you think about what is happening inside the percolator, the amount of time you leave it on the heat is irrelevant, the coffee is having vaporised water (steam) forced through it, for water to turn in to steam, it has to reach 100° Celsius, that is why coffee made with a percolator will always be scalded, regardless..

 

Some coffees are better when brewed at 100°C and others are better brewed at lower temperatures. It depends on which coffee you choose and the grind. And, if the coffee is packed, higher pressure is required to force the hot water through it, which allows even hotter water. As a general rule, lighter roasted beans require lower brew temperatures, and darker roasted beans require higher brew temperatures.

 

 

There is a place here - called Ganos. It's where all the German coffee snobs buy their beans. I've been there over the years and tried some different kinds - all the same - NO KICK!!(my frustration having tried their stuff is what drove me to buy a Nespresso machine..) German coffee just lacks caffeine, period.

 

Just after you post about haters bagging on American beer, you bag on German coffee. When people bag on American coffee, they bag on the typical, truck stop, drip, Folgers or Maxwell House that you find in any restaurant or office. There are plenty of good coffees here, you just have to suffer through some bad ones to find them. Don't you think there are plenty of Budweiser-drinking Americans who think that micro-brew drinkers are American beer snobs.

When I need a bigger cup, I grind the beans more coarsely, and use a coffee press. I get two, large cups of strong coffee with a little sludge at the bottom of the second.

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With a 20-month old at home and irregular working hours, I do suffer from lack of sleep..

 

When I go home to the States though, I generally have two normal cups in the morning, and one in the afternoon, and that's fine.. No quadruple espressos or anything..

 

Also, in the morning it needs to be quick.. No dicking around.., which some of these other contraptions require more of than a normal coffee pot..

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