Losing the run of yourself

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Couldn't find an appropriate topic to attach this to (but don't have a lot of time to search hard so please merge if there's somewhere it fits in). My boss asked me yesterday if there's an equivalent expression in English for "lass die Kirche im Dorf" and I couldn't think of anything, even with the help of the internet, apart from "don't get carried away" or "keep it simple". Then last night at about one o'clock (why was I even still awake at 1!), "let's not lose the run of ourselves" occurred to me. My question is, is this a particularly Irish expression, and if I pass it on to a German, they'll get laughed at by non-Irish native English speakers? A quick google mostly leads to Irish websites.

 

Thanks.

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I've never heard the expression. I suppose "Let's not carried away here" might be the American English version, at least what I would say.

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Never seen it anywhere but in contemporary Irish lit. Not sure if I've ever heard any of my Irish friends actually use it, even. Great little expression, though.

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Not sure if I've ever heard any of my Irish friends actually use it, even.

Maybe you only have friends who know how to keep themselves under control :D

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Let sleeping dogs lie? (That's British English) I rather liked the one from john though.

 

Merry Christmas everybody out there!!

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Don't make a mountain out of a molehill -

 

http://www.linguee.de/englisch-deutsch/uebersetzung/mountain+out+of+a+molehill.html

 

2nd or 3rd down...

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Don´t get your knickers in a twist! A bit Coronation Street-ish but anyway...

 

I thought of that too, but it didn't quite fit for the purposes of what I needed. Someone was looking for a way to say stop making things so complicated, rather than the "calm down, calm down" aspect. :)

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Maybe you only have friends who know how to keep themselves under control

 

Nah, none of my Irish friends care if they're under control.

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Don´t make a mountain out of a molehill (less Coronation Street-ish! ) :D

Edit: whoops...didn´t see Rob´s comment. So, something out of the 70´s! Keep your neck wound in!

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Edit: whoops...didn´t see Rob´s comment.

That's ok, it just means I'm ahead in the translation scoring.

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Have to admit when I saw the thread title, my first reaction was 'oh, oh, fellow tter is losing their sh*t and giving up on personal hygiene and the like'. I definitely have not heard this one before in Canada (or elsewhere for that matter). Unless I am particularly thick tonight, I don't think too many people could infer the meaning either...(well at least out of context).

 

Liked John's contribution though (even if not exactly what you are looking for), the north american equivalent is 'don't get your panties in a bunch' (again not exactly what you are looking for).

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I've only used "a mad figary" as going with some crazy idea.

 

She took a mad figary and shaved her head.

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Yes I've heard it in Ireland alot and particularly in the last few years with reference to the bankers, builders and buddies. I like the Scottish "Get a grip".

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"Get a grip" is used in the USA too. "Don't get your knickers in a twist" is translated stateside as "Don't get your panties in a wad".

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"Don't bake the Pie for so long that it becomes burnt and you have to throw it out with the dishwater; UNLESS you like burnt Pie"

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