Montessori and Alternative Education Systems

5 posts in this topic

I would like to talk to someone with experience of sending their children to a Montessori school - related threads seem quite dated.

 

My children are bi-lingual (British Dad, German Mum) and going through the normal German school system. They are both bright, my son (6) one of those who seems to hit top scores without trying and his sister (8) a budding sports superstar :-) I am becoming increasing uncomfortable with the one dimensional learn-test-learn-test approach of the German system and am looking for a more holistic approach that allows them to develop in their natural directions albeit still with excellence at its core.

 

Montessori seems to support this goal but I would also be interested to hear other ideas. We live in Unterhaching area.

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Ho Grombomble,

 

I was looking for exactly the same. I do not know if you managed to get some info and if you'd be kind enough to share it. My kids are 5 (twins) and entering school next term. So we are a bit anxious about them joining the German school system for the same reasons you pointed out in your post. They both have been attending the German kindergarten for the last 3 years, so German is not a problem.

 

Thanks in advance

Regards

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Hi, we're also considering Montessori for our daughter. Has anybody heard anything about the school in Neubiberg? We went to their open day and we liked what we saw, but we would love to hear some parents' opinions

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When I read about Montessori education for the first time (I had just become a parent for the first time) I thought: "what nonsense" and stopped reading any further after maybe the first 20 pages. Only one or two years later somebody made me continue reading. The more I read the less it seemed to be all nonsense. When my daughter was 3 I wondered whether or not to send her to a kindergarten (it didn't really seem necesssary as there were enough kids out on the street to play with) and in the end I convinced my wife to send her to a Montessori Kindergarten (even if it was almost 30 km away). She liked it and a year later her brother joined her. After kindergarten they went to a Montessori school. While this was a very good thing for my son I am not so sure about my daughter. In grade one she was traumatized by my wives death and I think that the Montessori system gave her too much room to retract into her daydreaming (she had basically retracted into her own visionary world as a result of that trauma) when it might have been better to challenge her more and force her to focus on participating in class.

 

So based on my experience I think while it is probably the best system for most kids it may not be the best for everyone. When my daughter was in grade 4 it became obvious that she needed to go to a remedial school. Since the principle of a state remedial school advised me not to send her to one of the state schools (since there were too many children from difficult backgrounds and the atmosphere this created was not condusive to making a shy and hypersensitive child like my daughter feel comfortable) and since I wouldn't have been able to afford a private remedial school in Germany we moved to South Africa where it was affordable. So while my daughter got back on track in a private remedial school my son was going to a South African Montessori school and blossomed there. He had no command of English, but the Montessori system (and some private language tuition) helped him to smooth in easily and he loved it there.

 

So, I am convinced that especially when it comes to migrant children who don't speak the language of the host country the Montessori system really is excellent (barring extraordinary circumstances) because it offers much more interaction between kids than mainstream schools (as it requires the kids to help each other wrapping their minds around whatever task at hand) which results in learning the language and making friends much more easily. My son was fluent in English within less than one year and really enjoyed school.

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