Top 5 American MBA & Start-up Berlin: Salary

56 posts in this topic

 

I will stick with 80-hour weeks with six-weeks vacation, health care, company car

 

80 hours a week? That is probably illegal.

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80 hours a week? That is probably illegal.

 

Oops, that should have been 40! Of course, that's the official number, but there were weeks with close to 80, and weeks with close to 20 real hours of work. On a fixed salary, nobody's counting the hours anyway. You work as long as necessary to get the work done. If that means leaving at 2, or staying until 10 at night, that's just the nature of the beast.

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70k is a joke

Of course it's a joke but that is what he said. Germans only care if you have a degree (although I do not know why work experience isn't at least as important). For that kind of money, I will stick with my 40 hr a week + OT money and no work on weekends.

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@springstreet...also keep in mind the salary history you will be creating. When you take a below market paycheck for this job, you'll have to explain that rate to your next employer. Likewise, you lose leverage as your staring base for negotiations will be lower. Saying you worked for a Berlin startup may sound exciting to you, but a U.S. company may discount that experience as being irrelevant compared to your U.S. classmates who have U.S. experience. You pay for your thrills.

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What catjones wrote, plus remember that if you want to work in Berlin in future, with some US experience and a US salary behind you, you'll be in a better position to negotiate a reasonable salary.

 

You haven't really mentioned whether international experience is very important to the kind of career you want to have. Unless it's crucial, I'd be wary of a Berlin start-up with an unsatisfactory salary.

 

Love the "bad boyfriend" analogy, by the way.

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Springstreet, go get the salary you deserve. Forget about loving the team and all that crap, you need to set the bar right. International experience is not as important as salary level, because the first salary will be the basis upon which all your future increments will be set. If it's upper management, they should be willing to shell out minimum 100k, or else don't bother. In an increasingly globalised world our competitors for a job are from all over the world, so most of them have international experience anyway. Consequently for a firm it matters less and less to have a colourful work experience, what matters most is that the lady could do the job and people like her (networking).

Also, why focus your job search on Europe and US only? If you are single, apply all over the world. Upper management pay in Singapore is very generous, for example. Apply everywhere and pick the one with the best pay.

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True..i agree totally ..get the job where it pays the most..make use of your hard earned degree and leverage on it..

Singapore could be your interest point since the upper management pay is very good and tax rates are very less..

Good luck with all decisions that you make..

Cheers

Rad

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please dont undersell yourself.

 

i did that in my first job and once all the excitement like interesting team and company profile faded away (after 6 months), the salary part started to bother me every day.

 

I had to live with that for few years before I moved to a better job which payed more than double.

 

On the other side, your current salary has no influence on your future salary. At least in Germany, prospective employers will not ask to show your current pay slip. You ask what you want.

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At least in Germany, prospective employers will not ask to show your current pay slip.

 

Really? If not, then only for the last few years. I've been freelance for a while, but when applying for permanent positions, I regularly got asked what I was currently earning. (I don't actually think they're allowed to, but it's very hard to refuse to answer if they do ask).

 

I do agree on the underselling yourself statements and that once the novelty wears off, you'll be spitting. The one exception I would make to this, and it isn't clear to me if this is the case, is if OP's major goal is to make a leap to Germany. Then I would be willing to accept lower with a view to establishing myself in Berlin and moving on to a better-paid job. If however the main goal is a career-leap, then no. But it may then also be possible the OP would have to go to a different city to get a better salary.

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Singapore has its plus and minus points too, as many people who have worked there will tell you.

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Many of the comments were comparing different cities or even countries. When that is the case, my first two obvious questions would be 1.)What is the take home pay? and 2.)What is the cost of living in given country+city? Subtracting 2 from 1 can then even things up in the comparison.

 

100,000€ might be great in some U.S. areas, but not necessarily comparable in tax central Europe!

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Reading this thread I really must say that you have the wrong conception about working here:

 

You calculate your salary in advance based on your US perspective: Here, nobody cares what type of MBA you have or where it is from. Its next to worthless. Period. In Germany you will find, that it is perfectly alright if you have a diploma /Ph.D. from a decent university. Your Forbes lists (TOP 5 of US MBA) is also complete waste of time. Quite frankly, with your foreign qualification you are not in the position to negotiate anything here. :blink:

 

So you work in a start-up? Having helped to found more than five companies in Germany I have to say that they work entirely different than you say the have to. Nobody here cares to give away equity to staff members. Companies here are founded to stay, not the be sold or IPOed a few years down the line. So your equity share would be good for a few hundred Euros of pocket money every year. You are after the big buck in the wrong place. Miscontrued.

 

Salary: In a start-up in Berlin, be happy with a salary for your qualification level (maybe decent theoretical knowledge through MBA, but no practical track-record whatsoever) between 40 and 60k. Anything else is wishful thinking. Sorry to sound harsh, but this thread needs some frank words.

 

If you are in debt and need to pay back student loan, look for an industry job in Munich or stay in the US. Start-Up, Berlin and MBA are three things that collide with your financial burdens.

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Anything else is wishful thinking. Sorry to sound harsh, but this thread needs some frank words.

Word.

 

100k for a start-up? Itll go bust within 6 months.

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I am about to finish my masters in engineering from TU Berlin. I have spoken to recruitment people from several big tech companies and the average salary for a masters graduate seems to be around €55K in regions like NRW, BW and Bavaria. In and around Berlin the average pay is about €45K. One of my friend graduated last year from ESMT, Berlin. He had 5 yrs of prior experience and he got a job in Frankfurt with an IT company for about €65K. One thing is for sure, MBA's don't get preferential treatment and an MBA is treated on par with a German diplom or a masters degree! So no matter where you have your MBA from, asking €100K seems a bit far-fetched in Germany!

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This is an aside, but I'm an American studying public policy and I'm looking to communicate with people who came to Berlin to work in the software industry (startups or established companies). This could be a short survey sent via email or, for anyone who is willing, an actual interview. I'd happily share the results of my research. Thanks.

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