Music studies over 30

15 posts in this topic

o.k. This question might be terribly naive but here we go... :blink:

would u go and study music at age 32 ( meaning full academic studies ), considering the fact that I'll be through at around 37 and that this town seems to be full of unemployed artists... - just to be clear i'm a sound engineer and an experienced musician but without any formal training, and a non EU citizen living here now on an artist visa, and seriously considering my future - as in making a professional retraining.

Do you know anyone who puled such an act through? Or maybe from your own experience?

Honest opinions are welcomed,

Thanks.

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What exactly do you wish to do with the training? You are a sound engineer AND an experienced musician already so why not use that? seems like you certainly have an advantage over those younger unemployed artists... :)

 

But at the end, you should do what feels right to you.

 

PS: I think you need contacts more than a formal training for a jumpstart, if that's what your end goal is.

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למה לא?

A guy at my university was forty-five years old when he finished off his bachelors.

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LIAB makes a great point. You're never too old to further your education. And 37 is not at all old for a music industry professional, a lot of DJs and MCs don't make a real name for themselves until their 40s anyway. Tons of examples of this. Probably a good idea to keep working in the field while you're doing it, if it's possible. Go for it! Plus you will make great contacts in school too. Best of luck!

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what kind of training do you mean? Classical? Jazz? reading "full academic studies" makes me think you're interested in more 'serious' music studies..

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Thanks for your tips people, willowhands to your question - Jazz.

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well, that's less "hopeless" than classical. :) There is a lot of age-discrimination in getting a classical-music education - at least in Berlin - and where I work (one of the Musikhochschulen), you'd be considered "too old"... (not that I would recommend not doing it; I just wanted to prepare you for all the "you're too old" you'd be hearing)

 

that said, if you can already play, I'd suggest skipping the formal education and just going for it. Take private lessons to fix whatever needs fixing, and just get out there and start playing.

 

Play for friends, play for free, perform wherever and whenever you can. Take every opportunity that comes your way, meet people, get yourself out there. As mentioned above: it's all about who you know, and being in the right place at the right time. and talent of course. :)

 

willow

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"I just wanted to prepare you for all the "you're too old" you'd be hearing"

Yup, that was my experience, having the temerity to enroll at uni here when I was over thirty; frequent comments such as "I'd never have thought someone your age would still be studying" and "You should really be teaching by now, not still studying". It could help to be aware that this attitude prevails in some quarters, but I wouldn't let it put you off if you want to do it either.

Good luck!

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Go for it. Live your dream. It really is one of the best things I have done for myself so far but(!) I wasn't looking for a full career in music afterwards. It was more to take a break and enrich what I knew for myself, plus my music teaching job. At mid-30's I took a year out of work to study classical music, building on what I had studied at uni and piano lessons throughout school. I found a couple of sources for some funding from going through every business card I had ever been given plus I applied for a scholarship on the basis that I would contribute to music locally upon my return. It was fun, tough and I learned a great deal and grew.

 

Of my fellow international students, many of them also found some sort of funding for between 1 - 3 years of study. Despite their far greater talent than mine, knowledge and experience, it was a tough return to life back home finding jobs in music. For most of them it took quite a while to get credibility and gigs either performing, conducting or teaching but they did it eventually and are still quite gradually building. Anyway, taking care financially with some reasonable sort of job to support yourself afterwards whilst you set up as a jazz musician is not quite abandoning everything but it will give you some peace whilst you study.

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I taught piano for fifteen years and can verify that taking up an instrument is most definitely harder for grown adults than it is for children. The expanding and growing brain and neural pathways make it far easier for children to acquire life long skills like being able to play an instrument. Just as in the same way for most people, learning a new language as an adult is far more work than the natural process of acquiring ones mother tongue. HOWEVER, you have playing experience already so all i would like to do is to say that i agree with Willowhands above, which i think rather hits the nail on the head. Another big plus for you is that you are obviously preparing to have the time for the necessary studies - and time is important. You do need to honestly evaluate though for yourself your own abilities, things like intellect, endurance, aptitude, application, etc, and not let the truthful appraisal of these important ingredients be smoke screened by a dream. Be realistic. But if you have the talent, the aptitude and the commitment, then go for it!

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Hmmm. I have a Master's in Music, Vocal Performance (I studied at two US universities.)

 

Klopfen, I'm assuming elzo79 already plays a suitable instrument well enough to get admitted to a music school. Programs don't normally accept majors who are beginners on an instrument (I've never heard of such a thing, anyway.)

 

To me, jazz seems like an odd course of music study in Europe, though I'm sure lots of people do it. Most music schools, while they may have a class or two specifically in jazz theory and history, and a jazz ensemble of some kind, are really geared more towards classical music studies. Even in the States, you need to go to a school like Berklee in Boston to get a good jazz education, so you'd really need to have a look at the program(s) you're considering to see if they offer enough of a jazz emphasis to suit your goals.

 

I'm sure you already know that most of the great jazz players got where they are through more informal study (i.e., gigging and working connections, besides the usual luck.) Not via formal university education.

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I'm referring to the JIB ( http://www.jazz-institut-berlin.de/ ), so it's most definitely a jazz school B)

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...would u go and study music at age 32 ( meaning full academic studies ), considering the fact that I'll be through at around 37 and that this town seems to be full of unemployed artists...

It means you will not build up any capital or pension in this normally productive period in life. Once you become a self-employed artist, you have to find new work each year. You require extra (expensive) insurances like occupational disability and you need to put money aside for pension. This is something you have to bear in mind. A relative of mine is an artist and he can only manage because his wife has a fulltime job.

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Yes, it's true we musicians do tend to live more comfortably with a more practical, if less artistic, family member.

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