12 utterly depressing facts about popular music

225 posts in this topic

I disagree, but it's pointless trying to get past your shoulder chip so I'm not going to bother trying.

8

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Chocky, you are just attention whoring on this thread. Get off... :lol:

5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Because at least DJ Ötzi is not widely known outside the cultural wastelands that are the German speaking parts of Europe.

 

"Cultural wastelands"? Really, Chocky? You post some of the most asinine shit I have ever seen. How you could honestly go on about how people should want to be intellectually stimulated and then post such ignorant drivel is beyond me. How about waking up and accepting the fact that people have differing tastes from yours and yours are in no way superior? Get over yourself.

9

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

I think "high culture" aims at and strives for something..., um.. higher, something more intellectual and weighty than what rock speaks to. Rock speaks to the lowest common denominator. High culture("classical music" in this case, whatever you want to call it..) enriches. ... Rock music speaks to depths IMO - and pretty much only to depths, and because it lacks completely intellectual content, it cannot be aspirational or meaningfully inspirational.

Fair enough. I understand where you are coming from, but I still have to disagree with this part here. There were plenty of artists during the 60's and 70's who were famous for their "intellectual" lyrics and music. Bob Dylan, Joan Baez, John Lennon and Arlo Guthrie for example, just to name a few. And then there were real musical geniuses like Eric Clapton, Eric Burdon, Paul McCartney and others, who - at least IMHO - are somewhat comparable to composers like Beethoven or Mozart. It's just different music written in a different era.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mozart's music was played in the streets in his time, and if he would live today he would be just a very succesful writer of pop music.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

"Cultural wastelands"? Really, Chocky? You post some of the most asinine shit I have ever seen.

 

Ah come on, it's not all asinine, I am capable of being serious occasionally. That's the problem with German culture, or lack of it, there's no middle ground, only low rent manufactured pop, or classical music. Fuck all in the way of experimentation, it's all about uniformity and doing things in an orderly fashion. I've said it before and i'll say it again, Germany is a monolithic culture and society.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

I disagree, but it's pointless trying to get past your shoulder chip so I'm not going to bother trying.

 

Chocky is a well balanced poster. He's got a chip on both shoulders.

7

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

and if he would live today

 

But unfortunately, he doesn't.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Interesting link here about music and the mind: http://www.cerebromente.org.br/n15/mente/musica.html

 

One funny part:

Bob Larson, a Christian minister and former rock musician, remembers that in the 70's teens would bring raw eggs to a rock concert and put them on the front of the stage. The eggs would be hard boiled by the music before the end of the concert and could be eaten. Dr. Earl W. Flosdorf and Dr. Leslie A. Chambers showed that proteins in a liquid medium were coagulated when subjected to piercing high-pitched sounds

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Classical music is for people that believe that they are of superior intellect (like HerrdinkBumps) or mental or both.

 

Strictly speaking, Beethoven was a Romantic composer, not a Classical one.

 

 

Mozart's music was played in the streets in his time,

 

But not 10 years after his time. With only one or two exceptions, up until the present day, the only music people listened to was new music. There were a few documented revivals of certain kinds of earlier music in the 19th century, like Mendelssohn's revival of Bach, and some opera, but until the spread of recorded music, everyone wanted to listen to current music, not older music.

 

But even now that we can listen to a lot of older music, we don't listen to all of it, just the important and popular figures. For the same reason, Mozart is still popular, and Led Zeppelin is still popular, but Rihanna probably won't be popular in 30 years, never mind 200.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

I shouldn't, but I'll give it a short go..

 

I think "high culture" aims at and strives for something..., um.. higher, something more intellectual and weighty than what rock speaks to. Rock speaks to the lowest common denominator. High culture("classical music" in this case, whatever you want to call it..) enriches.

 

First of all, half of my comments here have been tongue in cheek. I like to spar.. You can't go much more against the grain than to criticize the fucking 60's, especially the music..

 

Today I was driving around going to work, and sometimes if I feel like I need a lift, I throw in for ex. White Zombie (#1 and #8 are best..) and play it really loud. It's absolutely like a triple-espresso. Then I go work and it's all forgotten. Just like what's left of an espresso after it gives you its kick is pissed out..

 

When I think of the several times I've seen Beethoven's 9th Symphony conducted by Ricardo Chailly - who I often refer to btw as a "rock star conductor", my feeling is completely different. It's reverent - and lasting. You HAVE to see B's 9th live by a world-class conductor and orchestra and choir some day to know what I'm talking about. When you see something like that, it makes you think about what it means to be human, about the heights people are capable of reaching - or if not reaching, at least conceiving of. Rock music speaks to depths IMO - and pretty much only to depths, and because it lacks completely intellectual content, it cannot be aspirational or meaningfully inspirational.

 

It's like comparing Vienna to some Walmart/Home Depot sprawl shopping center/parking lot complex.. The latter serves a purpose - a far more mundane and... democratic one come to think of it.. But it's not of the same value in my book. Imagine standing in front of each, and saying to yourself "This is what mankind is capable of".

 

2/3 Agree. It's too facile to dismiss "rock" as completely inferior and lacking in intellectual content and musical greatness. I don't think it's fair to compare two genres directly. Music is the most abstract of arts, one that reveals the most of the artist. You can give many definitions to good music, I can listen to many different genres from many different points in time and appreciate their merits. But great music forms an emotional bond between you and the composer. No matter how "intellectual and weighty" the pursuit, great music bypasses all of this, and gives you a glimpse at another mind that no other form of art or communication can achieve.

 

Great music gives you goosebumps. I get goosebumps from the Brandenburg Concertos and NOFX's the Decline; from Chopin's Etudes and the Dark Side of the moon. I cannot listen to Comfortably Numb as played in Pulse when driving, it makes me high. No matter how depressed or angry I am, one listen to Benny Goodman's "Sing Sing Sing" will make me smile. I can almost see trees in a storm when listening to the fourth movement of Beethoven's 6th. And yes, I feel hopeful that a particular night will be a good night while listening to the black eyed peas.

 

Music is very, very powerful. The most mundane song can get under your skin and bring you to places you've never been before, just by being played at exactly the right time. It doesn't have to make sense. There are times for classical music, there are times for rihanna or however her name is spelt. I cannot fathom that time ever coming for me, but who knows.

 

Is there good and bad music? Sure. Bad music is made without original thought and emotion: you cannot connect to anything, because there is nothing there. Bad music does not just speak to the lowest common denominator, it is made for them. In that sense it is more intellectual than good music. Sometimes the emotions they try imprint are too low and raw, and it's done in an obvious, slipshod way. It's like when a person says: "My six y.o. could paint that" at a modern art gallery. Yes, they probably could, but they wouldn't be expressing as much as a good artist would. It would be empty. That is sadly the case with most music today. Don't know if I'm explaining myself well, but my simulation just finished so I should get back to work anyway.

 

Open your minds and listen, don't judge.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Mozart's music was played in the streets in his time, and if he would live today he would be just a very succesful writer of pop music.

 

That is simply not true. Mozart started out as a court musician and his music was consigned and performed in concerts put on for the rich by the rich. As was the music of most of his contemporaries. Do you think your average citizen could afford a piano?

 

Folk music was played in the streets and entertained the common man.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

 

 

 

I have taught and worked as a counsellor with German kids on language camps, the stuff they have on their iPods makes you want to vomit, literally; DJ Ötzi, Slipknot, Blink 182, Pink et al, drivelling mindless shite.

 

Out of interest, do you know what is on non-German children's iPods?

 

I can just imagine you going around asking the kids what they had on their iPods.

 

Or did you just ask each and every child to lend his/hers to you so that you could listen and literally puke?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

 

 

 

 

I think my main problem with that twat is that he wears a bandana.

 

It would have interested me had you given a little bit more thought to Allerhausen's comment. Allerhausen refuted your erroneous assessment of German culture.

 

Seriously, that is the only contribution you can make in response?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

 

 

At least I started a discussion that a few people want to contribute to, more than you ever do on here.

 

From the Oxford Dictionary: "Discussion"

 

 

 

the action or process of talking about something in order to reach a decision or to exchange ideas:

Childishness aside: If you are patting yourself on the back for starting a discussion, then I think you need to do something about your rhetoric during "discussions".

 

What is the point in being insulting and offensive to those that take part in the discussion you started?

 

Ok, so we have all read your posts, and we are aware of your opinion of your adopted country and its people, young and old. But using this "discussion" to further bash it, while patting yourself on the back at the same time, is just being silly.

 

Below a few snippets of what you call "discussing".

 

 

 

 

 

What the hell does that mean you Nazi.

 

 

 

The fact is, you are one of a very small handful of woefully ill-informed individuals who would say that Led Zep weren't influential.

 

 

 

Oh fucking christ.

 

 

 

If you're trying to enter in to a serious discussion about what constitutes artistic merit, fine, but if you just want to see what happens when you ask why Beethoven's 5th Symphony is superior to Get The Party Started by Pink for shits and giggles, then don't bother.

 

 

 

German popular music is complete shit, the UK may produce shit as well, but quality gear comes out of that country in equal measure. In this country, it is shit without exception.

 

 

 

Ah come on, it's not all asinine, I am capable of being serious occasionally. That's the problem with German culture, or lack of it, there's no middle ground, only low rent manufactured pop, or classical music. Fuck all in the way of experimentation, it's all about uniformity and doing things in an orderly fashion. I've said it before and i'll say it again, Germany is a monolithic culture and society.

 

 

5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Eleanor Rigby! Now that was a great song by a popular choral group in the 60s!! :)

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here's Mozfart at home with his family.

Yipes!!

If this pic doesn't give you the creeps then nothing will!!!

 

post-16951-13231962056932.jpg

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

What, for example, did the street musicians play?

 

 

 

In the second half of the 18th century, tastes began to change: many composers preferred a new Galant style, with "thinner texture, ... and clearly defined melody and bass" to the complexities of counterpoint.[10] Now a new custom arose, that gave birth to a new form of chamber music: the serenade. Patrons invited street musicians to play evening concerts below the balconies of their homes, for their friends and their lovers. Patrons and musicians commissioned composers to write suitable suites of dances and tunes, for groups of two to five or six players. These works were called serenades (sera=night), nocturnes, divertimenti, or cassations (from gasse=street).

Mozart wrote 13 serenades, several divertimenti for various combinations of instruments, and a couple of cassations.

 

I don't know if you could find any concrete documented proof that street buskers played Mozart opera arias in, say, Vienna in 1775, but it's not unlikely. Most of his operas were debuted in public theaters at the time, and not in private court performances. If I had to guess what from Mozart would have been played by street musicians the most, it would be opera arias, which could be played by a solo violin or other melody instrument.

2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now