Change of name by German in UK

23 posts in this topic

Hi everyone,

 

I know there are a few similar questions out there but none really answer my questions.

 

I am German and have a german passport but I have been living in the Uk for the past four years.

 

I would like to change my name and it seems to be really quite easy over here. As they say you "just have to start using your name" and perhaps need a deed poll and/or a statutory declaration to legally change their name on their passport or Id's. Will this actually be accepted at the german embassy and could this later on cause any problems should I ever do go back to germany?

 

I have heard that the old chancellor Willy Brandt was originally known under a different name, then went abroad and changed his name there...

 

Does anyone have experience here and can help me out?

 

I very much appreciate your help.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

you can pay to make it official by deed poll. I went to school with Elvis Aaron Presley and Eddie Cochran. They could as you say just have started using their new names but we would have still called them "twats" whatever

2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Why are you asking here? Ring up the German Embassy and ask them, they are the ones who should know.

 

According to Wikipedia, Germany will not recognise these name changes just so.

 

 

http://www.ukdps.co.uk/WhoCanApply.html

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

I have heard that the old chancellor Willy Brandt was originally known under a different name, then went abroad and changed his name there...

 

With a perfectly valid reason: The Nazis were out for his blood.

 

edit: type faster, guys, this needs moving.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

I have heard that the old chancellor Willy Brandt was originally known under a different name, then went abroad and changed his name there...

 

Yep, all he had to do was flee the country to avoid the nazis and wait for them to remove his citizenship, then come back after the war. Piece of piss...

 

Seriously though, I know someone who looked into this and as far as I remmeber you can do whatever you like in the UK but the German authorities won't recognise the change - about the best you can manage will be a UK driving licence, credit card, etc. Try explaining (eg when hiring a car) why the names on your licence and passport don't match...

2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

... I am German ... I would like to change my name and it seems to be really quite easy over here ... Will this actually be accepted at the german embassy and could this later on cause any problems should I ever do go back to germany? ...

 

Germany was a signatory to the "Übereinkommen über die Änderung von Namen und Vornamen" of 4 September 1958 (the Istanbuler Übereinkommen) together with Belgium, France, Luxembourg, The Netherlands, Switzerland and Turkey. In later years, Austria, Italy, Spain, Suriname and Portugal also became signatories. Any name change carried out according to the law of any of the signatory countries will automatically be recognised by all the other signatory countries.

You will notice that the UK was not a signatory. There may have been later amendments to this Übereinkommen, but sadly the UK was never involved.

The result of this is that any name change you make in the UK may very well not be recognised when you return home.

 

(In 1982, after I had married Mrs AB in Dresden and whisked her off to the UK, she - a citizen of the old DDR - quickly became also a naturalised British citizen, to which the old DDR had no objection at all. Shortly afterwards we made a minor change to our joint surname by deed poll in the UK and the DDR Consulate in London exchanged Mrs AB's DDR passport for a new one in her new name. Then came the Wende. Mrs AB then applied for and received a new BRD passport issued by the German Embassy in London, this document reflecting Mrs AB's no longer so very new new surname. So far so good. Then we decided to move to Dresden... Upon arrival, the Meldeamt in Dresden refused to recognise Mrs AB's surname, despite that she still possessed and produced in evidence our DDR marriage certificate, our UK Deed Poll certificate(?), her DDR passport and her BRD passport. We petitioned the Bundestag who referred us to the Landestag in Sachsen, who in turn refused to recognise the name change citing the 1958 Übereinkommen to which the UK was not a signatory.)

4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Simple trick: Wait one more year, apply for British citizenship, anglicise your name (or whatever it is you want to do) and use your British passport in Germany. Particularly handy, if you are evading the bailiff in Germany...

 

Why the Willy Brandt/Herbert Frahm reference? Is the "Zwickauer Zelle" after you?

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No, it is not for any illegal reasons - in this or any other country :P i just have a rather peculiar surname, nothing too bad but I do aaalways have to spell it and I also wanted to add my grandmothers name as a sort of Middle Name, just thought it would be quite nice... I can imagine that this will most likely cause drama if I do ever go back home, all these rules and regislations... I have tried calling the Embassy and have sent emails but have heard nothing back so far... I just thought that if i can manage it that they accept my change of name over here at the embassy when applying for a new passport, that they'll just do the same over there, buuut of course not... tsts

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

... I just thought that if i can manage it that they accept my change of name over here at the embassy when applying for a new passport, that they'll just do the same over there, buuut of course not... tsts

 

In Mrs AB's case, the response to her petition included the assertion that the DDR Consulate in London had "failed to notify the authorities in Dresden of the name-change" when issuing her with a new passport, while the BRD Embassy had "made a mistake" when going along with her name-change at the time they issued her BRD passport.

No apology. No further discussion. The possession of a passport - or even two passports - is no evidence of there having been any acceptance of the name-change. Live with it and move on. Barstewards!

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Interesting bit of history there Mr AB. Thanks for telling.

 

Germans are really strict about their names. My husband has a double first name and officially it is with a hyphen - he only found out some years ago. They get very antsy if you do not put one in.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We added an additional middle name to our son's name within the first year as you are allowed to under UK law. Its shown on the birth certificate. His UK passport reflects that. German consulate in London would not accept that when issuing a German passport.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Germany was a signatory to the "Übereinkommen über die Änderung von Namen und Vornamen" of 4 September 1958 (the Istanbuler Übereinkommen) together with Belgium, France, Luxembourg, The Netherlands, Switzerland and Turkey.

 

 

Just a couple of things I have heard about names (changing).

 

Holland:

I heard this story on the radio. The woman in question rang in to talk about it:

An Irish couple living in Holland got married in Ireland. They both decided to take her name as she was last in line. When they went back to Holland the authorities refused to recognise her name and insisted on their using his name. There was absolutely nothing they could do to sway them.

This was about 10 years ago. It surprised me as I would have thought that Dutch law was fairly reasonable.

 

France:

A French pal had a child out of wedlock (excuse the old-fashioned term!!!). The father's (German) name was on the birth certificate. The child had the mother's name.

 

When she registered the child in France, they refused to accept the mother's name. My friend tried and tried to get the French authorities to change this - nothing doing. She moved back to France some years ago (the child was about 10). She was still fighting for the name recognition. She had a problem registering the child in school.

 

How must it feel when authorities refuse to recognise your legitimate name?

 

Ridiculous.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

... An Irish couple living in Holland got married in Ireland. They both decided to take her name as she was last in line. When they went back to Holland the authorities refused to recognise her name and insisted on their using his name. There was absolutely nothing they could do to sway them.

This was about 10 years ago. It surprised me as I would have thought that Dutch law was fairly reasonable ...

 

This story is a bit odd, because as I said in an earlier post, The Netherlands was a signatory to the 1958 "Übereinkommen über die Änderung von Namen und Vornamen", meaning that there should have been no problem for that couple when they arrived from Ireland. But, having never lived in Holland, what do I know?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good day

 

I am hoping that someone on this forum can assist me. I am a German citizen through my mother who was born in Cologne, Germany. I had a German passport but when I was much younger (14) I was legally adopted by my stepfather and I changed my first names because of valid reasons (for me) at the time. Germany does not recognise my change of first name and requires I submit an application to have this recognised. I live in South Africa and my local consulate has not dealt with a case exactly like mine before and therefore has not been able to assist much. I cannot change my name back to what it was as have subsequently travelled on visas, had children, registered with tax, etc. 

I have searched online but not had luck with regards to who in Cologne to submit the application to and what I must submit with the application form (i.e. what certified documents along with my motivation letter)? Please, if anyone has any advice regarding how to deal with this from South Africa and a contact detail in Cologne or elsewhere, I would be so grateful. I need to go through Cologne, apparently, as my mother was born there and therefore the descent is from that district. 

 

Thank you and Kind Regards 

Jenny 

 

 

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You seem to have your hopes up, but even though you changed your first name(s) in South Africa for reasons that were valid to you at the time, Germany operates a very strict rule on not altering names on passports, so if you are planning to get a new one it will inevitably be with the first names it was originally issued. 

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 hours ago, john_b said:

You seem to have your hopes up, but even though you changed your first name(s) in South Africa for reasons that were valid to you at the time, Germany operates a very strict rule on not altering names on passports, so if you are planning to get a new one it will inevitably be with the first names it was originally issued. 

Thanks for your reply. I was unaware of this being an issue at the time. There is some process regarding requesting Germany recognises this change but I am clueless with regards to how to send this form into and who to? I probably won't succeed but given that the change back would involve other countries I have lived and obtained visas for, the process to change back may be insanely long... 

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There is no process for changing a first name because you didn't like it.

The only reason would be if the first name was insulting, see here: https://tinyurl.com/y4mn8a3j

and here: https://www.stadt-koeln.de/service/produkt/aenderung-des-vor-oder-familiennamens-1

 

Not much hope, but the application form to get them changed can be found here: https://formular-server.de/Koeln_FS/findform?shortname=02-F08_NamensAend&formtecid=3&areashortname=koeln_html

 

Their e-mail address is: namensaenderung@stadt-koeln.de

 

The application form has to be sent to: https://www.stadt-koeln.de/service/adressen/standesamtaufsicht-namensangelegenheiten

 

Standesamt Köln

Haus Neuerburg

Gülichplatz 1-3 
50667 Köln 

 

***************************************

 

Anyway, the consulate is being disingenuous, they are the single point of contact for all German bureaucracy for people who live within its area of responsibility.

If they don't know something, it's their responsibility to find out about it.

5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
25 minutes ago, PandaMunich said:

There is no process for changing a first name because you didn't like it.

The only reason would be if the first name was insulting, see here: https://tinyurl.com/y4mn8a3j

and here: https://www.stadt-koeln.de/service/produkt/aenderung-des-vor-oder-familiennamens-1

 

Not much hope, but the application form to get them changed can be found here: https://formular-server.de/Koeln_FS/findform?shortname=02-F08_NamensAend&formtecid=3&areashortname=koeln_html

 

Their e-mail address is: namensaenderung@stadt-koeln.de

 

The application form has to be sent to: https://www.stadt-koeln.de/service/adressen/standesamtaufsicht-namensangelegenheiten

 

Standesamt Köln

Haus Neuerburg

Gülichplatz 1-3 
50667 Köln 

 

***************************************

 

Anyway, the consulate is being disingenuous, they are the single point of contact for all German bureaucracy for people who live within its area of responsibility.

If they don't know something, it's their responsibility to find out about it.

You have been a great help - thank you so much. I did not change my name due to not liking it. My father was a criminal and I was legally adopted. He had caused me a great deal of embarrassment and pain and I was worried to be linked to him (now that I am older, I realise that people will not judge me by my father's actions, but while I was at school, I spent my life panicking that people would link me to him). I realise Germany probably still won't recognise this but have to at least try. I would change my names back to the original names (even in 3rd world South Africa where everything takes forever and a day) but do not even have a vague idea how I would change this under the visa I lived in Australia under... 

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, JennyBolt said:

I realise Germany probably still won't recognise this but have to at least try. I would change my names back to the original names (even in 3rd world South Africa where everything takes forever and a day) but do not even have a vague idea how I would change this under the visa I lived in Australia under... 

 

If you now live in South Africa, why are worrying about Australia? Why do you even need to change your name in Germany? Do you have more than one citizenship? Or just the German?

 

 

 

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
53 minutes ago, engelchen said:

 

If you now live in South Africa, why are worrying about Australia? Why do you even need to change your name in Germany? Do you have more than one citizenship? Or just the German?

 

 

 

I have no choice but to have my living in Australia acknowledged. I was there on a visa and needed to submit proof to the German Consulate that I did not apply for citizenship there. So if my name changes back to the original, I will have to get Australia to recognise my being there and not applying for citizenship under that name too. 

I do have South African citizenship (through birth) but do not want to lose my German citizenship as foresee myself living there at some point in the future. 

My name is changed in South Africa which means my childrens' birth certificates, my identification in South Africa, tax clearance, my previous visa, everything, is all under my new forenames... 

 

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now