Moving to Berlin and my situation or question is unique

1,848 posts in this topic

8 minutes ago, RayD said:

1) For my income, I work independently making websites online. I also make small investments in stocks.  So I'm looking to move to Berlin, but I am not looking for a job over there. Do they allow you to get a residence permit, even if you're not planning on looking for a job? If they do, what do you need to show as proof that you can sustain yourself?

 

You cant just come and live here, being rich doesnt cut it.

 

8 minutes ago, RayD said:

2) If they don't allow you to get a residence permit without looking for a job, how difficult is it to find a job as a "high-skilled worker", provided that the only German I know right now is up to A1 level?

 

If you can build websites (HTML etc) then you can easily get a job.

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14 minutes ago, zwiebelfisch said:

 

You cant just come and live here, being rich doesnt cut it.

 

Hi,

 

Just curious...   Why would Germany not encourage people who are financially independent, can support themselves, and wouldn't be a drain on the local system?  While this may well be the case, it doesn't seem to make a lot of sense.

 

Surely if someone could demonstrate they can independently support themselves and any dependents financially, they'd be doing nothing but contributing to the economy and I can't see how that would be anything but desirable.

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19 minutes ago, Cantelope said:

Hi,

 

Just curious...   Why would Germany not encourage people who are financially independent, can support themselves, and wouldn't be a drain on the local system?  While this may well be the case, it doesn't seem to make a lot of sense.

 

Surely if someone could demonstrate they can independently support themselves and any dependents financially, they'd be doing nothing but contributing to the economy and I can't see how that would be anything but desirable.

 

I think there is some kind of system to buy your way in through investment. 

 

But generally most countries are quite wary about giving residency to people who dont work, and more relevant in your case they want a slice of your earnings as tax so they dont want you "not working" here and offshoring the money without some Beamter getting his grubby hands on it first.

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1 hour ago, RayD said:

1) For my income, I work independently making websites online. I also make small investments in stocks.  So I'm looking to move to Berlin, but I am not looking for a job over there. Do they allow you to get a residence permit, even if you're not planning on looking for a job?

 

If you have a job (and obviously you have one, making websites online) 'they' expect you to register yourself as self employed here and then 'they' will tax your worldwide income. You don't need to be an employee to get a residence permit. 

 

Quote

 

If they do, what do you need to show as proof that you can sustain yourself?

 

Basically steady taxable income. :) 

 

 

 

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44 minutes ago, zwiebelfisch said:

 

 

I think there is some kind of system to buy your way in through investment. 

 

But generally most countries are quite wary about giving residency to people who dont work, and more relevant in your case they want a slice of your earnings as tax so they dont want you "not working" here and offshoring the money without some Beamter getting his grubby hands on it first.

 

I get that, and you're right that it's not a situation unique to Germany, but I would have thought if cashed up people were to arrive and contribute by way of say, purchasing a home, spending on daily expenses and thereby contributing by way of paying MWT (VAT), paying for local services such as council fees, public transport etc, and supporting local businesses and thereby supporting employment etc, that'd be something to be encouraged.  Particularly at a time when Germany is being flooded with refugees and economic migrants which place such a strain on the economy.  I can't understand the rationale.

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47 minutes ago, Cantelope said:

 

I get that, and you're right that it's not a situation unique to Germany, but I would have thought if cashed up people were to arrive and contribute by way of say, purchasing a home, spending on daily expenses and thereby contributing by way of paying MWT (VAT), paying for local services such as council fees, public transport etc, and supporting local businesses and thereby supporting employment etc, that'd be something to be encouraged.  Particularly at a time when Germany is being flooded with refugees and economic migrants which place such a strain on the economy.  I can't understand the rationale.

Look at your own visa rules in Australia!  Even well off retirees cannot get a visa , except as an investor, have close family ties, and health coverage is restricted. Other visa applicants face very tough rules, as do most countries.

So, if you have skills that are needed, a viable business plan etc, plus German approved health insurance, then you ( or the US poster) may well get visa approval. The op may have a better chance than the other US  truck driver who asked same question!

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Sorry.  I probably should have been more clear.  It's this policy in general that I don't get.  Not specifically with respect to Germany.  I only referenced it to Germany as the forum is specific to Germany and the op's situation was related to Germany's rules.  The only difference with Germany's situation and Australia's is that we don't have the extra burden of trying to cover the additional economic impact of over a million refugees and economic migrants who, at least initially, will be a huge drain on resources. 

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1 hour ago, someonesdaughter said:

 

If you have a job (and obviously you have one, making websites online) 'they' expect you to register yourself as self employed here and then 'they' will tax your worldwide income. You don't need to be an employee to get a residence permit. 

 

 

Basically steady taxable income. :) 

 

 

 

Thanks. So basically, I would need to apply as "self-employed", but with my income coming outside of Germany, I guess.

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the tax savvy on this forum may correct me, but as I understand it if you are a resident and live in Germany for more than 5 months of the year, then you are also a resident for tax purposes no matter where your income is generated. I earn income in both Germany and outside with my work and I pay tax in Germany on all of it.There are various intercountry tax treaties that also allow for information sharing between countries to ensure this. So even if you dont "work" in Germany but plan on being a resident then I would guess you will not only need the health insurances but also pay tax on your worldwide income.

 

When I applied for my self employed residence visa I needed to prove that my services were "needed" in Germany, which I could easily do ... not sure if that is still a relevant requirement?!

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11 hours ago, RayD said:

Thanks. So basically, I would need to apply as "self-employed", but with my income coming outside of Germany, I guess.

 

You have to apply as self employed with your profession and (as kirakay said) you'll have to proof that there is a demand for that profession in Germany. e.g. contracts or letters of intent from (potential) German clients will do. And once you live in Germany – you said you want to move permanently – your total taxable worldwide income will be taxed in Germany. No matter where it comes from.

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8 hours ago, kirakay said:

the tax savvy on this forum may correct me, but as I understand it if you are a resident and live in Germany for more than 5 months of the year, then you are also a resident for tax purposes no matter where your income is generated.

If you´re a resident you have to pay tax in Germany, no matter for how long you live there. If you keep a residence (Wohnsitz) you´re considered a tax resident - even if you don´t make use of your residence at all. And the definition of a residence is very wide. I read about a case where a caravan parked in a farmer´s barn was regarded a residence.

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1 hour ago, someonesdaughter said:

You have to apply as self employed with your profession and (as kirakay said) you'll have to proof that there is a demand for that profession in Germany. e.g. contracts or letters of intent from (potential) German clients will do. And once you live in Germany – you said you want to move permanently – your total taxable worldwide income will be taxed in Germany. No matter where it comes from.

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OK, I'm confused now.  I would not have German clients. My clients would still be in the US. Would I still be able to apply without letters of intent or contracts from potential German clients?

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24 minutes ago, RayD said:

 

OK, I'm confused now.  I would not have German clients. My clients would still be in the US. Would I still be able to apply without letters of intent or contracts from potential German clients?

 

It would be difficult to get approved – why move to Germany when there is no need to? You can visit Germany as a tourist any time, for up to 90 days, and unlike many others you don't even need a visa s an US citizen but moving permanently is a different thing and 'I want to' is no legitimate reason. 

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Why confused? Usually, your place of residence is where you file taxes. So, if you register / get a visa for Germany, then here is where you file taxes. As a US citizen , it seems you also would have to file US taxes, but the tax agreements would apply, ( Search TT on this thorny issue!)

 

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42 minutes ago, RayD said:

 

OK, I'm confused now.  I would not have German clients. My clients would still be in the US. Would I still be able to apply without letters of intent or contracts from potential German clients?

 

The easiest way to come to germany is through a work permit and that means working in germany.  And for you that would mean proving that you are required for the german economy. ie that german business needs you.  

 

Alternatives exist, for example you could marry a german, or if you have a big enough piece of cash you could invest here.  I doubt any of those make much sense, so Id suggest you consider simply running your business here but for german clients, or just get a regular job which as I wrote a while back should be easy enough.

 

16 minutes ago, someonesdaughter said:

moving permanently is a different thing and 'I want to' is no legitimate reason. 

 

As others have said, this is nothing specific to germany virtually every other country has some kind of similar system.

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Thank you all for your replies. It seems the best way would be to look for a job and maintain myself with my work until I could find one. I believe I have up to 6 months of searching and if I can't find a job then I'd have to leave Germany.

 

6 hours ago, zwiebelfisch said:

As others have said, this is nothing specific to germany virtually every other country has some kind of similar system.

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The country I live in right now is outside of the US. And I've been living here legally, without a local job, while working with US clients for the past 5 years.

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9 hours ago, RayD said:

Thank you all for your replies. It seems the best way would be to look for a job and maintain myself with my work until I could find one. I believe I have up to 6 months of searching and if I can't find a job then I'd have to leave Germany.

 

 

The country I live in right now is outside of the US. And I've been living here legally, without a local job, while working with US clients for the past 5 years.

If you are granted a job search visa, I believe you have up to 12 months. Otherwise, you have 3 months on the tourist visa waiver, then you have to leave. It will have to be a skilled position for which no European citizen is available or a high-paying position that enables you to bypass the Vorrangprüfung.

 

A lot of recruiting in Germany is electronic anyway. There's nothing stopping you from looking for a job from your current location.

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@RayD post your pay slip in here when you get a job please.

We need to make sure it is a high paying position 

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