Moving to Berlin and my situation or question is unique

1,848 posts in this topic

4 hours ago, candylandriots said:

I was hoping not to have to hire a lawyer, but perhaps that will be money well-spent. Though every time I'm in Berlin, I feel like there are tons of Americans there that have gotten a visa one way or another, and I doubt that most of them hired expensive lawyers.

Lawyer´s fees are regulated in Germany. So they are not too high. An initial consultation will cost you about € 220 (unless you waive the regulated fee schedule).

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NO insurance from the US will work in Germany for a visa, permit etc, candylandriots! None! 

Catch22: you won´t be able to get the visa without the health insurance first:angry: I know, I know...

 

But where´s there´s a will,...

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16 hours ago, candylandriots said:

I guess my questions ultimately boil down to: are we likely to be more successful by pursuing some kind of retirement visa, or to seek employment?

 

Germany does not offer a retirement visa option. 

 

On the other hand, officials tend to be lax with Americans who have sufficient funds and a language permit should be an option (unless your Sachbearbeiter is feeling that you're trying to pull something funny). 

 

 

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You might want to contact Georgierose from that forum. She and her husband got a residence permit as pensioners without any problems.

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9 hours ago, engelchen said:

On the other hand, officials tend to be lax with Americans who have sufficient funds and a language permit should be an option

 

My older, but not yet retired American friend went to the Berlin Ausländerbehörde with financial documents proving a liquidity of $1.5 million and was told, "you might spend this money and it will be gone...permit refused".  He ended up getting his permit from Hungary.

 

Fast forward a few years...he goes back to the Ausländerbehörde and shows them a relatively modest social security income, "permit approved".  Never even asked about wealth or cash reserves.

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Hi, I'm living in Berlin. I'm a US citizen. I moved here in December. I have my Anmeldung. I found a "job," but because I don't have my resident permit yet the employer won't legally hire me. Can I get the employer to write a letter so I can take it to my local town hall to get my resident permit? Is this possible? Is this legal? 

 

Essence

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Hi upperLEFTY, that's a bit rough, sorry to hear about your "employer". If this really is a job where you are employed and the company pays your social contributions and half your health insurance, your employer needs to give you an employment contract to take to the Ausländerbehörde so that you can apply for a permit. They also need to fill out a form for you to take with you, too. It'll take a few weeks to get a decision. If your employer is unwilling to give you these documents, they're probably not willing to sponsor you and want someone who already has permission to work in Germany. How frustrating for you!

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Hi all,

 

I have a unique situation, I am a UK expat but currently a resident and employed in Berlin since November 2015 until Jan 31st 2017. I have just accepted a job offer in Hamburg which will start June 2017. March - May 2017 I will go back to the UK and work a three month contract before moving my life to Hamburg.

 

My question is what (if anything) should I do with my German residency status for those three months, I will have nowhere for my post to be redirected, and I don't want to really tell authorities I'm leaving for that time because I don't want to 're-register'

 

Any advice? let me know if you need more info

 

Harry

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As you are planning to continue living in Germany, and don't want to re-register, you should simply arrange with the landlord (or other tenants) at your former Berlin address to hang on to your mail until you have returned. Is it really so problematic to give them a temporary forwarding address?

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On 08/02/2017, 18:26:08, stussy said:

Hi all,

 

I have a unique situation, I am a UK expat but currently a resident and employed in Berlin since November 2015 until Jan 31st 2017. I have just accepted a job offer in Hamburg which will start June 2017. March - May 2017 I will go back to the UK and work a three month contract before moving my life to Hamburg.

 

My question is what (if anything) should I do with my German residency status for those three months, I will have nowhere for my post to be redirected, and I don't want to really tell authorities I'm leaving for that time because I don't want to 're-register'

 

Any advice? let me know if you need more info

 

Harry

 

I would try to keep onto you German residency, especially the case of Brexit. If you de-register and then register the German authorities might take your new date as the new date you arrived in Germany and not November 2015.  Keep your German residency. 

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You will continue to pay your health insurance in Germany? 

Re mail- you can arrange Nachsender to uk address for the 3 months with DePost, then  redirect back to German address. Works very well.

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On 19.1.2017, 14:28:35, upperLEFTY said:
On 19.1.2017, 14:28:35, upperLEFTY said:
On 20.1.2017, 12:30:56, RedTapeTranslation said:

Hi upperLEFTY, that's a bit rough, sorry to hear about your "employer". If this really is a job where you are employed and the company pays your social contributions and half your health insurance, your employer needs to give you an employment contract to take to the Ausländerbehörde so that you can apply for a permit. They also need to fill out a form for you to take with you, too. It'll take a few weeks to get a decision. If your employer is unwilling to give you these documents, they're probably not willing to sponsor you and want someone who already has permission to work in Germany. How frustrating for you!

Hi, I'm living in Berlin. I'm a US citizen. I moved here in December. I have my Anmeldung. I found a "job," but because I don't have my resident permit yet the employer won't legally hire me. Can I get the employer to write a letter so I can take it to my local town hall to get my resident permit? Is this possible? Is this legal? 

 

Essence

 

so apparently if you can't get a contract, you can also get an offer from your employer which describes in detail what you would be doing for them, for how many hours, for what pay etc. to take to the Ausländerbehörde. Maybe that's easier to get from your employer? I assume you know about the other documents you'll need to bring there? here's a list of the docs -

https://www.berlin.de/labo/willkommen-in-berlin/dienstleistungen/service.245714.php/dienstleistung/305304/en/

Fingers crossed for you! If you need any more advice, I can recommend the free legal advice from the Berlin Welcome Center: http://www.berlin.de/willkommenszentrum/en/

 

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Hello,

I have a quick question and didn't find already the topic in the forum, so I write here:

We have to move to Berlin from Dusseldorf in the next months, by your experience / knowledge, would it be cheaper hiring Umzug Firma from Duss or Berlin?

Thanks

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Hello. I've just arrived to Berlin, I'm here with working visa and a one-year contract, and about to start all the legal procedures. When I was getting my working visa I was told that the first thing I should do when I'm in Berlin is visiting "Einwohnermeldeamt" for registration. 

1) Is it the same as Burgeramt? because when I google for it google shows Burgeramts to me, and a person I've asked, told me that the first thing they had done was visiting Burgeramt...

2) If Burgeramt is the right thing, I've found such requirements: https://service.berlin.de/dienstleistung/120686/ . The main thing here is the confirmation from landlord and registration form. The trick is that I've rented a temporary flat for 2 weeks before arriving to Berlin, to have a place to stay, and now I'm in process of finding a more or less permanent accommodation, so I won't be in fact living by the address I currently live longer than 2 weeks and will move. Also, I can't provide confirmation from the landlord of this temporary flat since he's not in the city at the moment. The situation is that I'm gonna stay in Berlin for a year, and have to register within 2 weeks, but I'm gonna get a more or less permanent residence not earlier than in two weeks, and gonna be able to provide the doc from the landlord not earlier than in two weeks as well. What should I do in such a situation in order not to violate anything?

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6 minutes ago, youfailme said:

1) Is it the same as Burgeramt?

 

Yes.

 

6 minutes ago, youfailme said:

What should I do in such a situation in order not to violate anything?

 

Wait for two weeks. 

 

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Hello. I'm a US citizen looking to permanently move to Berlin with my wife and daughter.  We are taking a German A1 language course and we are planning on buying any international insurance that is accepted in Germany. I have a few questions that maybe someone can answer:

 

1) For my income, I work independently making websites online. I also make small investments in stocks.  So I'm looking to move to Berlin, but I am not looking for a job over there. Do they allow you to get a residence permit, even if you're not planning on looking for a job? If they do, what do you need to show as proof that you can sustain yourself?

 

2) If they don't allow you to get a residence permit without looking for a job, how difficult is it to find a job as a "high-skilled worker", provided that the only German I know right now is up to A1 level?

 

Thanks in advance for your advice

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