Moving to Berlin and my situation or question is unique

1,848 posts in this topic

I mean, you've already been told? You and your husband need health insurance immediately. Due to your pre-existing conditions, private insurance is likely not feasible for you, leaving public insurance as your only option, which is also quite expensive...

 

You need to register your address immediately, sublet or otherwise. You're unlikely to find a flat without a SHUFA and pay stubs, so sublet until you can scrape these together. 

 

That's a summary of what everyone in this thread has told you. It's all accurate. 

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We know what was expected of us before coming here. But knowing what we needed to do, and knowing in what order, and the best way to go about it doing it are quite different things. I'm really disappointed that so far 90% of this thread is receiving info and cautions I already knew, or people making weird assumptions that we're clueless and doomed to fail. Isn't the entire point of this website to help foreigners figure things out? To help each other and not to come in swinging assuming the person posting is an idiot who deserves ridicule and probing personal questions that are irrelevant? I could understand that you probably see a lot of people wandering into Berlin claiming to be artists of freelance workers who don't really have any purpose for being here, and that must be frustrating to many of you- especially with the housing shortage but that's no reason to jump onto to a thread where you know nothing about that person and assume they're just another idiot who thought it would be cool to spontaneously move to Berlin. This move has been in the works for years and for very good reasons. We have saved and sacrificed to make it here. But when you're getting conflicting information about basically everything it's overwhleming and you don't know where to begin. I hope I've made myself more clear.

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Honestly, the first things you should do are get health insurance and register your address. You can't do anything in Germany without an Anmeldung. I needed it for a mobile contract, a gym membership, a bank account, etc. You need it.

 

ETA: As a freelancer, my "employers" also made copies of my Anmeldung, so...

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1 hour ago, BAFritz said:

I'm really disappointed that so far 90% of this thread is receiving info and cautions I already knew,

 

Sorry, our crystal balls were all seized by customs. Apart from 'we've done research for 6 years, really' your input was nothing but poor. And then you got pissy.

 

Quote

but that's no reason to jump onto to a thread where you know nothing about that person 

 

How do you expect people to give you relevant info without any input from your side?  Stop that 'mimimi' and give it a new try. Ask specific questions and reveal what you already know.

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7 hours ago, someonesdaughter said:

I'd do so if I'd decide to migrate to Ireland. Maybe when that Irish Socialist Republic gets established.

 

Or before you post false, unhelpful information on an already difficult thread.

 

Wikipedia: "All persons resident in Ireland are entitled to receive health care through the public health care system" - usually we refer to it as 'socialist' but whatever floats your boat.

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In summary 

 

(1) get an appointment to register ASAP. Really. This is your top priority.

 

(2) your Irish health insurance is not valid here.

 

(3) Your husband, as a member of Ireland's NHS, is entitled to join the German public health insurance system.  You should probaby take professional advice on whether that's the best idea for him. Private insurance is cheaper but less comprehensive, and once in private it is extremely difficult to get into the public system later.

 

(4) With a pre-existing condition, you need public health insurance. This may well cost you €600-700 per month. There is, afaik, no way round this. German healthcare is quick, high-quality, bureaucratic, and expensive.  Also, start setting the money aside now, as you will have to pay premiums from the date you arrived in Germany, not from the date you signed the insurance contract. 

 

(5) It is possible to rent without a Schufa - we didn't have one when we first arrived either - just be prepared to demonstrate your financial stability. Put together a portfolio of bank statement, pay stubs etc together with written confirmation of any contracts you have lined up.

 

Good luck.

 

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2 hours ago, kiplette said:

 

Or before you post false, unhelpful information on an already difficult thread.

 

 

I have not idea what makes you so aggressive, I did not post "false, unhelpful information" – i asked a question. Re-read.

 

 

 

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As freelancer, your health insurance costs will be about 15% of your taxable income. As you have no German tax declaration yet, they will ask you to estimate it, and probably ask you provide a BWA after 3 and/or 6 months (BWA is prepared by your Steuerberater showing your income and costs to date. The health insurance is capped at about 48K of taxable income, and then it is flat, if you hit that, with TK now it is about 770 euros per month, for all services.

 

Once you have 2016 tax declaration, you send it to TK or whoever you are with, and they will base 2017 payments on that. If you paid too much in 2016, they will pay it back, if too little, they'll ask for more.

 

Regarding Schufa, you will have no schufa data until 3-6 months after starting to operate financially here, so with bank account, mobile phone contract etc. Your Irish credit record is not going to show up at all.

 

As others mentioned the 2 of you need German approved health insurance, Irish health insurance will not be relevant, and won't cover you or your partner once registered to live here.

 

Note the point above, you need to get yourself a German tax advisor, "Steuerberater" who will do your monthly accounts and can deal with the Finanzamt (Tax Office) on your behalf.

 

Colin

 

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2 hours ago, RelativeDimensions said:

(1) get an appointment to register ASAP. Really. This is your top priority.

 

(2) your Irish health insurance is not valid here.

 

(3) Your husband, as a member of Ireland's NHS, is entitled to join the German public health insurance system.  You should probaby take professional advice on whether that's the best idea for him. Private insurance is cheaper but less comprehensive, and once in private it is extremely difficult to get into the public system later.

 

(4) With a pre-existing condition, you need public health insurance. This may well cost you €600-700 per month. There is, afaik, no way round this. German healthcare is quick, high-quality, bureaucratic, and expensive.  Also, start setting the money aside now, as you will have to pay premiums from the date you arrived in Germany, not from the date you signed the insurance contract. 

 

(5) It is possible to rent without a Schufa - we didn't have one when we first arrived either - just be prepared to demonstrate your financial stability. Put together a portfolio of bank statement, pay stubs etc together with written confirmation of any contracts you have lined up.

 

To calm the waters, I think the OP is a bit stressed out with the situation, and being sick doesn't help, either. :)

The questions of both sides of the discussion are valid, and certainly will help other readers here.

 

I pretty much agree with the above answer:

ad 1. Registration is mandatory (except for tourists, but you are working here) within 2 weeks of arrival. Even if you are staying in a hotel or other temp accommodation.

However, as lots of members here have described, the Berlin city offices are overwhelmed. You're not very late at all.

I would go and get an appointment, and not even apologize for being late (you were sick, couldn't get an appointment sooner, were unsure if temp housing counts). If you can't get your landlord to sign your registration form, tell the office that. You do have to try, however.

 

ad 2. Well, your EHIC card *will* cover you if are travelling in the EU, as in temporary stay. Since you just got here a month ago *cough* *cough* (I didn't say anything) :). But yes, don't chance this, apply for German public health insurance immediately. Paying one month of back premiums sounds doable.

 

ad 3., 4. I agree, one or both of you should really try to join public health insurance here. If your income presently is below 450 Euros a month (you said you aren't working a lot), you could be added to to your husband's public health insurance for free.

As to both incomes counting, it seems to be correct (IF you are earning above the said 450 Euros).

You really need to talk to John G. or Starshollow about this! They are the resident TT insurance  experts.

 

ad 5. Yes, renting without a Shufa is possible. It's just another possible proof of a good financial background.

Collect income papers,contracts etc. and start hunting. It will take a while, and you need to lower expectations greatly, especially in your first rental.

Don't wire anything to Western Union, read up about housing scams, take along a German speaker for the viewings. :)

 

Good luck.

 

EDIT: colinmanning's advice above is excellent, btw.

 

 

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4 hours ago, someonesdaughter said:

I did not post "false, unhelpful information" – i asked a question. Re-read

 

It is worth learning to spot your own aggression. This current OP is sick, as Metall has pointed out, and some posts have been quite point-by-point condescending. I was not especially aggressive, and I still don't think you understand the point that getting it wrong is not helpful, and those repeated questions, whilst pedantically speaking, are not actually 'posting information', were certainly unhelpful and 3 seconds of googling, or even a careful read of the posts up till that point would have made that clear.

 

 

 

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34 minutes ago, kiplette said:

...

 

I have no idea why you singled me out for your off topic ad hominems as i have no idea why you regard "Was he?" as a "repeated question" and I have no idea what you declare as "post false, unhelpful information" but you know what: I don't care about your opinion.

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5 hours ago, Metall said:

 

To calm the waters, I think the OP is a bit stressed out with the situation, and being sick doesn't help, either. :)

 

 

 

 

 

1 hour ago, kiplette said:

This current OP is sick, as Metall has pointed out, and some posts have been quite point-by-point condescending. I was not especially aggressive,

 

 

 

 Thank you to both of you for recognizing I am in fact very ill, which limits me both physically and mentally, and that I am just trying to figure out the best way to do things. I avoided this thread because I was feeling very bullied and talked down to but was pleasantly surprised and relieved to see your posts. You've both brought some relief to another sick day where I am stuck in bed and feeling helpless not about to get much done. Thank you.

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16 hours ago, Metall said:

 

Exactly. Get a professional. John G. and Starshollow are respected members here, and independent insurance brokers.

They have sorted out much bigger messes. ;)

Also, get registered asap, even if it's just a sublet. The fines for not registering are ugly.

 

Thank you, is there a way I can privately message them on here?

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I'm sorry if you thought my point-by-point post was condescending. It was intended to be clear, and to cut through all the bitching that's cluttered up some of the discussions. 

 

To PM someone, just click on their avatar and then select the message option.

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Ha! Completely not you! Point by point can, as you say, be intended and come across as helpful. All in the tone, I suppose.

 

1 hour ago, someonesdaughter said:

I have no idea...

Sorry I couldn't make myself clear. 

 

 

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BAFritz, everything can still be sorted out. :)

Just don't delay anything, talk to the pros - they are honest enough to help you even if they don't sell you private insurance.

(Consider paying them a bit if they manage to get you two into public insurance. Private could be way more expensive.)

 

Bygones are bygones, it doesn't help to tell you if you've prepared well enough or things went haywire for other reasons.

Just handle it now, as much as you two can per day. Go and fight with the city office appointment page tomorrow morning. ;)

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Quick update on the Einzugsbestätigung issue. It seems that the "honeymoon period" in Berlin is over and the Amts are simply refusing to allow registration without one (although, as ever in Berlin, there may still be some offices where you can get away with it). 

 

This puts the entire onus for ensuring that the sublet is legal onto the tenant.

 

For future reference: make sure the sublet is legal and you can get an Einzugsbestätigung BEFORE you pay any money. 

 

If you are already in an illegal sublet, all you can do is move.  On the plus side, you could stop paying rent in the meantime, and it would be very difficult for the legal tenant to recover it...

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Hi all.

 

Hoping someone can help me. I believe that my situation is unique since it seems to have caused all manner of confusion with both the Ausländerbehörde in Berlin and three separate banks.

 

Any advice would be gratefully received.

 

I am an Australian citizen and have a German boyfriend. We met while he was living in Australia (he is a dual citizen and lived there for 14 years).

 

In April of this year he returned to Germany due to a work transfer. I followed and arrived on 30th May 2016.

 

Having done the appropriate reading as to our options for me staying in Germany, I applied for a language course visa. I had all of the appropriate documents EXCEPT the Sperrkonto  (blocked account). I had visited 3 separate banks (Commerz, Deutsche and Sparkasse) and each informed me that because I did not have a visa in my passport (notwithstanding the fact that a 3 month Schengen visa is automatically granted to Australians upon arrival but not recorded in your passport) they would not give me an account - blocked or otherwise.

 

The staff at the Ausländerbehörde (begrudgingly) granted me a 3 month Fiktionsbescheinigung that is valid until 1 November based on the fact that I had all the required documents and information etc, including a letter from Postbank saying that they would not give me a Sperrkonto without a visa.

 

They also gave me a letter outlining what I needed to bring to the next appointment and said that appointments for the week were released each Monday for the week ahead. 

 

(On an aside, my boyfriend used his EC card to pay the €20 fee since the Ausländerbehörde apparently don't accept cash or international (credit or debit) cards which seems a little odd for the Ausländerbehörde).

 

I then engaged with Deutsche Bank, having researched and thinking that they appeared to be the bank with the most information on Sperrkontos for international students.

 

I went to a branch and submitted my documents and was told that it would take 3 weeks to process.

 

After 3 and a half weeks, having heard nothing, I returned to the branch, only to be told that some of the documents were missing (which was not the case when I submitted them) and that although they hadn't bothered to advise me, I wasn't eligible for the blocked account for students since I was over 30. Ouch.

 

Anyway, they have opened a normal account and I have transferred (more than) the required amount for the Sperrkonto and they have provided a statement showing such. They have also provided a certified copy of my application for the account to be blocked (basically to be a Sperrkonto). I have not yet received my card, PIN, online banking details etc.

 

All good so far (kind of). I looked for an appointment 2 weeks ago at the Ausländerbehörde and the earliest I could get was 28th November. A small problem when my current visa expires on 1st November. And to make things trickier, I have to leave the country on Saturday to return to Australia for family reasons.

 

I intend to get up at 4am tomorrow and go to Charlottenburg and wait for a number to hopefully see someone to ask for an extension.

 

I was hoping someone could clarify for me (please)...

 

- what is my Schengen visa status? I received the Fiktionsbescheinigung on 1st August so by my calculations I still have 1 month left so can re-enter Germany on 10th November and attend the 28th November appointment with (by then) an active Sperrkonto and all will be well...hopefully?

 

- is there any way to manage the fact that according to what I have read (not via the Ausländerbehörde but unrelated websites), and experienced, the Ausländerbehörde doesn't accept cash or international Visa/Mastercard for fee payment?

 

- does anyone want to wager on the likelihood of my being granted a language course visa with only evidence of an account with more than the required amount of money in it but also a certified and stamped bank copy of my application for a block to be placed on the account? Or maybe just an extension to the Fiktionsbescheinigung so I can come back into the country and attend the appointment on 28th November?

 

Thanks so much in advance. I know a lot of this is "how long is a piece of string" but I am also aware that there are a number of well-versed experts here.

 

:-)

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Topics merged by admin

 

Hi guys

 

please forgive me if this has been asked already a million times but...

I'm a UK citizen looking at moving to Berlin.  I have a deep interest in German history, and fancied a change of pace.

My questions are mainly concerned with my employment status. 

 

1) I'm self employed as a specialist book dealer. I've also just started a publishing company, although have yet to publish my first book. Can someone tell me, in simple terms, what my tax situation would be? Is a similar percentage (20%) deducted as in the UK?

 

2) I would much prefer a physical location where I can go and get face-to-face advice. It seems no matter how much I read on the net, it's always long-winded and complicated advice. Human contact seems to work better for me. I'm thinking maybe a relocation advice center in Berlin itself, or perhaps somewhere like the German Embassy in the UK?

 

3) Someone recommended that I simply up sticks and move to Berlin, and work it out as I go along. I tend to plan every eventuality before I do something.  Is there any merit in following this person's advice?  I've never actually been, believe it or not, but I'm attracted by the relatively low cost of living, as opposed to my other option, which is to move to the Greater London area.

 

4) Speaking of costs and affordability, can someone please give me some average rent / bills prices? Referring back to agencies - are there any that will take care of everything for you? Find you a place to live, sort out utilities etc?

 

5) I'm sure I'll think of more stuff as I go along, but clearly my first step is to pay a visit to Berlin. Are there possibilities to stay with other British expats (Air BNB etc) and get first hand advice about how to make the move to Germany?

 

Many thanks in advance

 

Rich

 

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Have you checked the UK Government website about living and working in Germany?  Good outline of what is required- Registration, Health insurance etc.

Also use the TT search function  many threads about what is required.

 Check Immobilienscout24 for property/rental prices, but first you need to decide where you want to live and work. Do you have any connections in book publishing in Europe?

Have you visited Germany  often? Do you speak German?

Rents will differ in cities, outside, and states. Old East German states have been somewhat cheaper, but all prices up and rentals seem more  difficult to find. Yes, AirBNB in some places, as well as sub-letting.

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