Moving to Berlin and my situation or question is unique

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I agree with the first reply. EVERYTHING you have asked is mentioned in other posts on this site.. You simply need to take the time to search around through it.

 

Read through the Life in Berlin section.. or use the search box to find exactly what you're looking for.

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You do know that Munich is the center of movie and TV production in Germany?

There's still Babelsberg in Potsdam...

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Hi,

We have a list of questions, can someone answer them please :)

 

1. Can you get work as a painter and decorator without qualification, only experience? What opportunities are there to be someone's apprentice?

 

2. Can you survive on a live-out Nanny/Au-Pair's wage? (as a full time job so able to pay rent, eat etc..)

 

3. What qualifications do you need to work in a kindergarten? I can speak German quite well (particuarly on a child's level from being an Au-Pair) and natively, English.

 

4. How can we from the UK, obtain regular copies of the Berliner Zeitung Morgenpost?

 

5. If you speak no German, is there any scope for barwork? I have seen a few people talking about a place called White Trash? Has anyone more info?

 

Thanks!

 

Topics merged by admin

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Painting work - you ideally need to be a qualified Malermeister yeap a fully trained painter - there is no shortage of painters here - not impossible to get work as an unqualified painter

 

nanny wage - that would be tight to surive on a live out nanny wage - are you a qualified nanny? - have you paperwork? - then perhaps - qualified au pairs with paperwork are hard to come buy in Berlin - the official paperwork would give you the edge

 

You can read the Berliner Morgenpost online daily or use the Abo (subscription) service costs EUR30 to Europe Berliner Morgenpost Abo

 

Need to speak a little German - over 25,000 native English speakers in Berlin who already speak fluent German

White Trash

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1. Yes. If you already speak German it might be not so difficult, you just need some connections. Provided you have general renovation skills and not only painting. They do not pay well and the work is very hard. You will make good money only if you are the boss.

 

2. Difficult. It might be possible is you find a full time job and you are frugal.

 

5. It is very difficult to find a job in bars/restaurants if you speak no German at all, because, you know, you have to talk to the customers. Some Irish bars hire English speaking people sometimes. White Trash is a big happening and touristic bar/restaurant in P.Berg, some people said they hire Americans that do not speak English out of supporting their own, however, you can not expect that a bar is going to hire every English speaking people coming to Berlin.

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Is this for the kindergarten question? because if so, its not entirely true.. I worked as a teacher's assisant with good enough pay, at the American Consulate Kindergarten with NO german training, actually NO teaching experience whatsoever.. and without speaking any German.. The workers were both American and British...

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Hi Cherrie, I read this thread, I am wondering how you are doing? How are you finding Berlin? I am planning on moving there next year. Any pointers? or sound advise for someone wanting to do what you have achieved? I am living London, im 28 Female im orginally from South Africa, I cant speak any German, I probw ill be able to do any job i could find, and hopefully will be coing with money to help me for about a month. Hope you are doing well and enjoying Berlin! x

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HI Cherrie,

just read your note.

I've lived in Berlin for over 25 years now and have been thinking of moving back to spain.

Hmm, I can understand your point of view. Barcelona and Berlin are like day and night. Good sides and bad sides.

If you would like some advice, please feel free to send me a mail. I'm off to Stuttgart for 3 days but I'll be back on Saturday.

ginevrajarvis@hotmail.com

 

greetings

ginny

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Hello,

 

I am in the process of moving here with my partner and there are so many things to take care of that I am feeling overwhelmed instead of excited. I have a job that starts in January so that's sorted but now there are a million other things to do. I have every intention of learning German but until I do I could really use some help and advice.

 

1) which bank should I set up an account with? Is there one known for it's friendly, English speaking staff?

2) i will brave the german web sites and newspapers but for the moment i am limited to craigslist for English apartment listings and every second one seems to be a scam so right now i'm couch surfing which means...

3) can i register for a tax card even without a permanent address?

4) i know this has been covered in previous posts but what's the deal with health care?!

 

thanks in advance for your help and time.

 

kristi (who is not normally so frazzled)

 

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First of all, calm down. You can do this.

 

1) Your best bet is one of the larger banks: Deutsche Bank, Dresdner Bank etc. Contact them while couch-surfing and ask if their staff speaks sufficient English.

2) immobilienscout.de is fairly reliable

3) No. When you register you check the box requesting a tax card

4) That will depend on your income. Most public insurances cover basic needs, you might want supplemental dental care.

 

To all of the above: Use the search function, read the (newest) responses to this discussion, make notes. De-frazzle.

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I had no idea there were so many other discussions. (i'm just figuring out this site) In any case, thank-you so much for your help.. im sure i'll make some decent progress once i'm done sorting through all that information!

 

thanks again!

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Im a newcomer from the US and dont even have a job...running into problems finding one!!! Havent learned German myself either...am interested in doing so to make my life more manageable but finding a job is so important right now...

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I'm also hoping to move in the new year and have some additional questions. I'm trying to organise a job before moving but haven't been successful so far. My background is in computer science and I'm a decent programmer

 

1) what is the market like for software developers in Berlin?

2) in Dublin, a common way to find a job is to use a recruitment agency. Are they as popular in Berlin or do people tend to apply directly to ads in the press?

3) if I can't find a job in that area, I'd hope to find something in the temp or general office areas while I look for something more suitable. Is there much in the way of temp/office work?

 

I speak German.

 

Thanks for any help

 

Steve

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looks like a lot of the best places to live are flat shares or 3 bedroom. Anyone looking for a room mate? Or anyone have a flat?

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As much as I love Berlin, (I have lived here for nearly 4 years), in hindsight, I wouldn't come here looking for work, I also trained as an english teacher back in the U.K, but I have been doing almost everything to make a living apart from teaching English, working in call centres and in telesales. I have done some part time work as a counsellor on summer camps, but finding full time teaching work is not easy when that is what almost every other English native speaker is trying to do to make a living.

I'm curious about the attraction of Berlin for Americans, what do you hear about it that makes it so enticing? Is it the history or the cultural side of it? If the latter, then I would suggest looking at living in London, Barcelona, or even Prague. Berlin is no longer cool IMO, it's turned in to a playground for Brits (I don't include myself in this demographic) and others from wealthier parts of europe who are buying up property with the result that rents are going up, formerly happening areas (like Mitte) are now full of trustafarians and wealthy couples wheeling their kids around in 2000 Euro pushchairs. Berlin is having the 'alternative' life squeezed out of it.

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Hey everybody,

well everybody that mentioned that getting a job is really hard is right. There are a whole lot of Germans that don't find a job which is sad but the truth.

If you want a job it is always an advantage to speak both German ( which is normally required) and English.

As for the english teachers under y'all have you tried talking to either big businesses or language schools for Germans? I know my parents are in the bank industry and they need english. But especially in the east part not a lot of the "older" generation ( sry I'm 20 ;-)) speak proper english becasue they either didn't leran it to begin with or didn't see a reason in learning it properly.

Especially for the computer and software industry I would reccomend to log in to xing.de which is a business platform where you can also find jobs.

Answering the question as to if it's more common to answer newspaper adds I have to say yes. There are agents that help Germans with finding a job but most of the time they only have a limited number of adds and a lot of applicants so platforms such as xing and the newspaper would be your best bet. Or you could send "blind job applications" which is what some germans do. You write an application and just send it to a company no matter if they have an add open or not. Sometimes that can work.

I hope I could help y'all so far.

Stef

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As much as I love Berlin, (I have lived here for nearly 4 years), in hindsight, I wouldn't come here looking for work, I also trained as an english teacher back in the U.K, but I have been doing almost everything to make a living apart from teaching English, working in call centres and in telesales. I have done some part time work as a counsellor on summer camps, but finding full time teaching work is not easy when that is what almost every other English native speaker is trying to do to make a living.

I'm curious about the attraction of Berlin for Americans, what do you hear about it that makes it so enticing? Is it the history or the cultural side of it? If the latter, then I would suggest looking at living in London, Barcelona, or even Prague. Berlin is no longer cool IMO, it's turned in to a playground for Brits (I don't include myself in this demographic) and others from wealthier parts of europe who are buying up property with the result that rents are going up, formerly happening areas (like Mitte) are now full of trustafarians and wealthy couples wheeling their kids around in 2000 Euro pushchairs. Berlin is having the 'alternative' life squeezed out of it.

Culture is part of it, but also the cost of living is still VERY low here compared to any of the 'happening' cities in the US--do you have any idea what an apartment costs in New York or San Francisco? London is no better. I agree that Berlin has changed since I arrived here 7 years ago and not entirely for the better, but there is so much more to the city than Mitte and Prenzlauer Berg. I rarely go to those areas unless I absolutely have to. I think it's also easier for Americans to get visas here than in Spain or the UK and things have apparently gotten tougher in the Czech Republic as well. It is a far more laid back, less crowded city than Barcelona or London with tons of green space, lakes, etc.

 

I think Berlin appeals to a lot of Americans who seek an urban New York kind of lifestyle but are totally priced out of that in their own country. Berlin more than any other city has a lot of parallels with the New York of the 80s as far as the art scene, music and clubbing, plus you don't have to live in a rat and cockroach infested shoebox and pay $2000 a month for the privilege.

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Are you a US citizen? If so are you married to a EU citizen? If not, then you won't get a work permit. Just like a EU citizen cannot just turn up in the USA and get a work permit, non-EU citizens cannot simply arrive in Germany (or other EU citizens) and expect to get a work permit.

 

I also am wondering as previously posted what the big draw is suddenly to Berlin? as a city with the highest unemployment rate for any major European city of its size.. (18% unemployment) Getting a work permit if you are not married to an EU citizen or do not have some super special skill that 99% of the germans do not have in some which, way, or form, is going to be a very daunting task..

 

Hint of advice all you people that SUDDENLY want to jump on a plane and move to Berlin, have a job waiting for you in black and white,(Arbeitsvertrag) or have a very large bank account before hand to intially support yourself..

 

Take some advice from us expats that have been living here quite some time... we are all looking for that 'mystical great paid full time job'!!! and mostly just get by to pay the bills.. ITS NOT FUN! (look seriously first at london, barcelona, etc..) dont mean to be a downer, just showing you the reality, not the rosy colored version of life in Berlin..

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