Moving to Berlin and my situation or question is unique

1,848 posts in this topic

Robertos. The links you have been given are great. If your car is a right hand drive ( you mentioned UK) it may be expensive to convert. To get a better idea of food prices, try using this online shopping site... Www.rewe-online.de. You can add all your shopping to the list to get an idea of prices. Rewe is a popular supermarket here though you can buy a lot of items cheaper at other stores though it will give you a good idea and has a fairly large range...including beer :D

 

Good luck

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I make 1500 EUR netto per month and I live "comfortably", but I don't have a family to support. I pay my rent, food, alcohol, BVG, phone, gym, private German classes and I have money left to travel around a little bit. I kept the same lifestyle as in Canada, but the difference is, I'm not putting away money in a saving account anymore.

 

Maybe it's doable with 2000, but you'd have to define what living comfortably means to you.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"Comfortably" for me means more or less the same.

German lessons in a company I'm applying to are for free. I was learning german for 3 years but I haven't been using it for over 8, so I have to refresh my skills. Now I can understand a technical documentation in german but not order a pizza by phone :) .

Moreover 2000E netto is the worst scenario - tax category 1 and without Kindergeld and additional salary sources. So I'm analysing the worst option.

I decided to consider working in Germany because as for an engineer I think Germany gives one of the best developing perspectives. In my current job if I stay here for 2-5 years more, sadly nothing will change.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Moreover 2000E netto is the worst scenario - tax category 1 and without Kindergeld and additional salary sources. So I'm analysing the worst option.

I decided to consider working in Germany because as for an engineer I think Germany gives one of the best developing perspectives.

 

If you already have professional experience you should keep looking; 40k is an entry-level salary for an engineer (and many recent graduates earn even a little more).

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm an Australian student with a British Passport looking to move to and study in Berlin in the coming weeks. Before I do so, I need some insight from you knowledgeable folk on a few things.

 

Below I've created a checklist of everything I'll need to do when I touch down, so please check it out and tell me if I've forgotten anything/got anything wrong.

 

- Find a WG and register at Anmeldamt within first few weeks (tax file number will be sent afterward) & open bank account

- Apply for Freizügigkeitsbescheinigung (freedom of movement certificate) from local Buergeramt

- With tax file number, health insurance & Freizügigkeitsbescheinigung, apply for work

- Employer will sort Social Insurance Number in conjunction with health insurance

- Once I have evidence of income, apply for Bescheinigung des Daueraufenthalts (residence permit) at Rathaus(as I plan to settle in Berlin)

 

Is there anything else, in terms of paperwork?

 

Also, if I have a British Passport, do I need to have a/state my purpose for entering Germany? I haven't enrolled at any universities so far, as I plan to work and learn the language properly before i do so.

Also, is there a minimum amount of funds needed to enter the country as a resident, as evidence of self-sufficiency?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

- You're supposed to register your address within 7 days of arrival, even if it's a temporary one. You should start looking for a WG now.

- The whole Freizügigkeitsbescheinigung is a bit up in the air, but the general verdict is that you don't need it if you hold a British passport. You can read the related threads for more information (use the search box on the upper right)

- You'll need to get the health insurance thing sorted sooner rather than later. There are numerous threads on that. "Apply for work" is a bit optimistic if you don't speak German - There's a thread on that, too

- You have to be in the country for at least 5 years to get the Daueraufenthaltserlaubnis, but that's irrelevant if you have a British passport

 

The most important thing you have to worry about is health insurance. If you neglect it now, it will come back and bite you in the ass later. Finding a place to live can be challenging, depending on your standards, because everyone and their cousin have decided that Berlin is THE place to be. Finding a job as a non-German speaker can be even more challenging, for the same reason, because all the non-German speakers are chasing the same few jobs. Aside from the fledgling IT startup scene, the only real industry Berlin has to speak of is tourism, and tourism jobs pay shitty wages. If you know IT (meaning development languages or network administration), your chances will be much better.

 

Good luck, and welcome to Toytown. Once again, please use the search box on the upper right. All the issues you have addressed have been discussed at length in other threads.

6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

- Apply for Freizügigkeitsbescheinigung (freedom of movement certificate) from local Buergeramt

- With tax file number, health insurance & Freizügigkeitsbescheinigung, apply for work

 

The Freizügigkeitsbescheinigung was withdrawn in January this year. There is no more need for one.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good Morning,

 

I’m a citizen born in Munich and have a living permit for Germany and a US Passport. That’s why I can live here: I don’t want to discourage anyone moving here: but … (and please don’t think I’m a snob or anything)

 

1.) if you don't plan on working in Berlin and just want to live here and spend your savings then speaking German is not necessary since most people here speak English.

 

2.) if you want to rent a place, you only get one to rent with a signed contract from an employer (current proof of three months consecutive income). You only get work with a residence- and work permit, and you only get that with a “Meldebestätigung”, and you only get that with a signed lease …..it’s like the snail eating it’s tail, and as previously stated: Bureaucracy is BIG here!

 

…..If you are self employed finding a nice place to rent in a NICE neighbourhood with out working contract: impossible.

 

3.) Due to the downtrade of overall European economy you will compete with HIGHLY trained young people from Greece, Spain,

France and other major European countries for a JOB.

Berlin has seen a rise in Europeans moving here quite a bit the last two years, since they believe Berlin is the land of milk and honey. It ain’t.

 

4. If you want to buy a place - same with renting. The good stuff is nearly gone unless you plan spending 3500.- to 4800+ .- Euros / sqm.

 

5.) Berlin is a low income City: Average income is below 10.- Euros/hour.

and yes, it’s fairly cheap to live, but even that is changing.

 

6.) If you are rich or are going to be send over here by your employer, then you have NOTHING to worry about.

 

Welcome to Berlin, its fun in the Summer and Winters are long.

2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I need some help with health insurance.

 

I'm going to stay just 3-4 months in Berlin in a WG (I have €5000 to cover expenses). I have read that there is voluntary public health insurance but I am not eligible for that. I have no health insurance (except travel insurance) at the moment and I haven't had any for the past 3 years. How do I get health insurance in Germany then?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

How do I get health insurance in Germany then?

 

Contact Starshollow or John.G for a quote.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey guys, although most people here advise a lot about how easy it is to get around in English I've found that the only place that gets tricky is with any of your government-related papers - I tried a couple times to speak English with them but they refused to speak it and would only reply in German. So in the end, I've learned German and it's made living here a thousand times better. If you want to live in a foreign country (especially if it's more long term), it's respectful and helpful to learn the local language and cultures. :) But that's just my two cents, everyone has different experiences related to language in Berlin :D.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

[adminmerge][/adminmerge]

 

Right, first of all I'm just going to say that I've been reading around this forum a fair bit and a lot of it is really helpful, I know that a lot of questions I'm going to ask in this thread may have all been answered elsewhere, but I would greatly appreciate any help given to me in this thread.

 

Okay, so I've just graduated from a Media and Drama degree from a university in Liverpool with a pretty great grade. My main ambition in life is acting (and film) and its my dream to make a career out of it. I auditioned for drama schools in the UK this winter and sadly didn't get in to any, so I feel like I've got a year of my life to play with, with no commitments. Recently the UK has started to bring me down massively, it's another goal of mine to make sure I don't live in the UK all of my life so I can't think of a better time than now to achieve this goal.

I've visited Berlin a couple of times and like many I've fallen in love with the city, and after a lot of consideration I've decided that it's here that I want to spend this year in. I'm not as naive to think that visiting as a tourist is going to be anywhere near the same as actually moving there though so I know I'm going to have to over come some/a lot of struggles.

 

So, as I've said, I'm only planning on staying in the country for a year, give or take 2 months, and my aim is to get there by mid October of this year. I've started learning German and although I'm still at a very beginner stage I'm enjoying it and I think I'm picking it up fairly well.

 

First of all, regarding living arrangements, a WG is obviously going to be the best thing to suit my needs.

With this, am I right in thinking that there's nothing I can really arrange until closer to the time I actually plan on moving over there, as it's far too early to ask people to hold a room for me now, or is there anyway I could find a place any earlier?

What would be the case if I didn't get on with the people I end up living with, how easy is it to change places or once you sign the contract, are you there for the whole thing (I only ask this because I've ended up living with some pretty nasty people in Liverpool so I'm quite cautious of this, but I know I've got a 99% chance of things being all right)

If I don't manage to find somewhere to live through the web, and have to stay in a hostel for a couple of nights, is there any protocol for this? Like, is there paper work I'd have to fill in to state that the hostel is going to be my temporary address, and do I have a limited time to find somewhere permanent to live?

 

With earning money, I'm really not too fussed on what I do as a job, as long as I earn enough money to live on and do a couple of sociable things a week with my flatmates or whatever, I'll be more than happy. Again, I'm not silly, I know there aren't too many jobs in Berlin in the first place, adding that I'm still a beginner with the language isn't going to make things better, but after reading a lot about other peoples experiences I know that it isn't impossible. I don't want to start a career there, and I'm fully prepared to give my acting a back seat for my time there (although any acting work I could possibly get would be amazing)

So, like with my living situation, I'd love to have a job or at least a few interviews fixed before I get there, is there any websites that people could show me that would point me in the right direction of this? What would be my best bet regarding a job over there? I've read about certain bars and restaurants scamming people into free work, how could I avoid this?

So yeah, any websites or info or personal experience here would be great!

 

I've heard many things about having to fill a lot of paperwork out when I move there, but I've never really seen a distinctive list of what this is, so if anyone can give me a heads up on this as well, it'd be very nice.

 

I think that's all for now.

I know that this might be a really silly decision I've made, but I won't ever know until I go in head first. I have money saved up to live off initially if it takes me a while to find my feet. I feel prepared for the challenge, and any help from any of you would be amazing.

A few posts I've read from people on here come across as unnecessarily negative and also quite nasty and scaremongering, so it'd be nice if stuff like that could be kept out of this thread as I know the majority of people on here are here to help.

 

Cheers

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Greets, matty! I wish you well, no negative vibes - I was once your age and changed countries, continents etc. No idea how you will get work, no idea who you will share a flat with and all the rest of it. Absolutely no idea but I hope others will respond.

 

I can only give one tip/ negative warning ( ok, contradiction). Please read carefully as a young person - there is NO NHS here - you are not automatically health insured - you have to do research and pay for health insurance...serious tip, ok?

4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi, I was wondering if anyone has used or knows about this website http://www.crocodilian-berlin.de/suchen.php

My friend and I are thinking of renting a flat from there for our first 2 months or so.

According to my google research it seems ok, but it's a lot of money to pay, maybe without even seeing the flat, so I would appreciate any information you may have

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Suzanne, I used them a couple of years ago. It worked out fine for me, and I haven't heard of any real problems from anyone else. The fee is a fair amount, so I guess you have to decide if it's worth it to you to have accommodations lined up for the first couple of months (for me it was).

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

[adminmerge][/adminmerge]

Hi everyone. I have lived in the US since '96. I want to move back for several reasons (family, security, safety and because my roots are so strong, I don't feel 'home' in the US). What should I know or prepare for in terms of paperwork, housing, schools, work? I am currently self employed and own a massage therapy business. My kids are highly intelligent and in 5 and 6th grade (10 and 12 years old). I am a german citizen and my kids are both german and american passports. I am divorced. Thanks all for your responses!! :)

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

What should I know or prepare for in terms of paperwork, housing, schools, work? I am currently self employed and own a massage therapy business. My kids are highly intelligent and in 5 and 6th grade (10 and 12 years old).

How well do your children speak (and more importantly write) German? Will you be receiving child support for the kids? I doubt you'll be able to support 2 kids as a massage therapist in Berlin (and although you are eligible for HartzIV (welfare) I wouldn't recommend moving here if you'd need it). Do you have German or American qualifications?

3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

[adminmerge][/adminmerge]

Hi everyone. I have lived in the US since '96. I want to move back for several reasons (family, security, safety and because my roots are so strong, I don't feel 'home' in the US). What should I know or prepare for in terms of paperwork, housing, schools, work? I am currently self employed and own a massage therapy business. My kids are highly intelligent and in 5 and 6th grade (10 and 12 years old). I am a german citizen and my kids are both german and american passports. I am divorced. Thanks all for your responses!!

 

Are you looking at local schools or would you also consider international schools (especially if tuition-free)? Is the father an American or at least a native English speaker? That might help get the kids into an international school like JFK.

 

As for work, I don't know anything at all about massage qualifications there versus here, but I think engelchen's question is a good one: would they be acceptable for the purposes of working here? I do know that, aside from one person I know here, good masseuses with a high-level of massage know-how (i.e., not Krankengymnastik, not physiotherapists, and not that silly Swedish/relaxation stuff but people who can actually do deep tissue) and who are fluent in English can be really difficult to find. But then, that's what I'm looking for, maybe not what the average Berliner might be looking for.

 

Also, I presume that, even though you're divorced, you are getting some form of child support from your ex on a regular basis? If that's the case, then you might be able to support the two kids on your salary, Kindergeld, plus that support, especially if his payments are based on a U.S. salary in a place like NYC or SF. It would probably be tight for a while, but it's feasible.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now