Moving to Berlin and my situation or question is unique

1,846 posts in this topic

 

Thanks for all the responses, although I must confess I am still a little confused - so dual nationality is permitted for a UK national taking on German citizenship?

 

Once I have completed my 8 weeks at the Goethe Institut as I say I will be looking to work but if I dont find employment straight away will I be eligible for whatever the dole is called in Germany either as an EU or German national? Is this a nightmare to sign up for (esp. bearing in mind my far-from-perfect German)?

As colin says, the germans aren't going to give you german taxpayers' money when you haven't worked a day there-however you can sign on in the UK (allowing for any disqualification period if you voluntarily left work etc.) BEFORE you leave for Germany and there's a form E303 (I think) you get in the UK and take with you to Germany (to the Arbeitsamt) and you can get your UK benefits in Germany for at least 13 weeks but you must be seeking work of course. After the 13 weeks the money stops but you might find it easier to get Sozialhilfe if you're "in the system" as unemployed rather than just showing up asking for german money with broken german.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Again, I have some idea what I am talking about (double citizenship) because I have friends with double citizenship and because I am giving up mine to take the German one.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello!

 

I have read through the whole topic but I am still a little confused. Apparently I need things spelled out for me. I am a 21 year old Canadian girl moving to Berlin next week. I already have a working holiday visa and insurance and whatnot, as well as a place to live when I get there. What exactly do I need to do and where do I need to go to register when I get to Berlin? Thanks!!!

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Again, I have some idea what I am talking about (double citizenship) because I have friends with double citizenship and because I am giving up mine to take the German one.

I don't doubt that there are people with double citizenship, however if you tell the German authorities that you have another citizenship, they will take your German one away. The Irish embassy informed me some years ago when I was discussing the situation with regard to my daughters Irish passport that they simply don't tell the Germans, and then people can keep both citizenships, however the offical German line is that if you are a citizen of another country, you cannot be a German citizen.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Hello!

 

I have read through the whole topic but I am still a little confused. Apparently I need things spelled out for me. I am a 21 year old Canadian girl moving to Berlin next week. I already have a working holiday visa and insurance and whatnot, as well as a place to live when I get there. What exactly do I need to do and where do I need to go to register when I get to Berlin? Thanks!!!

Once you know which area you will be living in (Bizirk - e.g. Steglitz, prenzlauer Berg, Mitte etc), you go to the local Bizirksamt (the place where local government for the area is managed), and at the recemtion tell that you want to register as a local resident (anmelden). You will need to fill out a form, (which you can do in advance - they can be bought in stationary shops like "McPaper"). You'll need your passport, and the rental contract for your apartment/room. It only takes a couple of minutes once you get to the top of the queue!

 

Once you have your resident document, you can organise everything else. You do need it for many things such as opening a bank account, and even buying a mobile phone (even if you only want a "pre paid" phone, the still want proof of where you live).

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello

 

This is a message for Colin and to all others who have given me advice. I have actually now been offered the job in Berlin! Yippieeeee! So much to sort out! Where to begin? I am fortuate that I have someone from my workplace to help me with all the formalities and finding an apartment. Thanks to you all for your advice - I am sure I will be asking many more questions in the coming weeks and months!

 

All the best.

 

Fibi

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

I don't doubt that there are people with double citizenship, however if you tell the German authorities that you have another citizenship, they will take your German one away. The Irish embassy informed me some years ago when I was discussing the situation with regard to my daughters Irish passport that they simply don't tell the Germans, and then people can keep both citizenships, however the offical German line is that if you are a citizen of another country, you cannot be a German citizen.

No. Again, it is possible to LEGALLY have dual citizenship but only under special circumstances (there is a reason why you can not give up your other citizenship, i.e. it is too expensive for you to give it up).

 

Kids can always have double citizenship but once they are 18 they have to choose one.

 

And keeping the other citizenship and not informing the German authorities is not a very good idea, you might end up in jail.

 

If you really need more information about it, I suggest you consult a lawyer.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Kids can always have double citizenship but once they are 18 they have to choose one.

That's not what the irish Embassy told me. They were explicit on the issue that if a child has a German passport, and then wants an Irish one, technically they need to give up the German one, but nobody ever does bother to tell the German authorities. German children typically have a "Honderausweis" which may have a different status. However I don't know the technicalities, and I don't know the law - just telling what I was told (7 years ago)

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

if a child has a German passport, and then wants an Irish one, technically they need to give up the German one

 

...

 

German children typically have a "Honderausweis"

Naturalisation as a German citizen

 

German citizenship may be acquired by naturalisation by those with permanent residence who have lived in Germany for 8 years. Additional requirements include an adequate command of the German language and an ability to be self-supporting without recourse to welfare.

 

Applicants for naturalisation are normally expected to prove they have renounced their existing nationality, or will lose this automatically upon naturalisation. An exception applies to those unable to give up their nationality easily (such as refugees). A further exception applies to citizens of European Union member states that do not require Germans to renounce citizenship upon naturalisation in that country.

 

§ 25 Staatsangehörigkeitsgesetz

 

(1) Ein Deutscher verliert seine Staatsangehörigkeit mit dem Erwerb einer ausländischen Staatsangehörigkeit, wenn dieser Erwerb auf seinen Antrag oder auf den Antrag des gesetzlichen Vertreters erfolgt, der Vertretene jedoch nur, wenn die Voraussetzungen vorliegen, unter denen nach § 19 die Entlassung beantragt werden könnte. Der Verlust nach Satz 1 tritt nicht ein, wenn ein Deutscher die Staatsangehörigkeit eines anderen Mitgliedstaats der Europäischen Union, der Schweiz oder eines Staates erwirbt, mit dem die Bundesrepublik Deutschland einen völkerrechtlichen Vertrag nach § 12 Abs. 3 abgeschlossen hat.

 

"Honderausweis"

 

post-19115-1209488721.jpg

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Naturalisation as a German citizen

Applicants for naturalisation are normally expected to prove they have renounced their existing nationality, or will lose this automatically upon naturalisation. An exception applies to those unable to give up their nationality easily (such as refugees). A further exception applies to citizens of European Union member states that do not require Germans to renounce citizenship upon naturalisation in that country.

This sounds pretty definitive. I guess that Germany has altered its position since 7 years ago, as part of harmonisation of its laws with EU statutes. So it is clear that EU citizens can now take up German citizenship while keeping their original citizenship. I'm not sure what anyone gains in having two EU citizenships, but if that what some folks want to do, so be it.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Hello

 

This is a message for Colin and to all others who have given me advice. I have actually now been offered the job in Berlin! Yippieeeee! So much to sort out! Where to begin? I am fortuate that I have someone from my workplace to help me with all the formalities and finding an apartment. Thanks to you all for your advice - I am sure I will be asking many more questions in the coming weeks and months!

 

All the best.

 

Fibi

Great news - hope you get all organised and get to Berlin for the summer - the weather is finally beginnning to turn for the better, and the trees are now filling out, so the city is entering its best period.

 

Feel free to hit us with questions,a nd once settled don't forget to invite us all to your moving in party.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

That's not what the irish Embassy told me. They were explicit on the issue that if a child has a German passport, and then wants an Irish one, technically they need to give up the German one, but nobody ever does bother to tell the German authorities. German children typically have a "Honderausweis" which may have a different status. However I don't know the technicalities, and I don't know the law - just telling what I was told (7 years ago)

I was talking about the German regulations, of course you have to consider as well the regulations of the other country. If the other country does not allow double citizenship at all then you will have to choose.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ireland and UK have no problems with double citizenship - the issue in the past has always been Germany. However it is clear that by adapting to EU ways of doing things, Germany has fallen into line - at least with regard to other EU countries.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, the kids can have double citizenship and decide what they want to choose when they are 18, I do not see how Germany is failing, at least with the kids.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I never said that Germany was failing - I was simply pointing out to a UK citizen who was considering taking up German citizen that Germany did not recognize double citizenship. It now appears that my information is out of date, as since my last information, 7 years ago, Germany now appears to recognise dual citizenship within the EU. I never said the German position was a failing, simply pointed that the situation existed and someone thinking of taking up German citizenship should consider if they want to give up their original citizenship. Clearly for EU citizens this is not the case, and if you read my earlier posts in this thread you will see that I don't see why an EU citizen (from old EU states at least) needs to take up German citizenship, as they can live here with full rights. As far as I can tell, then only differences in being a German rather than an UK or Irish citizen are that you can you can vote in federal elections, and if male and of a certain age, you will be forced into national service!

 

So nothing wrong with the German position, and if anyone wants German citizenship, I promise that I won't interfere!!!

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for everyones help and advice much appreciated - admittedly the main reason that I considered taking up a German passport was I hoped that it might qualify me for extra state assistance and I hoped it might eliminate some of the bureaucracy that foreign residents have to go through (although for EU citizens that doesnt seem to be too excesssive). Neither of these seem to apply however. The only reason I might still try for dual citizenship is because I was thinking of travelling in the Middle East after I leave Germany and had been told that if you re passport shows entry stamps into Israel they wont let you in Syria or Iran (and vice versa) - having two passports seemed a neat way of circumventing this.

 

Anyway thats going to go on the back burner for the time being, am moving to Berlin on Monday think Ill have enough on my plate getting settled in.

 

Cheers again

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now