Washing newborns or lack of

43 posts in this topic

Gosh, gail123 - how awful for a child to have to deal with, not to mention a challenge for the parent to treat it in a timely way and to be ever vigilant in an effort toward outbreak prevention. A couple of years ago there were lots of reports on TV about it, and its increasing prevalence among kids and adults. It sounds like you help your child cope well with it - hats off. Did your doc mention what the cause(s) of neurodermitis might be? Just curious, from this discussion.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

In France babies are being bathed every day too.

Presumably with all that early washing they figure it's not so necessary in later life.

5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Gosh, gail123 - how awful for a child to have to deal with, not to mention a challenge for the parent to treat it in a timely way and to be ever vigilant in an effort toward outbreak prevention. A couple of years ago there were lots of reports on TV about it, and its increasing prevalence among kids and adults. It sounds like you help your child cope well with it - hats off. Did your doc mention what the cause(s) of neurodermitis might be? Just curious, from this discussion.

 

Thanks, liebling. From our reading we believe that there is a genetic component (my mom has psoriasis, though I don't). Daughter1 clearly has a high sensitivity to environmental elements :skin allergies to clay (some kinds) at ceramic class, allergy to a babysitter's skin lotion... and so on. Here are the risk factors

 

  • Asthma and allergies
  • Hay fever or allergic reaction from animal dander, dust, cosmetics, or pollen
  • Eczema (scaly, itchy rash)
  • Psoriasis (chronic disorder resulting in red, scaly skin)

There are some who put these in auto-immune disorders ( and others not) and some who connect it to arthritis (which is also in our family). For us, once we learned to break the itching/scratching cycle quickly, it became an easy thing to handle. The Germans who find it difficult either have a terribly bad case or they simply don't treat it quickly (when the itching starts, before the skin changes in response to the constant scratching). Cradle cap is not itchy, though and neurodermatitis was diagnosed in my daughter before any of the above (which do run in the family).

Some Germans believe in benign neglect, as I generally do: this is something that doesn't react well to it. And when one thinks that this is more diagnosed know: think back to the Bible, when people had running sores (or even back to 100 years ago) and realize that now we can care about something that minor (in the West) and live to be bothered by something that worsens (usually) in the 20-50 age group.

2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Generally speaking, "cradle cap" can be removed through gentle application of any oil, from Johnson & Johnson Baby oil to butter or margarine. Gradually the scale will loosen and can be lifted or wiped off.

2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

micro-grampus has cradle face. Oh, it's cheese spread. My mistake...

3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Second Katheliz' input. And use a brush to loosen and lift off cradle cap as suggested above. Problem solved rapidly. No big deal.

 

Not many midwives made it to university level education although I bow to their experience - if they are experienced.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One of the hardest parts about bringing up kids is the fear of "am I doing it right?".

 

We are trained for years to follow a particular career, but bringing up kids, probably the most importent and difficult job there is -> nothing - just ring us if you have a problem!!! and half the time you are not sure even if you have a problem!

 

Then add to that confusion all contradictory research just to make it a bit more difficult.

 

If you have turned out OK - and it's possible -> ask your parents - ask your partners parents - they must have done something right!!

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

um, what is cradle crap/cap (as in post title)? what is the German equivalent?

 

I don't have a baby (yet), but I know I won't bathe mine everyday. First, it's too much work, and second, I would fear it would dry out the skin. I like the idea of a baby massage though. Those courses look nice. I think a good wipe-off or cat-wash would be sufficient. I mean, I only wash my hair once a week and when I am on vacation, like when I went sailing, I only showered twice in that week. But I did clean the girly bits regularly since we are a bit susceptible to stuff.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cradle cap, called Milchshorf in German. I can't even remember how bad my kids had it, maybe a little bit. I do seem to remember rubbing oil on their heads and gently scraping the stuff off.

 

I have allergies and both eczema and psoriasis, but only in very small outbreaks and always in the same areas and I agree that it's better to nip it on the bud rather than letting it get into "full bloom". Not fun at all. Luckily neither of our kids had or have any skin problems. I was worried that something might show up since my mother also has psoriasis.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Both of my babies had (or rather, in the case of the 8 month old, have) cradle cap. Perfectly normal, perfectly harmless. Not even really any need to remove it unless it really bothers you aesthetically.

 

Cradle cap

 

Not to be confused with excema or neurodermitis or anything of the like - they are often allergic reactions and itch the baby, may ooze, and most likely look red and infected. Those need to be seen by a doctor, obviously. Normal cradle cap - meh. Toby's went away by itself within a year, Liv's is falling off of its own accord at the moment.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the explanation, gail123! I appreciate it and I think you may be helping loads of people by posting that here - esp. your advice about the importance of nipping the itch/scratch cycle in the bud each time.

Good to know!

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Our daughter is now 2 years old and we still bath her 2 or 3 times a week, sometimes more often because she loves it. I never got the hang of making it a bedtime routine because she just gets too excited in the bath. When she was a newborn I personally found it quite stressful to do so every night so I just took the midwives advise and left ut at twice a week. Also I never added soap to the water for the first couple of months because she wasn't even dirty or sweaty and I didn't want her skin to become dry and used to soap so early. However I used baby oil after the bath, one without perfume and all the other "bad" stuff (the brand of dm - babylovbe and rossmann- babydream) tested very good at ökotest).

 

A friend of mine however bathes both her kids (3 months and 2 years) every night before bed and it works for her. We are both German by the way, that is why I don't think it's a question of "german way" or "other country way". So I think it is totally up to you and what you feel is right for your baby.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I bathe my 12 week old every night as part of a routine. I wash his hair (he has tonnes!) once a week with top and tail wash from Penaten and just use the bed-time bath from Penaten in the water. I don't scrub him down, I just let him relax and play in the water for a bit. He loves it, and his skin is lovely and soft.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had two and bathed both every day from bringing them home from hospital. That was expected back in those "dark days" of the 1970s. One got cradle cap, the other didn't and neither ended up with dry skin. Oh, and both love water and were early swimmers. I'd say do whatever you are comfortable with. For me, bath time was fun as both children loved the water.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

oh-oh, this is just another one of those topic traps to get poeple to give an opinion and then attack, attack - kill the opinion that is different from mine...

 

Always a danger with baby topics. My gf has washed our daughter pretty much every evening since she was born and puts some oi in the water.

 

Daughter's skin is ok and we had few problems.

 

As I always say, it's your kid, you do it your way. However part of being a parent is to make sure that your way is not bad for the kid.

 

Then again, the internet is great for that, no matter how stupid your idea is, there will be other poeple also doing it...

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

a new way to deal with poopies would

be a huge help to parents. as a kid,

i would see japanese moms use cloth

diapers. and the moment the kid

pooped, wash the bottoms in the sink

with soap and water. kid never got

a diaper rash but very labor intensive

for the mom. and no, dads never had

diaper duty.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ask your baby!

 

Our little one positively loves the water and has ever since day one. We've given him a daily bath ever since he was a few weeks old (Olive oil, as suggested above). Very relaxing for them. Makes them nice and sleepy. Sloshing around. Laughs! Lots of fun! Never had any issues with dry skin or anything else. Very good to get through teething and other stressful times.

 

My mother is a midwife. She was there at the birth and the first thing she said to me and my wife when little man appeared was:

 

"Now, forget everything you've read, take everything anyone says with a grain of salt... even me! We've been doing this for 200,000 years. Relax and enjoy it! Trust yourself!" :)

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wise words from your midwife Mum, Masala. We have a young friend who is newly pregnant. She is anxious that she won't know what to do with her baby. I told her that she will know and told her up front that she should ignore any advice I might give her, as long as the baby is thriving and happy. It is such an individual thing, with very few right or wrong ways. I've lived long enough to know that these "rules" are just fads, that some new book is just waiting to be written to confuse young mothers further.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wish my daughter would get calm and sleepy after a bath. But she usually has so much fun that sleep is but a distant thought for a couple of hours after. So we do a couple of baths a week during the day. Other than that she gets wiped down pretty extensively.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now