Registering birth of baby born to Canadian citizens in Germany

42 posts in this topic

According to this site only one of the IDs needs to have a photo (although I realize this still doesn't help you very much): http://www.canadainternational.gc.ca/germany-allemagne/consular_services_consulaires/citizenship_guidelines-citoyennete_instructions.aspx?lang=eng&view=d

 

I recommend contacting the Embassy in Berlin. I had to contact them recently and they got back to me within 24 hours. I am sure they have exceptions / special rules for newborns.

 

Also, you can only apply for the citizenship certificate and passport at the same time if the child is not eligible for another countries passport. For the OP, if neither you or your partner hold dual citizenship and neither have lived in Germany for more than 8 years then you should be able to apply for both at the same time. We just found out that we have to get a citizenship document before we can apply for my sons passport because he is eligible for a German passport... even though we originally had no intention of getting him one.

 

Good luck!

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I cannot remember what pieces of ID we used to get my son's German Passport. I just brought everything that had his name on it.

 

I do remember the lady at the Canadian Embassy saying that if your baby does not "qualify" for passport in the country in which it was born that they will/can fast track a temporary passport. Call the embassy.

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OK...I just got confirmation from Canadian embassy. This is what is needed:

 

 



  • form pptc042, (passport application for my newborn son)
  • form pptc132_e, (notarized by lawyer)
  • form pptc116, (limited validity passport form)
  • German international birth certificate of newborn,
  • my own Canadian birth certificate,
  • the appropriate photos, for both the passport AND the certification of citizenship.

 

 

The section on the passport application which asks for proof of Canadian citizenship CAN be ignored (for a newborn).

 

thanks to everyone for their input!

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Excellent. Other than a birth certificate I didn't think they could demand ID from a newborn, especially photo ID. You'd think they'd tell you that on the form though rather than getting people all confused.

 

Hope they can fast track you!

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On 9/17/2011, 10:07:16, westvan said:

You don't need to have the German birth certificate translated and you can't get a Canadian birth certificate because the child was not born in Canada. The Certificate of Canadian Citizenship takes its place for Canadian citizens born abroad.

 

Replying rather late, but hopefully this information will be useful for someone.

Having gone through this recently, I offer some facts from my experience:

  1. Citizenship: Children born to Canadians resident in Germany for fewer than 8 years are not entitled to German citizenship.
  2. Birth certificates: You can (and should) get an international birth certificate, Mine was issued by the city Standesamt. The international version was the same price as the purely German version, you just have to ask for it. It is written in German, French, and English. My wife and I had to show up at the Standesamt and attest to our residency intentions (did or did we not intend to Germany permanently), apparently this determines which country's laws govern how the child can be named.
  3. Certificate of Canadian Citizenship: Children born outside Canada are not entitled to a Canadian birth certificate; instead the person's proof of Canadian nationality will be a Certificate of Canadian Citizenship. Currently there is a serious wait time (>1 year) for these certificates. In theory the Certificate is a prerequisite for getting a Canadian passport which would mean we couldn't travel with our child for over a year, but the Canadian embassy in Berlin advised us to complete applications for a temporary passport and a Certificate of Canadian Citizenship and issued us a temporary passport valid for 2 years, at which time we should have our child's certificate.
  4. Civil registration in Germany: Our child's passport was required for civil registration by the Ausländerbehörde.
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Add to that, if you wait too long with this, they do not issue a temporary passport if the child is older than 2.  In that case, if the child has dual citizenship and has another passport, you can request a facilitation visa if you need to travel to Canada with the child, that is unless the child's other passport is visa exempt in case it would not be a problem

 

You can also ask for urgent processing when you apply for a citizenship certificate.  Some people have reported having gotten them in a couple of months.

 

The normal processing time is listed right now as 8-9 months if you apply through an embassy.

 

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I'm a Canadian who just had a child born in Germany.  To get a citizenship certificate they are asking for two pieces of ID including one photo ID.  The problem is that my daughter has absolutely no photo ID, neither her health ID nor anything like that.  I've asked the embassy in Berlin and they just told me to "follow the instructions" on the website.  My question is:  what photo ID do people use for newborns in Germany?

 

http://www.canadainternational.gc.ca/germany-allemagne/consular_services_consulaires/citizenship_guidelines-citoyennete_instructions.aspx?lang=eng

 

Also is there a link that instruct me on the applying both for the citizenship certificate and passport in parallel?  I can't find the link and my daughter is not eligible for German citizenship since neither me nor my wife have been here for more than 8 years.

 

Edit:  Is there a link regarding on how to apply for this temporary passport while the citizenship certificate is being processed?

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1 hour ago, J0ker said:

I'm a Canadian who just had a child born in Germany.  To get a citizenship certificate they are asking for two pieces of ID including one photo ID.  The problem is that my daughter has absolutely no photo ID, neither her health ID nor anything like that.  I've asked the embassy in Berlin and they just told me to "follow the instructions" on the website.  My question is:  what photo ID do people use for newborns in Germany?

 

http://www.canadainternational.gc.ca/germany-allemagne/consular_services_consulaires/citizenship_guidelines-citoyennete_instructions.aspx?lang=eng

 

Also is there a link that instruct me on the applying both for the citizenship certificate and passport in parallel?  I can't find the link and my daughter is not eligible for German citizenship since neither me nor my wife have been here for more than 8 years.

 

Edit:  Is there a link regarding on how to apply for this temporary passport while the citizenship certificate is being processed?

 

I think it's normal for babies not to have two pieces of photo ID.  Send her birth certificate and send your photo ID.

 

As far as I know, the temporary passport is meant for if you need to travel urgently before you get the citizenship certificate.  You have to provide proof of travel too as far as I know.  So if you do need to travel, you can apply for the temporary passport at the same time.  If you don't, you can wait until you get the certificate and then apply for a normal passport for your child.

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4 hours ago, LeonG said:

 

I think it's normal for babies not to have two pieces of photo ID.  Send her birth certificate and send your photo ID.

 

As far as I know, the temporary passport is meant for if you need to travel urgently before you get the citizenship certificate.  You have to provide proof of travel too as far as I know.  So if you do need to travel, you can apply for the temporary passport at the same time.  If you don't, you can wait until you get the certificate and then apply for a normal passport for your child.

 

I think the baby will still need a certified photo though.  This seems daunting and hard to get, but we just went to the consulate with the photos we had done, and they certified them.  it worked out well and wasn't too bad. 

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Thanks for the responses.  Just another question, does anybody know if I need to submit a Use of a Representative Form if I'm applying for my infant daughter?  Or since I'm the parent it suffices just to sign the main application form for her?

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On 07/01/2016, 17.24.04, dundas said:

 

Replying rather late, but hopefully this information will be useful for someone.

Having gone through this recently, I offer some facts from my experience:

  1. Citizenship: Children born to Canadians resident in Germany for fewer than 8 years are not entitled to German citizenship.

 

Is any combination of eight years OK, or must the parent have resided continuously for the eight years preceding the birth?

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11 minutes ago, psychonaut said:

 

Is any combination of eight years OK, or must the parent have resided continuously for the eight years preceding the birth?

 

The latter.

 

"Aus der Formulierung "seit acht Jahren" ergibt sich, dass der rechtmäßige gewöhnliche Aufenthalt während des gesamten, vorangegangenen Zeitraums von acht Jahren vorgelegen haben muss."

 

BVerwG, U. v. 23.02.1993 – 1 C 45.90 – BVerwGE 92, 116 <129>

 

Source (in German)

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I'm a Canadian, and my wife is Colombian.  We're going to have a baby born in Berlin in July 2021.  I'm looking through this thread and I'm still missing some information.

  1. It seems that the goal of getting a Certificate of Canadian Citizenship (and Canadian Passport) requires first the German Birth Certificate,
  2. The German Birth Certificate requires the parent's passports, birth certificates and marriage certificate (plus Meldebescheinigung).

The parent's birth certificates and marriage certificate is where I'm getting caught up right now, as these documents need to be ordered from the Province where the birth and marriage happened, then authenticated, then legalized by the German Embassy in either Vancouver or Toronto.  

 

Has anyone here gone through this process of legalizing their civil status documents: Birth Certificate and Marriage Certificate?

My question is: do the documents need to be translated to German for the Bezirksamt to accept them? and if so, do they need to be translated in before authentication or before legalization? or can they be translated after?

 

My next question is: If we're applying for the baby's Certificate of Canadian Citizenship and Passport (applied for together) they request another original birth certificate, but do they ask for another marriage certificate as well?  And again, do these documents need to be translated, authenticated and legalized? I'm assuming not, because now we're dealing with the Canadian embassy, but who knows?

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Warning: this is not the answer.  My first thought was "he doesn't need to deal with legalization", and then I checked and I see Canada is not a member of the Hague Convention.  What?  That's nuts.  Too bad Cannucks.  You do gotta do a legalization.  (Apostille process is usually easier, but that's not an option for Canadian documents).   An Apostille will work for Colombian documents though.

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An answer about the Translation question. 

My experience using American documents was first to get the Apostille, then get everything translated.  And that worked.  So I would imagine you should get them legalized, and then get that bundle of documents translated.  (Also, that is how I have usually done things for business that had nothing to do with citizenship/passports.  First the foreign documents got legalized or Apostille, and then the translation was added.)

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On 8.3.2021, 20:27:01, Rummy said:

I'm a Canadian, and my wife is Colombian.  We're going to have a baby born in Berlin in July 2021.  I'm looking through this thread and I'm still missing some information.

  1. It seems that the goal of getting a Certificate of Canadian Citizenship (and Canadian Passport) requires first the German Birth Certificate,
  2. The German Birth Certificate requires the parent's passports, birth certificates and marriage certificate (plus Meldebescheinigung).

The parent's birth certificates and marriage certificate is where I'm getting caught up right now, as these documents need to be ordered from the Province where the birth and marriage happened, then authenticated, then legalized by the German Embassy in either Vancouver or Toronto.  

 

Has anyone here gone through this process of legalizing their civil status documents: Birth Certificate and Marriage Certificate?

My question is: do the documents need to be translated to German for the Bezirksamt to accept them? and if so, do they need to be translated in before authentication or before legalization? or can they be translated after?

 

My next question is: If we're applying for the baby's Certificate of Canadian Citizenship and Passport (applied for together) they request another original birth certificate, but do they ask for another marriage certificate as well?  And again, do these documents need to be translated, authenticated and legalized? I'm assuming not, because now we're dealing with the Canadian embassy, but who knows?

When our daughter was born, I emailed the US embassy, and they were very prompt in replying, despite COVID. Perhaps try sending them an email with your questions. 

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On 08/03/2021, 20:27:01, Rummy said:

The parent's birth certificates and marriage certificate is where I'm getting caught up right now, as these documents need to be ordered from the Province where the birth and marriage happened, then authenticated, then legalized by the German Embassy in either Vancouver or Toronto.  

 

Has anyone here gone through this process of legalizing their civil status documents: Birth Certificate and Marriage Certificate?

 

You have to order a long-form birth certificate from the service portal of your birth province. Germans want your birth cert to show your parent's names, as the German style do that too. It's not hard, just order it online, and get a family member to receive it at their address if possible, then mail it to you. You can ask for it to be legalized in Canada. I did it years ago (for my marriage here), so memories are a bit fuzzy, but it wasn't hard. I think I paid around or less than $100 all-in. 

 

On 08/03/2021, 20:27:01, Rummy said:

My question is: do the documents need to be translated to German for the Bezirksamt to accept them? and if so, do they need to be translated in before authentication or before legalization? or can they be translated after?

 

Ask your local friendly neighbourhood Standesamt. Mine personally did not request a translation, but they are well within their rights to do so. As they are fond of saying: Wir sind in Deutschland, wir sprechen hier Deutsch. If they need to be translated, this can (should be) done after, of course. If necessary, legalization can also be done at the Canadian embassy, but they charge more for the magic stamp than it would cost back in Canada.

 

On 08/03/2021, 20:27:01, Rummy said:

My next question is: If we're applying for the baby's Certificate of Canadian Citizenship and Passport (applied for together) they request another original birth certificate, but do they ask for another marriage certificate as well?

 

If you're married, then they (in Canada) will, yes. From the sounds of it, you also got married in Canada?

 

Note that you cannot get the passport unless you have an 'urgent need'. Due to corona and general bureaucracy logjams, you can expect a very long wait for the actual citizenship certificate. A year? Who knows, but right now that is quite likely. I applied over a year ago and haven't heard a single word, and still no document for my child. If your child qualifies for a (temporary) passport, they will probably send you that alone. How long have you been in Germany? Since you are both foreigners it's a bit different. My wife is German so our child was also able to immediately access local IDs. 

 

On 08/03/2021, 20:27:01, Rummy said:

 And again, do these documents need to be translated, authenticated and legalized? I'm assuming not, because now we're dealing with the Canadian embassy, but who knows?

 

The Canadian embassy will simply forward your stuff to the IRCC office in Canada (for citizenship, it's in Nova Scotia). If you got married in Germany, hopefully you just got the 'international' marriage cert that already has English (among others) on it. Otherwise, yes, you will need to get translations. If you got married in Canada, it's a moot point. This is all on the info website for the application package, and they do say anything not in English or French needs to be translated. 

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7 hours ago, alderhill said:

Note that you cannot get the passport unless you have an 'urgent need'. Due to corona and general bureaucracy logjams, you can expect a very long wait for the actual citizenship certificate. A year? Who knows, but right now that is quite likely. I applied over a year ago and haven't heard a single word, and still no document for my child. If your child qualifies for a (temporary) passport, they will probably send you that alone. How long have you been in Germany? Since you are both foreigners it's a bit different. My wife is German so our child was also able to immediately access local IDs. 

Wow, incredible! That’s how long I thought it would take with the US embassy, but we got an appointment to come in within a few weeks and got her passport and certificate of citizenship a few weeks later (this was in January 2021). I would’ve expected Canada to be even faster 🤨

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