What are you currently reading?

698 posts in this topic

I finally read the Godfather by Mario Puzo. Wow, it was good, seriously wow. I heard for years about it but thought it was hype but I was hooked on it.

 

Now reading about the history of the spanish civil war and history of germany. I flick between two depending on my mood.

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I hope either Thomas' or Bevor's books on the Civil War. Both are imformative with minimum bias. A rarity when discussing history.

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Demian - Hermann Hesse.

 

Right now, I'm not sure what's denser, the book or me for taking ages to figure

most of it out.

 

I have read "Siddhartha" and "Narcissus and Goldmund" but this one is by far much..

much kookier.

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Really? I liked it better than Narcissus and Goldmund and Steppenwolf. In fact the argument you gave for Demian is what the one I gave for N&G. Go figure. Siddhartha was just outright nice though.

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Capitalism 4.0 by Anatole Kaletsky

****- Puts the global economic crisis in historical and technical perspective, at times a challenging read, as it should be.

 

The Filter Bubble by Eli Pariser

**--- Meh. Hasn't commanded my interest, nor has it made me any more paranoid than I already am. Yet.

 

What shall I read next? I'm stalled at about 800 pages into Proust. Will wait until I am elderly and/or sick, though looking forward to reading the rest of it.

 

What's a good TC Boyle book if I've already read and enjoyed Drop City and Tortilla Curtain?

 

Along with that, I would like to read a detailed biography of Abraham Lincoln, any recommendations?

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I'm reading "Getting Things Done: The Art of Stress-Free Productivity" by David Allen. It's about learning to collect, organize and plan what you have to do into a system you trust, outside of your head so that you don't leave things until the last minute.

 

As I read it, I'm all excited at the idea of how this can change my daily routine into one of relaxed control. But in reality I'll probably put off implementing any of the changes and feel guilty about it later

 

Edit: I didn't even get the title right at first.

 

Oh, I read that book about two weeks ago. I just checked to see you weren't in D'dorf and had picked the book up in the English library like I did. Interesting book.

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You've got yourself a long painfull road ahead of you.. Do yourself a favor and, if you make it that far, just skip books 8-11 and read the cliffs notes..

 

Thanks for the tip. It took me quite a while to get into it (most of part 1), now kinda enjoying it again, but still a bit worried it will fade (at point of author's death).

 

Oh well, I can always fall back to Atlas Shrugged.

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The quest for consciousness : A neurobiological approach. By Christof Koch.

 

Koch is currently the Lois and Troendle Professor of Biology at Caltech (if I've gotten that right, haven't bothered checking). He worked extensively with Crick at the Salk Institute to unravel the neural correlates of consciousness. I got hooked to his writing after reading a few essays on his website. Although the book can get a bit technical, it isn't a problem if you're versed in some sort of biology and physics. It is brilliantly written, even though some of us may not agree with a lot of his conclusions.

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Hello Lilylou - I downloaded the book from amazon.co.uk - The Kindle is great. It even comes with a built-in dictionary and a reading lamp that pops up from the top. Kindle books are also much cheaper so eventually, the machine will pay off.

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Snow Flower and the Secret Fan by Lisa See. I'm about 75% way through and I really like it. The movie came out last month in the States but after watching the preview I don't think I'll watch it.

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You've got yourself a long painfull road ahead of you.. Do yourself a favor and, if you make it that far, just skip books 8-11 and read the cliffs notes..

 

Same could be said of Plato's Republic. Skip the first 200 pages and read the last 50 and you got it.

 

Anyway reading currently The Book Thief.

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The Rover - Joseph Conrad

Game of Thrones - George R R Martin *

Magician's Nephew - C S Lewis (with my son)

 

* I am so wanting to see the TV series - looks amazing

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Officially I'm reading Herta Müller's Atemschaukel.A good book, linguistically too, she deserves her <nobel prize, but a bit of a downer. I'm actually reading Hilary Mantell's Wolf Hall for the second time. Such a good read. I'd recommend it to anypone.

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Just finished Alone in Berlin, by Hans Fallada. Fantastic book written in or around 1949.

 

Reading at the moment the Barbarian West (History 400 - 1000 AD). Another good one.

Will start reading another Lee Child novel tonight.

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Just finished reading The Killer of Little Shepherds, about the birth of forensic science and France's worst serial killer (at the time). Great read!

 

Also just finished Nothing to Envy about Nth Korea, and Unbroken about a WWII survivor - both highly recommended (by me :D ).

 

Anyone got any good non-fiction recommendations? I'm reading Game of Thrones at the moment and need something for when it's done.

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I'm currently reading "The Gods Themselves" by Isaac Asimov. I read my way through almost 1/3rd of the book till now and it is very interesting (especially if you're from a physics background!).

 

PS: It has nothing to do with God

 

"Against stupidity, the Gods themselves contend in vain" - A quote from the book :)

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I am currently reading 21 Aldgate It is written by Patricia Friedberg. It is set in the UK and Germany during WW2. I actually know the author (she lives in my mother's condo development), and my mother and stepfather are mentioned in the acknowledgments for helping with the German interspersed through the book.

 

It's a novel but based on the author's mom's experiences.

 

Kris

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