How to deal with Nazi jokes

105 posts in this topic

 

A guy i consider a friend now made a funny statement. It's the brother of an indian girl in Düsseldorf, who never lived outside india. Being the first time in Germany he asked me why Hitler isn't respected anymore. Or IF he's respected at all and he only misses it. 'don't you like Hitler???' It was puzzling to him

 

And that he thinks many Indians admire him and want a strong leader like him.

You'd never have caught Adolf walking about in a sheet like Mahatma, toko ;)

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You'd never have caught Adolf walking about in a sheet like Mahatma, toko

 

AH loved animals, practicing vegetarian, anti alcoholic etc. The Third Reich was leading in animal protection. Animal cruelty was punished hard. There was something strangely peaceful in certain areas. :-)

 

Still, i didn't want to push my indian friend down the emotional cliff. 'Take a look at the mirror' Do you think the Nazis would have shared the love?

 

I refrained myself.

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English speakers love to make Nazi jokes - they do it often and they do it without sensitivity.As a German, have you ever encountered such a situation? How did you handle it? What advice would you give to other Germans who find this topic distressing?

 

Would this not be better if you ask this on a German forum for Germans?

 

And how dare you blanket all English speakers and say we love to make Nazi jokes. I for one don't even know any Nazi jokes, let alone want to make them.

 

How many English speaking people do you surround yourself with that you know they often make nazi jokes.

 

Do you make fat jokes? Blond Jokes? race jokes? gender related jokes? Do you also use sensitivity when making those jokes? or is it ok because it's you making the jokes about some other group.

 

My advice to you is that unless you have a time machine where you can go back and stop this whole Nazi era from ever happening, then learn to deal with the jokes that might come with it, unless you are a neo nazi or your family were nazi, I see no reason why you should even be getting so upset about this that you need to make a thread about it. I certainly will not go make a thread asking how I should deal with a group of people who make jokes about Germans, when I am not even German, the joke has no impact on me and they are clearly not talking about me because I am not German. If I found the jokes to be distasteful, I would just let them know that their jokes aren't appreciated, if it does not stop, I would consider getting new friends.

 

I certainly would not make a blanket statement about a group of people. You said English speaking people,you do realize you are including a lot of English speaking countries, and also every person who basically speaks English.

 

Sarabyrd, I agree with your statement all the way.

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I'm not German either, but I've married a German, have German children and live in Germany, so I often have to cope with jokes about Germans, and don't feel unaffected. It is something that can be difficult to deal with, as many people honestly don't realise they are being potentially offensive - and I don't always want to react harshly. Seems an interesting topic for discussion on a forum where plenty of other people must find themselves in the same situation.

 

Anyone missed this one?

 

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Times have changed to the better. And i'm talking about the 80's/90's, not 30', 40's.

Early teen. Summer camp in Limmen/Castricum (north of Amsterdam). Some dutch local youth didn't like

'Duitsers' and left us feeling it. We had to share some things with them. Football fields etc. A local park etc.

 

I remember that it really got out of hand at one point. Some kids rolled down with their bikes, someone was spit at and then a dutch kid

suddenly 'fell' of his bike. With a bloody nose and crying. And some German kid (in a vicious symbolic act) jumped on the lying bike in hateful retaliation for the spitting and jeering. Ok our supervisors were left out there and we felt 'awesome' for fighting off some slightly elder kids. But the reality behind it was quite sad if you look back.

 

I think back then you could still feel that some parents raised their kids with really deep dislike for the neighbours. And i have to say it wasn't the German kids acting nuts first.

I have heard vicious stories from England exchanges. Hardly ever though from the French.

 

I think the better communication nowadays, the internet etc. helped quite a bit to get 'real'.

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My son is German but lives in England with his mum and he went through a fair amount of shit in junior school from other children.

 

Taught him how to deliver a sharp put down to an ignoramus at an early age.

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Then again, Prince Harry's not a comedian. He's something else.

 

Yes, at least some part German - you would think if anyone could wear that uniform, it would be someone who is part of a very old institution and also who is party German. Then again...

 

 

Ginger, with one 'O' Level, and he thinks he's the Master Race???

 

M7ust have been the only time someone noticed what the ginger* person was wearing

 

"Harry wears Nazi uniform" instead of "Ginger* seen at party"

 

*I am in no way gingerphobic - at least up to Strawberry blonde :ph34r:

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"I think back then you could still feel that some parents raised their kids with really deep dislike for the neighbours."

 

Actually, I don't think my reply was off-topic since I did think you were discussing a general sense of antipathy, towards anyone regarded as different regardless of who it was directed at and why. I have no idea if the attack was provoked by my race (although their statements did seem to suggest it) - it could also have been because I'm a woman, or pregnant, or because I am slow at getting on the train sometimes when thinking deep thoughts. Also, since the original post was about Nazi jokes discussions of current xenophobia also seem relevant.

 

Sin - thanks for fighting back. I would have, but there are times when one can't. They had a third friend and from Chicago or not, the odds seemed a bit bad for a pregnant woman.

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... the sort of "at least it's not me" attitude that may have been present when they started marching people to the ovens. I doubt anyone would have so much as said "hey, isn't that too much?" if they had kicked me to the tram floor and watched my baby bleed out.

 

I realise you must have felt very scared and upset, and probably still feel really mixed up by this awful event. But this reference and extreme statement are also upsetting. I hope you won't let a few idiots drag you down to their level.

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I'm not against the jokes, but I rarely find them funny. I know that my German boyfriend does not find them funny at all, and it's not because he lacks a sense of humor.

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English speakers love to make Nazi jokes - they do it often and they do it without sensitivity.

Harry's the proof:

post-94745-13104012472965_thumb.jpg

post-94745-13104042936082.jpg

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Well, difficult area. I will say my German girlfriend´s son visited family of mine in England and one of my young nieces ribbed him with a Nazi comment. He answered " stop ridiculing my hero! ". That got a laugh and he was totally accepted. Personally, I think it´s ridiculous and insensitive as hell to make Nazi comments to young ( or even old ) Germans and I would never do it. Don´t believe in collective guilt as a concept anyway.

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I think the problem is that, unlike other nations who have massacred whole races, the Germans did it organized, methodically. They had freshly-pressed uniforms and shined boots and newly-erected gas chambers; there were no machetes in the jungle, no brutal screaming and bleeding, just this finicky, ritualized sort of killing.

 

I would venture to say that this sort of cleanliness is more horrifying than anything that has happened in Liberia or Cambodia or Sudan. The Holocaust was murder devoid of passion, and don't serial killers, the premeditatey types, fascinate us more than the people who kill their lovers in jealous rages do?

 

And while we look, horrified, at this vicious history, we cannot look away. Instead of looking at the victims and weeping unequivocally, as we would for women raped and scythed to death, we are looking at the perpetrators, trying to figure out how their robot brains functioned. At the same time - as observers, not perpetrators - we are laughing, because look at these silly men in their brown uniforms, trying to prove manliness while coming off as ridiculous. (Before taking women to bed, Hitler would show them how long he could hold his arm erect. In no way can I not find that hilarious.)

 

We marvel at that deranged logic, but we laugh at their silly Nazi art of blond peasant girls and cows. We scoff at their ugly buildings, imitate their huffy anger. We try to find traces of that methodical murder in the faces and actions of our neighbors. This is what, as observers, we must do.

 

History is never one thing or the other - it's just that the funny parts of Liberia and Cambodia are not as obvious, nor as far past.

 

(Well gee, my post was just going to be "But Nazis r funny!" and this. Now what?)

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Will you be traveling to the USA? Do you enjoy making 'jokes' about Amis? My German husband does. So my advice is, if you dish it out, be prepared to take it.

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There's a difference between a silly Nazi joke and calling someone a Nazi simply because (s)he was born in Germany.

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Will you be traveling to the USA? Do you enjoy making 'jokes' about Amis?

 

After a day in wonderful Boston, having walked the Freedom Trail and thoroughly enjoying myself, I wandered into a bookshop and presented a couple of local history books at the checkout.

 

"I dunno", I said, "Worst thing we ever did, giving up the colonies."

 

It got a laugh :)

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Yes, and the OP in no way stated anything about being called a Nazi, rather, that he doesn't like jokes about Nazis.

 

So here's an example. Why just yesterday, I bemoaned the [medically] shit genes I got from my Scandinavian heritage. I never mentioned the word Nazi, but said something to the effect of "yeah, 'master race' -- NOT!" My mother wasn't really laughing (she loves Germans), and my husband merely smirked uncomfortably.

 

Some people are just too sensitive, period. I agree with the above post that Hitler was a silly little man [ditto George Bush] -- perfect fodder for jokes! :P And hey, he wasn't even German.

 

 

"I dunno", I said, "Worst thing we ever did, giving up the colonies."

 

Truth hurts so much, it's funny! :D

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Yes, and the OP in no way stated anything about being called a Nazi, rather, that he doesn't like jokes about Nazis.

Sorry, mlovett, I wasn't referring to your post, but to the OP's.

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Depends on what's said, how it's said, in what company and in what circumstances.

 

For example - a Lebanese friend of mine thought it was hilarious that (some) Americans referred to Arabs as "sand niggers." Clearly an ignorant, nasty, racist (etc) description of a whole people - but amongst his close circle of friends he'd refer to himself as a "goddam sand-nigger". We understood the self-deprecating irony and loved him for it.

 

Similarly, my Polish g/f asked a German friend of mine for advice on some serious matters, and he said: "Look, I'm going to be very Prussian and tell you exactly what you should do..." The fact that he's gay, flamboyant, and the most un-"Prussian" stereotype imaginable made the whole interchange hilarious. He knew it and we knew it.

 

Then again, when travelling in the (fomer) DDR, someone I met and got along with very well thought it was funny that the English-speaking world called the DDR the GDR. "Know what that stands for?" he asked. Before I'd had a moment to think he said: "Grossdeutsches Reich."

 

It's also funny (for me anyway) to listen to what other people say about "white" stereotypes. Richard Pryor used to have me in stitches with some of his descriptions of "White Folks" - maybe because I never thought he was being malicious.

 

I guess there are times and places for un-politically correct things to be said - but no blanket rules.

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