Finding it incredibly difficult to get a new job

56 posts in this topic

If Google are not going to give you interview coaching, you'll have to do your own self assessment. If you have the skills someone wants and don't do or say anything stupid at an interview or on your CV, then you will eventually get something if you are prepared to persist.

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I suspect most of us here would be rejected by google! "Fitting the profile" just gets you an entry ticket to the competition. Nothing more. You can't afford to take it personally. People get rejected by the major globals all the time. So many people want to work for them.

 

Being multi-lingual is normal in the global marketplace. Most of my associates here have three (native German + 2 / native + English + German / English + German + 1). I have two languages, fluent German and "basic" in another. No big deal. Just a generic skill - like being able to use a spreadsheet or something. However, I also know IT experts with no German who pick up work easily enough, usually contract.

 

This "skills shortages" thing is often very specific it seems to me. It does not apply to whole markets (eg. IT, Finance). My city is home to Europe's second largest software firm. Its vacancy list is massive. You don't say what you skill actually is. (I'm "in Finance" but would never get an investment banking job, that's not my skill).

 

Also, contacts count for a lot now. Find out where the ops are.

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Well, if it's any consolation, it took me a year to find a permanent job in London in 1995. I could speak four languages, had a typing speed of 65 wpm, had secretarial and teaching experience and yet and yet... despite signing up with 20+ recruitment agencies, some specialising in people with language skills, it was only a Japanese company that took me on in the end.

 

I have a German friend who moved from D'dorf to Stuttgart nearly a year ago when she got married and she's terribly frustrated, too. She has great skills, has native speaker level English (she taught it and I spoke to her and she makes a lot fewer mistakes than the native speakers I know in the UK. She has HR experience, marketing experience, worked for a huge international company .. but I reckon it's her 4 or 5 years of freelance work (training teachers, teaching English, marketing, recruitment) that means that no-one wants her.

 

Of course, being 40 and having lots of experience also doesn't help. She's probably seen as too expensive.

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After having read some of your threads, I understand the recruiters. I think, it has something to do with your personality and not your qualification.

 

I don't think the recruiters do a personality search in Toytown before rejecting an applicant :)

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also, maybe your problem with google is that most of their jobs in europe are in their european HQ in Dublin NOT in Germany in the first place.

They probably receive 1000s of applications for the few posts that there are in the first place.

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Roughly speaking what areas are your skills and expertise in?

Getting hired is very much a matter of being in the right place at the right time and making sure the people who might want your skills know about you (Linkedin & Xing are helpful in that people can verify that you are 'known' in your industry).

 

Definately apply to all the big firms as demoralising as it might be filling out loads of online formulas, these firms have internal job markets and they will trawl these DBs for external candidates if no internal people can be found before going external (this is how I got my current position).

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I still have hundreds of rejection letters in my inbox. I hope everybody does.

 

Try to figure out what is missing. Show your CV/Cover letter to your friends/enemies and get a feedback. Once an 18 year old found a typo in my CV!

 

Keep trying. Good luck

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I'm not a genius,

 

You have to have that something special to work at Google (as a dev). Simply having work-exp isnt enough.

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not sure why someone is giving someone shit based on what some previous postings are...if you seriously believe what people post says it all about a person...then you need to get out and meet more people...and he did say it was just a rant...

 

...and don't worry about Google...there is an entire industry created out there that isn't in the real world...and these guys have helped sustain it...

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Check out this interviewing guide. It's biased towards the interviewer, not the interviewee, but tells you the psyche of "their" side of things. At some point in that article it talks about the CV and current skills not being the most important thing. If you're a good software engineer then you'll be able to adapt and learn whatever is current. It's mostly about whether the person is clever and gets things done. Personality plays a large part in it too. I recommend reading the whole thing.

 

btw, it feels great turning Google down :lol:

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An HR friend of mine here explained that her firm doesn't ever give feedback to applicants in the recruitment process, as it opens up the firm to potential claims.

 

Job-hunting can really take time and is certainly stressful. But I wish you lots of luck.

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Hello,

just a small rant, because, despite I keep hearing IT recruiters complaining that "we find it incredibly difficult to find skilled people, nobody wants to move from his/her current job, crap crap...", I've found in the last months incredibly difficult to be hired in companies in Germany and outside Germany. I'm not a genius, but I have some years of industry experience, I learn quickly, I lived so far in 3 different countries, I know fluently 2 languages, plus A2-B1 German, and basic Norwegian...but apparently I don't fit in any profile for which I apply.

 

And of course I've been rejected for the 3rd (and last...I don't want to waste more of my time with them) time by Google. And being the rude snob that they are, they did not give me a detailed feedback on why I've not been accepted into the cult...just the standard typical corporate answer

"Unfortunately we will not proceed further with you application.

All the best (we don't have 5 minutes of our precious time to give you hints on what went wrong, what you could improve...after all, we are Google, everyone wants to work here, so shut up loser)"

 

So much for "We are not evil", "We are different", bla bla...

 

Note: I know I'm lucky to currently have a job...

 

Alexander: how about going for self-employed status? No bosses, no interviews , no meetings on Monday morning, you choose your holiday times etc. Not for the nervous but suits me.

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I learn quickly...And of course I've been rejected for the 3rd (and last...I don't want to waste more of my time with them) time by Google. Note: I know I'm lucky to currently have a job...

 

Alex, a quick learner would NOT have applied to Google three times!

If they don´t want you once, they won´t want you a second or third time!

 

From your "appearances" on TT, I would seriously question whether you learn quickly, but maybe that's just my own personal opinion...(?)

 

I only hope that you have already learnt enough NOT to have already given notice at the job you are in?!

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I am finding it hard to even get talked to... OK, I only applied to 2 places, but for my background, there isn't a lot out there. I can accept not getting a job as I am not that arrogant to think that will happen (at least not anymore :) ) but I will say I have been pretty taken aback that they didn't even call me in even though my background fits their job descriptions perfectly.

 

I am probably going to apply to one of the companies again, but go about it a different way, contact someone via LinkedIn rather than going through the HR. Start with the technical people and try and make a personal connection. Maybe go to a technical conference where they will have people and try and meet someone that way...but that takes time!

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In the same boat here. I swear, I have applied for jobs here which had descriptions that practically duplicated what is on my CV...and nothing. I try to stay positive but I am becoming more and more convinced everyday that the only way to get a decent job in Germany is to either a)be very lucky, b)have a sufficiently 'German' sounding name, or c)have been transfered here into a decent position from another country. Other than that, thanks to German inflexibility, I honestly cannot see how one can realistically expect to find anything other than entry-level or internship types of positions regardless of how many years of experience one might have. It's beyond frustrating.

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Alexander: how about going for self-employed status? No bosses, no interviews , no meetings on Monday morning, you choose your holiday times etc. Not for the nervous but suits me.

 

john: Thanks for the tip...I've actually though about this in the last few days.

It might be a nightmare at the beginning, especially from the point of view of taxes, bureaucracy...but it might give me the freedom that I want.

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