How to avoid a serious tipping mistake

166 posts in this topic

I tip 10% in restaurants, taxis and takeaway people, give 4 euros to the Bringmeister guy if he brings a lot up 4 flights, 10 euros to someone bring me a new tv, 1 - 1.50 per night to the hotel maid and so on, 10% to the hairdresser before I started doing it myself, . My East German wife guides my tipping and she is nice.  

 

In answer to the kitchen installer question I guess I would give 30 Euros.

 

American 20% tipping really gets to me, as does the American thing where you tip the guy who takes out the bag from the car at a great hotel and the guy who takes it to the room, I only tip once for this. I hate the American bed turn down service, especially when they try to get into the room at 10.20 pm.

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On ‎2016‎-‎08‎-‎31‎ ‎5‎:‎26‎:‎49‎, Joanie said:

oh wow, wasn't expecting to come back from the bakery to so many responses. I really appreciate it.  The 8% came from a post further up thread, i saw it and did a calculation and pretty much immediately dismissed it.  didn't search back further to see where it came from.

 

This has likely been a hefty kitchen install (not sure, i have no comparison).  I think this is their 4th visit, the first was a half day, the second a full day, the third maybe an hour and today will be another full day, if not more.  It sounds like you guys agree that 20 euros each is ok, because tipping on percent of the kitchen seems nuts to me.  I mean, just the types of appliances can make the difference between a 10K kitchen and a 20K kitchen.  

 

So i got some treats from edeka, and will give them coffee too, and 20 bucks a piece.  

Hope the kitchen looks good!

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6 hours ago, fraufruit said:

 

They can be as creative as they want with their cash customers and still take plastic.

I don't know of any restaurants that don't take cards these days.

Maybe in (expensive) Munich it's like that, but on average I don't expect a restaurant/bar to accept any cards. Well, that's why it's called Bargeld: a type of money you use in a bar.

 

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I think you should always carry cash for emergencies. 

I have never had my wallet stolen but I always make sure a thief gets a maximum of 20 euro or less. Carrying cash is an invitation for pickpockets. In case of emergency like electricity blackout etc one can request a Rechnung and pay at home.

 

 

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6 hours ago, black1 said:

I tip 10% in restaurants, taxis and takeaway people, give 4 euros to the Bringmeister guy if he brings a lot up 4 flights, 10 euros to someone bring me a new tv, 1 - 1.50 per night to the hotel maid and so on, 10% to the hairdresser before I started doing it myself.

 

I hate the American bed turn down service, especially when they try to get into the room at 10.20 pm.

TV's are not so heavy anymore as they used to be :). Try a washing machine or sleeping sofa.

 

I also tip the hotel maid when I am on holiday. They earn shit. Hairdressers as well, but I wouldn't tip a medic, nurse,etc. In Holland you can send e.g. apple pie instead if you are pleased with the treatment.

 

Haha, I remember this bed turn down service with a chocolate on your pillow, but you find this in some 5- star hotels in Europe as well. Solution: put the sign "Please don't disturb." on your door knob. It also prevents maids entering your room at 8 am :).

 

My friend just returned from South-Korea and Japan, where tipping is seen as an offense, so he tipped nobody. Saved him a lot of Won and Yen :).

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Although unrelated to germany but still about tipping.

 

Just bear in mind, when visiting countries outside the EU like Turkey and you want to reward or tip for the service you've received then do so, but don't give them all your loose change and schrapnell, it's of no use and they cannot use it.

 

Just reward them with notes, pounds, dollars or eurominions but not the loose crap.

 

If you want clean towels, rose petals thrown all over the bed and your childrens pyjamas made into some kind of animal then take in addition some smaller notes like 5's and 10's with you to exchange their loose change given by the less thoughtful. You might come home with a load of schrapnell in exchange but you will have the best kept hotel room for the duration.

 

Just take that as a tip from me.

 

 

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On 8/31/2016, 11:14:48, Porky Pine said:

Believe me, I know the difference between a tip jar and a jar placed by an organization collecting money for their cause. I usually throw change in those.

Blergh, what for? So literally 95% of it can go to paying the wages of its employees, "administrative" costs etc? At least when you leave a tip (not that a jar in any way forces you to do so) you know where it's going (mostly). I wouldn't tip at the convenience store either but you'd be surprised what drunk people wind up wanting to tip for. I (sober) am always inclined to tip the guy who makes my take-away döner although I know it's neither necessary nor expected and have lived here long enough to know it just goes right back in the register anyway. Force of habit. 

 

21 hours ago, fraufruit said:

 

I don't know of any restaurants that don't take cards these days.

Difference #436852575b between Munich and Berlin

 

15 hours ago, yourkeau said:

Carrying cash is an invitation for pickpockets. 

Eh, is it though? Do you really mean "carrying cash" or do you mean "withdrawing cash from the train station ATM at 4 in the morning"? Or, " getting out your cash and fanning yourself with the bigger bills whilst attempting to pour a drunk friend into a taxi "? Around here the best way to mark oneself for robbery is playing around with an expensive gadget, cluelessly bumbling around an unfamiliar area, and being open to engaging in unsolicited chitchat with strangers.

 

Back strictly on topic: we're having a refrigerator delivered in the next couple days. Do we tip the guy who carries it up? We live on the 2nd floor in a Neubau with nice smooth stone steps (i.e. not those awful tall wooden ones found in more stylish Altbauten).

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Are you sure he's going to carry it up the stairs anyway? When we moved here, the delivery guy brought it to the (street level) front door, but no further even though there are no steps inside, either. Little bit of a surprise, especially since the washing machine delivery guy at our last house hauled the thing up a steep flight of garden steps and took it right into the laundry room.

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Well, errr yeah we had ASSumed it'd be brought up, but only going by our own relatively recent washing machine delivery, preformed upon a young man's strong back and supervised by an old guy with a clipboard. I wasn't about to tip the guy asking for the autograph so both lost out. We were thinking we'd be more proactive about tipping the guy who does the heavy lifting, this time. Of course, a fridge left on the ground floor of our building for us to carry up ourselves won't be in the running for any tip action. The question then is what to tip in the event someone or someones haul it up right to our apartment door.

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Give em a tenner. The old guy with the clipboard probably did his share of hauling back in the day.

 

All of our appliances were delivered properly. If the person won't bring it in where it belongs, I would tell them to take it back.

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17 hours ago, yourkeau said:

 Well, that's why it's called Bargeld: a type of money you use in a bar.

 

Off topic I guess, but the similariy with the word bar meaning a place to drink is purely coincidental.

 

https://de.wiktionary.org/wiki/bar

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mittelhochdeutsch und althochdeutsch bar; aus germanisch *baza-bar, bloß“, dieses aus indogermanisch *bhoso- mit der gleichen Bedeutung. Das Wort ist seit dem 10. Jahrhundert belegt. Zahlreiche verwandte Wörter in anderen indogermanischen Sprachen. Man nimmt an, dass ein indogermanisches Verb *bhes-/ *bhsā/ *psā- mit der Bedeutung „reiben, abreiben“ zugrundeliegt. Die Bedeutung entwickelt sich demnach von abgerieben zu nackt, bloß. Daraus entstehen die Bedeutungen „ohne etwas“ (wie in bar jeder Einsicht) und „offen vor Augen liegend“ (schon im Mittelhochdeutsch auf Geld bezogen).[1]

 

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15 hours ago, LukeSkywalker said:

"Please don't disturb." on your door knob. It also prevents maids entering your room at 8 am :).

 

Doesn't that depend on the "room service"

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Back on the subject of tipping in bars and restaurants, I operate on the principle that if a waiter/ess has brought it to my table, they deserve a tip if done relatively speedily. However, I never tip when I order myself at a bar, even though amazingly many Germans seem to find it quite normal. I fail to see how staff standing behind a bar are offering anything other than routine service. 

 

At the same time, I think customers being served at tables is part of the deal to encourage them to give tips. Bit of a racket really on the part of owners. Just encourages them to underpay their staff.   

 

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9 hours ago, alexunterwegs said:

Back on the subject of tipping in bars and restaurants,

I fail to see how staff standing behind a bar are offering anything other than routine service.

 

 

in NYC and Chicago, it was definitely common to tip bartenders in 1990s.  Beyond that time and geography I don't have a plethora of personal experience.

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The bartender is on her/his feet the entire shift and making all of the drinks for the whole restaurant. That is why you tip them.

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I was told, to round up to the nearest Euro, as the staff are paid enough in Germany.

 

While in the US, give them 20 %, as the staff are not paid enough, and get part of the wages from tips

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17 minutes ago, yesterday said:

I was told, to round up to the nearest Euro, as the staff are paid enough in Germany.

I round up to the nearest euro+1 for smaller amounts, e.g. €16,40 becomes €18 or €23,20 becomes €25. For bigger amounts I round up to nearest euro+2 or 3. During Corona I tip more. 

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yeah, I have been to a few restaurants in the last week or 2, seems the prices have gone up, dishes I would normally get for 12 Euro are now 15 Euro. 

 

I know the restaurants have probably lost a lot of money during the pandemic, but I cannot ever see the prices coming back down

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7 hours ago, fraufruit said:

The bartender is on her/his feet the entire shift and making all of the drinks for the whole restaurant. That is why you tip them.

So what? You can expand on that principle to tip the entire kitchen staff. There are loads of jobs where people 'behind the scenes' contribute to a business, but it comes back to the owners underpaying in the first place, and then expecting that tippers will pick up the slack. 

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