How to avoid a serious tipping mistake

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I'm glad i used the search function and now I'm bumping this thread.  Kitchen installers are here right now, and I'm frozen not knowing what to do. 

 

My MIL says she ALWAYS prepares food or something for workmen.  At the very least, coffee.  Kind of hard to do because you know, i don't have a kitchen.  My car is also blocked in, so I am thinking about biking to the Edeka to pick up at least some donuts.  

 

Then there's the tipping.  8% for a well-outfitted "forever" kitchen is a bit hefty for me.   I was thinking 20 euros per dude (there's two of them).  Too much? Too little? I am neurotic about these things. 

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Just now, Joanie said:

I'm glad i used the search function and now I'm bumping this thread.  Kitchen installers are here right now, and I'm frozen not knowing what to do. 

 

My MIL says she ALWAYS prepares food or something for workmen.  At the very least, coffee.  Kind of hard to do because you know, i don't have a kitchen.  My car is also blocked in, so I am thinking about biking to the Edeka to pick up at least some donuts.  

 

Then there's the tipping.  8% for a well-outfitted "forever" kitchen is a bit hefty for me.   I was thinking 20 euros per dude (there's two of them).  Too much? Too little? I am neurotic about these things. 


Both the donuts from Edeka and the 20 euros per dude sound good to me.  It's a very nice gesture, and I think and hope it will be appreciated. 
8% of the price of your "forever" kitchen is a bit hefty for me, too.
I know a filthy rich person who never ever tips Handwerker, even though this person can definitely afford to do so.  To each his own, but to me that is being tight-fisted.

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Donuts would be nice. How much you tip is up to you. We usually give between €5 and €15 per person depending on how long they were there and what was done. Kitchen installation people would get a decent tip if they did their job well.

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10 minutes ago, Joanie said:

I'm glad i used the search function and now I'm bumping this thread.  Kitchen installers are here right now, and I'm frozen not knowing what to do. 

 

My MIL says she ALWAYS prepares food or something for workmen.  At the very least, coffee.  Kind of hard to do because you know, i don't have a kitchen.  My car is also blocked in, so I am thinking about biking to the Edeka to pick up at least some donuts.  

 

Then there's the tipping.  8% for a well-outfitted "forever" kitchen is a bit hefty for me.   I was thinking 20 euros per dude (there's two of them).  Too much? Too little? I am neurotic about these things. 

 

 

My Mom always had something to offer, like your MIL, even if it's just coffee, or lemonade/water on hot days/afternoons. 

 

Last time I hired workmen, it was to move places in Los Angeles, and we tipped them like 20$ each for their two hours of time (we only used them at one location to carry boxes/furniture out of the first place and only had 20$s otherwise might be less).

 

Maybe decide on a tip per hour of work instead?  2 per hour or something?  I have no idea how long installing your kitchen will take though.

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Where does the 8% come from ?? There was a thread talking about tipping yesterday. It always seems to be Americans who insist on this and make up the rules. If you feel that the handwerkers have charged you a fair price maybe you could round it up a bit. The €20 a piece is a nice gesture but I hate this (usually American) idea of tipping a percentage for this and for that. If they're spending a long time working on your kitchen I'm sure they'd appreciate a donut or sandwich from Edeka. Maybe you could say that you're going to the supermarket and ask them what they'd like to eat ?

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5 minutes ago, Jonny said:

Where does the 8% come from ?? There was a thread talking about tipping yesterday. It always seems to be Americans who insist on this and make up the rules. If you feel that the handwerkers have charged you a fair price maybe you could round it up a bit. The €20 a piece is a nice gesture but I hate this (usually American) idea of tipping a percentage for this and for that. If they're spending a long time working on your kitchen I'm sure they'd appreciate a donut or sandwich from Edeka. Maybe you could say that you're going to the supermarket and ask them what they'd like to eat ?


I hate hate hate the over-the-top tipping that has been going on in the United States for a while. I'm referring to those infernal tip jars you see everywhere.
Take some clothes to the dry cleaner, and oh look, there's a tip jar. Go to a 7-Eleven for some Cheetoes or a Coke, and there's a tip jar up by the cashier.
Go to a walk-in medical clinic, and oh my God, there's another damn tip jar.  I am usually struck down by immediate blindness when I see them, unless my American friends shame me into dropping in a few coins.
But for heaven's sake...a tip jar in a walk-in medical clinic (and not one offering free services to the poor)???:wacko:

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21 minutes ago, Joanie said:

Then there's the tipping.  8% for a well-outfitted "forever" kitchen is a bit hefty for me.  

If two blokes deliver a washing machine to my flat (3rd floor) why the hell should I tip them based on the price of the washing machine? I am tiping them for hard grafting, and there is no difference if it is a golden washing machine or a sack of potatoes. I expect those men to earn less then 10€/hour, so giving them a 5€ tip per hour would increase their income by more than 50%. If your kitchen blokes take 4 hours to set up everything, 20€ will certainly do the job. If they're done in two hours, go for 10€.

 

I know a filthy rich person who never ever tips

Nobody ever got rich by spending money...

 

 

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4 minutes ago, Porky Pine said:


I hate hate hate the over-the-top tipping that has been going on in the United States for a while. I'm referring to those infernal tip jars you see everywhere.
Take some clothes to the dry cleaner, and oh look, there's a tip jar. Go to a 7-Eleven for some Cheetoes or a Coke, and there's a tip jar up by the cashier.
Go to a walk-in medical clinic, and oh my God, there's another damn tip jar.  I am usually struck down by immediate blindness when I see them, unless my American friends shame me into dropping in a few coins.
But for heaven's sake...a tip jar in a walk-in medical clinic (and not one offering free services to the poor)???:wacko:

 

In some cases, are you sure they were tip jars?  Often locals and organizations will be allowed to place them to collect money for a cause but they will look like a tip jar. 

 

I have never seen a true tip jar at a 7-11 or walk-in clinic, so I guess it's the limit of sample size.

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2 minutes ago, slycookies said:

In some cases, are you sure they were tip jars?  Often locals and organizations will be allowed to place them to collect money for a cause but they will look like a tip jar. 

 

I have never seen a true tip jar at a 7-11 or walk-in clinic, so I guess it's the limit of sample size.


Nope, they were tip jars. Believe me, I know the difference between a tip jar and a jar placed by an organization collecting money for their cause. I usually throw change in those.
 

I did a double take back in 1998 when I saw the tip jar at the dry cleaner's, and I really did a big double take at that walk-in clinic, where they gave me an enormous bill for a 5-minute visit (thank God for Auslandsreiseversicherung!).  After that, the tip jar at that 7-11 or whatever the convenience store was called didn't really faze me. The employees there probably get an absolute shit wage, but I don't recall seeing much money in the jar.
My friends back in the States say they are used to seeing tip jars anywhere and everywhere now; they're normal. :blink:

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oh wow, wasn't expecting to come back from the bakery to so many responses. I really appreciate it.  The 8% came from a post further up thread, i saw it and did a calculation and pretty much immediately dismissed it.  didn't search back further to see where it came from.

 

This has likely been a hefty kitchen install (not sure, i have no comparison).  I think this is their 4th visit, the first was a half day, the second a full day, the third maybe an hour and today will be another full day, if not more.  It sounds like you guys agree that 20 euros each is ok, because tipping on percent of the kitchen seems nuts to me.  I mean, just the types of appliances can make the difference between a 10K kitchen and a 20K kitchen.  

 

So i got some treats from edeka, and will give them coffee too, and 20 bucks a piece.  

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30 minutes ago, franklan said:

...Nobody ever got rich by spending money...

 

 

 

Tell Elon Musk that ;)

 

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didn't those 7-11 tip jars kind of originate from the "need a penny, take a penny" idea?  

 

Anyways, i see them (TrinkGeld) more in German stores than i ever did in Canada.  I think calling it "Drink Money" is genius on the part of whoever decided to label tips as such.  Who wants to deny their hairdresser a refreshing drink? Only assholes, that's who. 

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11 minutes ago, Joanie said:

 

 

Anyways, i see them (TrinkGeld) more in German stores than i ever did in Canada.  I think calling it "Drink Money" is genius on the part of whoever decided to label tips as such.  Who wants to deny their hairdresser a refreshing drink? Only assholes, that's who. 

 

In the other tip thread that I started :) I had mentioned how my husband always left a "tip" at the doctor here in Germany. But yes it was for "TrinkGeld" .

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You could have paid by card... Oh wait this is Germany and those restaurants like to be creative on their tax returns . Nur bargeld bitte. 

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23 hours ago, Adem137 said:

those restaurants like to be creative on their tax returns

 

They can be as creative as they want with their cash customers and still take plastic.

I don't know of any restaurants that don't take cards these days.

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16 minutes ago, fraufruit said:

They can be as creative as they want with their cash customers and still take plastic.

I don't know of any restaurants that don't take cards these days.

 

I do.  They briefly considered taking cards but decided against it.  It's generally not a problem.  If somebody doesn't have cash, they can come back and pay later.

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Ha, I've been to restaurants here in Munich that don't take any cards at all. One that comes to mind immediately is Cyclo (Vietnamese). Maybe they've finally changed their policy and accept EC cards at least, but the last time I was there, they didn't. Strictly cash, but I have absolutely no problem with an all-cash business, as long as I know ahead of time.

 

On my birthday earlier this year, I went to a really nice Italian place to celebrate with hubby and a friend. Ran up a big bill, then when we went to pay, they said, "Oh sorry, our card machine isn't working." We didn't have that kind of cash on us, and we all thought it would have been darn nice for them to tell customers in advance, at the latest when customers start to order. There was no sign on the door about it, either. It's not the kind of place you could eat at for less than €30 per person, not by a long shot. Hubby had to walk 4 blocks to an ATM and get cash while we cooled our heels.
Our friend went back to the restaurant several days later, and asked out of curiosity about paying with a card. 
They said, "Oh, our card machine isn't working". Gee,really? What a coincidence. Again, no note or sign on the door. They won't get our business again, because we suspect that they make a habit of their card machine being kaputt.

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There are several restaurants here that don't have card machines.  Always a shock for visiting colleagues when they try to buy our meal with their card.  We also found the same for a few smaller places in Munich two weeks ago. 

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It also happened a couple of times when my boss and I were in Solingen on business and were looking for places to eat.  He normally doesn't carry cash and I normally do so I ended up lending him money a couple of times.  If you only carry a card, you are better off asking before you order if they take cards.

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I was a bit irritated in the UK recently when I went to buy something and I was asked for my card by the cashier. She just assumed I would pay by card. But I'm old fashioned and paid by cash.

 

I think you should always carry cash for emergencies. 

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